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Business Contract Lawyer Spanish Fork

“Secure Your Business with a Professional Business Contract Lawyer in Spanish Fork!”

Introduction

Business Contract Lawyer Spanish Fork is a law firm that specializes in providing legal services to businesses in the Spanish Fork area. Our team of experienced attorneys is dedicated to helping businesses of all sizes navigate the complexities of contract law. We understand the importance of having a well-drafted contract that protects your interests and provides you with the best possible outcome. We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality legal advice and representation. Whether you are a small business or a large corporation, our team of experienced attorneys can help you with all of your contract law needs.

How to Choose the Right Business Contract Lawyer in Spanish Fork

Choosing the right business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork is an important decision that can have a significant impact on the success of your business. A good business contract lawyer can help you navigate the complexities of business law and ensure that your contracts are legally sound. Here are some tips to help you choose the right business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork:

1. Research: Before you hire a business contract lawyer, it is important to do your research. Look for lawyers who specialize in business contract law and have experience in the Spanish Fork area. Check out their websites and read reviews from past clients to get an idea of their level of expertise.

2. Experience: Make sure the lawyer you choose has experience in the specific area of business contract law that you need help with. Ask them about their experience and make sure they have a good understanding of the laws in Spanish Fork.

3. Communication: It is important to find a lawyer who is easy to communicate with and who is willing to answer your questions. Make sure you feel comfortable talking to them and that they are willing to explain the legal process in detail.

4. Fees: Ask the lawyer about their fees and make sure you understand what services they are providing and how much they will charge. Make sure you are comfortable with the fee structure before signing any contracts.

By following these tips, you can ensure that you choose the right business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork for your needs. With the right lawyer, you can rest assured that your business contracts are legally sound and that you are protected.

The Benefits of Working with a Business Contract Lawyer in Spanish Fork

Working with a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork can provide a number of benefits to businesses. A business contract lawyer can help to ensure that all contracts are legally binding and enforceable, and can provide advice on how to best protect the interests of the business. Additionally, a business contract lawyer can help to ensure that all contracts are drafted in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.

One of the primary benefits of working with a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork is that they can provide advice on how to best protect the interests of the business. A business contract lawyer can review the terms of a contract and provide advice on how to best protect the business’s interests. This can include advice on how to structure the contract, how to negotiate the terms of the contract, and how to ensure that the contract is legally binding and enforceable.

Another benefit of working with a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork is that they can help to ensure that all contracts are drafted in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. A business contract lawyer can review the terms of a contract and ensure that they are in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. This can help to protect the business from potential legal issues in the future.

Finally, a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork can provide advice on how to best negotiate the terms of a contract. A business contract lawyer can provide advice on how to best structure the contract, how to negotiate the terms of the contract, and how to ensure that the contract is legally binding and enforceable. This can help to ensure that the business is able to get the best possible deal when negotiating a contract.

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Overall, working with a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork can provide a number of benefits to businesses. A business contract lawyer can help to ensure that all contracts are legally binding and enforceable, and can provide advice on how to best protect the interests of the business. Additionally, a business contract lawyer can help to ensure that all contracts are drafted in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. By working with a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork, businesses can ensure that they are able to get the best possible deal when negotiating a contract.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Drafting a Business Contract in Spanish Fork

1. Not Including All Necessary Information: When drafting a business contract, it is important to include all necessary information. This includes the names of the parties involved, the purpose of the contract, the terms and conditions, and any other relevant information. Failing to include all necessary information can lead to confusion and disputes down the line.

2. Not Having the Contract Reviewed by a Professional: Before signing a business contract, it is important to have it reviewed by a professional. A lawyer or other legal professional can help ensure that the contract is legally binding and that all parties understand their rights and obligations.

3. Not Being Specific Enough: Business contracts should be as specific as possible. Vague language can lead to confusion and disputes. It is important to clearly define the terms and conditions of the contract and to include any relevant details.

4. Not Including a Termination Clause: A termination clause should be included in any business contract. This clause outlines the conditions under which either party can terminate the contract. Without this clause, either party may be able to terminate the contract without any legal repercussions.

5. Not Including a Dispute Resolution Clause: A dispute resolution clause should be included in any business contract. This clause outlines the process for resolving any disputes that may arise between the parties. Without this clause, either party may be able to take legal action without any prior warning.

Understanding the Different Types of Business Contracts in Spanish Fork

Business contracts are an important part of any business transaction. They provide a legal framework for the parties involved to ensure that all parties understand their rights and obligations. In Spanish Fork, Utah, there are several different types of business contracts that can be used to protect the interests of all parties involved.

The first type of business contract is a purchase agreement. This type of contract is used when one party is purchasing goods or services from another party. It outlines the terms of the sale, including the price, payment terms, delivery terms, and any warranties or guarantees. It also outlines the responsibilities of each party in the event of a dispute.

The second type of business contract is a lease agreement. This type of contract is used when one party is leasing property from another party. It outlines the terms of the lease, including the length of the lease, the amount of rent, and any other terms and conditions. It also outlines the responsibilities of each party in the event of a dispute.

The third type of business contract is a service agreement. This type of contract is used when one party is providing services to another party. It outlines the terms of the services, including the scope of the services, the payment terms, and any other terms and conditions. It also outlines the responsibilities of each party in the event of a dispute.

The fourth type of business contract is an employment agreement. This type of contract is used when one party is hiring another party to work for them. It outlines the terms of the employment, including the job description, salary, benefits, and any other terms and conditions. It also outlines the responsibilities of each party in the event of a dispute.

These are just a few of the different types of business contracts that can be used in Spanish Fork, Utah. It is important to understand the different types of contracts and how they can be used to protect the interests of all parties involved. By understanding the different types of contracts, businesses can ensure that their interests are protected and that all parties understand their rights and obligations.

What to Look for in a Business Contract Lawyer in Spanish Fork

When looking for a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork, it is important to consider a few key factors. First, it is important to find a lawyer who is experienced in business contract law. This means that the lawyer should have a thorough understanding of the laws and regulations that govern business contracts in the state of Utah. Additionally, the lawyer should have a proven track record of successfully negotiating and drafting business contracts.

Second, it is important to find a lawyer who is knowledgeable about the specific needs of your business. This means that the lawyer should be able to provide advice and guidance on the best way to structure a contract that meets the needs of your business. The lawyer should also be able to provide advice on how to protect your business interests in the contract.

Third, it is important to find a lawyer who is accessible and responsive. This means that the lawyer should be available to answer questions and provide advice in a timely manner. Additionally, the lawyer should be willing to work with you to ensure that the contract meets your needs and is in compliance with the law.

Finally, it is important to find a lawyer who is reliable and trustworthy. This means that the lawyer should be willing to provide honest and accurate advice and should be willing to stand behind their work. Additionally, the lawyer should be willing to provide references from past clients who can attest to their professionalism and expertise.

By taking the time to consider these factors, you can ensure that you find a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork who is experienced, knowledgeable, accessible, reliable, and trustworthy.

Q&A

1. What is the role of a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork?

A business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork is responsible for providing legal advice and assistance to businesses in the area. They help businesses draft, review, and negotiate contracts, as well as advise on legal issues related to business operations. They also provide guidance on compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

2. What types of contracts do business contract lawyers in Spanish Fork typically handle?

Business contract lawyers in Spanish Fork typically handle a variety of contracts, including employment contracts, vendor contracts, lease agreements, and purchase agreements. They may also provide advice on intellectual property matters, such as trademarks and copyrights.

3. What qualifications should I look for in a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork?

When selecting a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork, it is important to look for an attorney who is experienced in the area of business law and has a good understanding of the local laws and regulations. It is also important to find an attorney who is knowledgeable about the specific needs of your business.

4. How much does it cost to hire a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork?

The cost of hiring a business contract lawyer in Spanish Fork will vary depending on the complexity of the matter and the attorney’s experience. Generally, attorneys charge an hourly rate for their services.

5. What should I do if I have a dispute with a business contract in Spanish Fork?

If you have a dispute with a business contract in Spanish Fork, it is important to seek legal advice from an experienced business contract lawyer. The lawyer can help you understand your rights and obligations under the contract and advise you on the best course of action.

Business Contract Lawyer Spanish Fork Consultation

When you need help from a Business Contract Lawyer near Spanish Fork UT call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Spanish Fork, Utah

About Spanish Fork, Utah

Spanish Fork is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States. It is part of the Provo–Orem Metropolitan Statistical Area. The 2020 census reported a population of 42,602. Spanish Fork, Utah is the 20th largest city in Utah based on official 2017 estimates from the US Census Bureau.

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Business Law and Intellectual Property

Business Law and Intellectual Property

Business Law and Intellectual Property

“Protecting Your Ideas and Assets: Business Law and Intellectual Property Solutions”

Introduction

Business Law and Intellectual Property are two important areas of law that are essential for businesses to understand and comply with. Business Law covers a wide range of topics, including contracts, torts, employment law, and corporate law. Intellectual Property Law protects the rights of creators and inventors to their creations and inventions, such as copyrights, trademarks, and patents. Both of these areas of law are important for businesses to understand and comply with in order to protect their interests and ensure their success.

What to Do When Your Intellectual Property is Infringed Upon

When your intellectual property is infringed upon, it is important to take action quickly to protect your rights. Here are some steps you can take to protect your intellectual property:

1. Document the Infringement: Gather evidence of the infringement, such as screenshots, copies of the infringing material, and any other relevant information.

2. Contact the Infringer: Contact the person or company responsible for the infringement and explain the situation. Ask them to stop using your intellectual property and provide evidence of the infringement.

3. Send a Cease and Desist Letter: If the infringer does not respond to your initial contact, you may need to send a cease and desist letter. This letter should explain the infringement and demand that the infringer stop using your intellectual property.

4. Consider Legal Action: If the infringer does not comply with your cease and desist letter, you may need to take legal action. This could include filing a lawsuit or seeking an injunction to stop the infringement.

5. Monitor the Infringement: Even after taking action, it is important to monitor the infringement to ensure that it does not continue.

By taking these steps, you can protect your intellectual property and ensure that your rights are respected.

How to File for a Trademark and What to Expect During the Process

Filing for a trademark is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of the law and the ability to navigate the legal system. The process begins with a trademark search to ensure that the mark is not already in use. Once the search is complete, the applicant must file an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

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The application must include a description of the mark, the goods or services associated with the mark, and the applicant’s contact information. The application must also include a fee, which varies depending on the type of mark and the number of classes of goods or services associated with the mark.

Once the application is filed, the USPTO will review it to ensure that it meets all the requirements. If the application is approved, the mark will be published in the Official Gazette, a publication of the USPTO. This allows any interested parties to oppose the registration of the mark. If no opposition is filed, the mark will be registered and the applicant will receive a certificate of registration.

The entire process can take several months, depending on the complexity of the application and the number of oppositions filed. It is important to note that the registration of a trademark does not guarantee exclusive rights to the mark. The applicant must still take steps to protect the mark from infringement.

Filing for a trademark is a complex process, but with the right guidance and preparation, it can be a successful endeavor. Understanding the process and the requirements is essential to ensure that the application is successful.

Why Businesses Need to File for Copyrights

Businesses need to file for copyrights to protect their intellectual property from being used without permission. A copyright is a form of legal protection that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights to the use and distribution of that work. This includes the right to reproduce, distribute, display, and perform the work, as well as the right to create derivative works.

By filing for a copyright, businesses can ensure that their work is protected from unauthorized use. This is especially important for businesses that rely on their intellectual property for their livelihood. Without a copyright, anyone could use the work without permission, which could lead to lost profits and potential legal action.

In addition to protecting the work from unauthorized use, a copyright also provides businesses with the ability to monetize their work. By registering a copyright, businesses can license their work to others, allowing them to generate revenue from their intellectual property. This can be a great way for businesses to generate additional income and expand their reach.

Finally, filing for a copyright can also help businesses protect their brand. By registering a copyright, businesses can ensure that their work is associated with their brand and that any unauthorized use of the work is quickly identified and addressed. This can help businesses maintain their reputation and protect their brand from potential damage.

Overall, filing for a copyright is an important step for businesses that rely on their intellectual property. By registering a copyright, businesses can protect their work from unauthorized use, monetize their work, and protect their brand.

Business Trademarks with the United States Patent Office

Trademarks are an important part of any business. They are used to identify and distinguish a company’s goods and services from those of its competitors. The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is the federal agency responsible for registering trademarks.

The USPTO offers two types of trademark registration: Principal Register and Supplemental Register. A trademark registered on the Principal Register is given the highest level of protection under federal law. It is also eligible for use in foreign countries. A trademark registered on the Supplemental Register is not eligible for use in foreign countries, but it does provide some protection under federal law.

To register a trademark with the USPTO, an applicant must submit an application that includes a description of the mark, a drawing of the mark, and a list of the goods and services associated with the mark. The application must also include a statement of the applicant’s intent to use the mark in commerce.

Once the application is submitted, the USPTO will review it to determine if the mark is eligible for registration. If the mark is eligible, the USPTO will publish it in the Official Gazette, a weekly publication that lists all newly registered trademarks. After publication, any party who believes they may be damaged by the registration of the mark may file an opposition to the registration.

If no opposition is filed, or if the opposition is unsuccessful, the USPTO will issue a certificate of registration. This certificate serves as proof that the mark is registered and provides the owner with certain legal rights.

Trademark registration with the USPTO is an important step for any business. It provides protection for the company’s goods and services and helps to ensure that its brand is not infringed upon by competitors.

The Difference Between Patents Copyrights and Trademarks

Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all forms of intellectual property protection. Each type of protection serves a different purpose and offers different levels of protection.

Patents are a form of intellectual property protection that grants the inventor exclusive rights to make, use, and sell an invention. Patents are granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and are valid for a limited period of time, usually 20 years. In order to obtain a patent, the invention must be novel, useful, and non-obvious.

Copyrights are a form of intellectual property protection that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights to reproduce, distribute, and publicly display the work. Copyrights are granted by the United States Copyright Office and are valid for the life of the author plus 70 years.

Trademarks are a form of intellectual property protection that grants the owner exclusive rights to use a distinctive mark, phrase, or logo to identify their goods or services. Trademarks are granted by the USPTO and are valid as long as the mark is used in commerce.

In summary, patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all forms of intellectual property protection. Patents protect inventions, copyrights protect original works, and trademarks protect distinctive marks, phrases, and logos. Each type of protection offers different levels of protection and is granted by different government agencies.

How to Protect Your Business Assets with Intellectual Property Rights

Intellectual property rights are an important tool for protecting the assets of a business. These rights provide legal protection for the products, services, and ideas that a business creates. By understanding the different types of intellectual property rights and how to use them, businesses can ensure that their assets are protected.

The first type of intellectual property right is copyright. Copyright protects original works of authorship, such as books, music, and software. Copyright protection is automatic and lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years. To protect a work with copyright, businesses should include a copyright notice on the work and register the work with the U.S. Copyright Office.

The second type of intellectual property right is trademark. Trademarks protect words, symbols, and designs that identify a business’s products or services. Trademarks can be registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. To protect a trademark, businesses should use the trademark symbol (™) when referring to the trademarked product or service.

The third type of intellectual property right is patent. Patents protect inventions and processes. Patents can be registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. To protect a patent, businesses should include a patent notice on the invention or process and register the patent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Finally, trade secrets are a type of intellectual property right that protect confidential information. Trade secrets can include formulas, recipes, customer lists, and other information that is not generally known. To protect a trade secret, businesses should take steps to keep the information confidential, such as limiting access to the information and requiring employees to sign non-disclosure agreements.

By understanding the different types of intellectual property rights and how to use them, businesses can ensure that their assets are protected. By taking the necessary steps to protect their intellectual property, businesses can ensure that their products, services, and ideas remain secure.

Understanding the Basics of Intellectual Property Law

Intellectual property law is a complex and ever-evolving area of law that is designed to protect the rights of creators and inventors. It is important for individuals and businesses to understand the basics of intellectual property law in order to protect their creations and inventions.

Intellectual property law is divided into four main categories: copyright, trademark, patent, and trade secret. Each of these categories has its own set of rules and regulations that must be followed in order to protect the rights of the creator or inventor.

Copyright law protects original works of authorship, such as books, music, and artwork. Copyright protection is automatic and does not require registration. Copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years.

Trademark law protects words, symbols, and designs that are used to identify a product or service. Trademarks must be registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in order to be protected. Trademark protection lasts for 10 years and can be renewed indefinitely.

Patent law protects inventions and processes. Patents must be registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in order to be protected. Patent protection lasts for 20 years from the date of filing.

Trade secret law protects confidential information, such as formulas, recipes, and processes. Trade secrets must be kept confidential in order to be protected. Trade secret protection lasts as long as the information remains confidential.

It is important to understand the basics of intellectual property law in order to protect your creations and inventions. If you have any questions about intellectual property law, it is best to consult with an experienced attorney.

Protecting Your Business and IP Rights

As a business owner, it is important to protect your intellectual property (IP) rights. IP rights are the legal rights that protect your business’s creations, inventions, and other original works. These rights can include copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets.

Copyrights protect original works of authorship, such as books, music, and artwork. Trademarks protect words, phrases, symbols, or designs that identify and distinguish the source of goods or services. Patents protect inventions and processes. Trade secrets are confidential information that provides a business with a competitive advantage.

It is important to understand the different types of IP rights and how to protect them. Here are some tips for protecting your business’s IP rights:

1. Register your IP rights. Registering your IP rights with the appropriate government agency is the best way to protect them. This will give you the legal right to take action against anyone who infringes on your rights.

2. Use contracts. Use contracts to protect your IP rights when working with third parties. Make sure the contracts clearly define who owns the IP rights and what the third party can and cannot do with the IP.

3. Monitor your IP rights. Monitor your IP rights to make sure they are not being used without your permission. If you find someone infringing on your rights, take action to protect your IP.

4. Educate yourself. Educate yourself on the different types of IP rights and how to protect them. This will help you make informed decisions about protecting your IP rights.

By taking the necessary steps to protect your IP rights, you can ensure that your business’s creations and inventions are protected. This will help you maintain a competitive edge and ensure that your business is successful.

Q&A

Q1: What is business law?

A1: Business law is a body of law that governs the formation, operation, and dissolution of businesses. It covers a wide range of topics, including contracts, torts, property, and labor law. It also includes intellectual property, such as copyrights, trademarks, and patents.

Q2: What is intellectual property?

A2: Intellectual property is a type of property that is created by the mind or intellect. It includes creations such as inventions, literary and artistic works, symbols, names, images, and designs. Intellectual property is protected by law, such as copyright, trademark, and patent laws.

Q3: What is a copyright?

A3: A copyright is a form of intellectual property protection that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights to use and distribute the work. Copyright protection applies to literary, artistic, musical, and other creative works.

Q4: What is a trademark?

A4: A trademark is a form of intellectual property protection that grants the owner of a mark exclusive rights to use the mark in connection with goods or services. Trademarks can be words, symbols, or designs that distinguish the source of goods or services.

Q5: What is a patent?

A5: A patent is a form of intellectual property protection that grants the inventor of an invention exclusive rights to make, use, and sell the invention. Patents are granted for inventions that are novel, useful, and non-obvious.

Q6: What is a trade secret?

A6: A trade secret is a form of intellectual property protection that grants the owner of a secret exclusive rights to use the secret in connection with goods or services. Trade secrets can include formulas, patterns, compilations, programs, devices, methods, techniques, or processes.

Q7: What is a non-disclosure agreement?

A7: A non-disclosure agreement (NDA) is a contract between two or more parties that sets out the terms and conditions for the sharing of confidential information. An NDA is used to protect confidential information from being disclosed to third parties.

Q8: What is a licensing agreement?

A8: A licensing agreement is a contract between two or more parties that sets out the terms and conditions for the use of intellectual property. A licensing agreement grants the licensee the right to use the intellectual property in exchange for payment or other consideration.

Business Law and Intellectual Property Consultation

When you need legal help with Business Law and Intellectual Property call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Transactional Law

Transactional Law

Transactional law is a branch of law that deals with the resolution of disputes and the enforcement of contracts between parties. It involves the negotiation, drafting, and review of business contracts, agreements, and other legal documents. It also involves providing legal advice to clients on a wide range of business and corporate matters. Transactional lawyers engage in activities such as real estate transactions, mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, tax and estate planning, and intellectual property (IP) rights.

Transactional attorneys must have a good understanding of general business law, corporate law, and IP law. They must be able to negotiate and draft contractual agreements, as well as provide legal advice on the various aspects of the transaction. Additionally, they must be familiar with the laws and regulations governing the particular transaction.

Transactional law is an area of law that is constantly evolving and requires attorneys to keep up with the latest developments in the field. As such, transactional lawyers must possess strong skills in research, analysis, communication, and negotiation.

Transactional Law Overview

Transactional law is the branch of law that deals with the resolution of disputes and the enforcement of contracts between parties. It involves the negotiation, drafting, and review of legal documents related to business transactions. Transactional law is a broad field that encompasses a wide range of areas, such as corporate law, commercial law, real estate law, tax law, estate planning, and intellectual property (IP) law.

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Transactional lawyers are responsible for providing legal advice to clients on a variety of business matters. These may include the formation of businesses, the negotiation of contracts, the filing of legal documents, the protection of intellectual property rights, and the resolution of disputes. Transactional lawyers must have a good understanding of the laws and regulations relevant to each transaction. They must also possess strong skills in research, analysis, communication, and negotiation.

Transactional attorneys must be familiar with the various types of transactions that may be involved in a business. These may include mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, tax and estate planning, and intellectual property rights. Additionally, they must have a good understanding of the different types of agreements and contracts that may be used in the transaction.

Transactional attorneys must also be aware of the different types of litigation that may arise in the course of a transaction. These may include contract disputes, property disputes, and intellectual property disputes. Transactional attorneys must be familiar with the applicable laws and regulations related to the transaction, as well as the legal documents that may be necessary to complete the transaction.

Business Transaction In Context

Commercial transactions are the backbone of any successful business. They involve the exchange of goods, services, and money between two or more parties. Commercial transactions are one of the most important components of a business, and they must be carefully managed to ensure the success of the business.

Businesses that engage in commercial transactions must consider a number of factors, including the type of goods or services being exchanged, the terms of the transaction, the quality of the goods or services, and the legal and regulatory requirements that must be met. The transaction must be in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations to ensure the protection of both parties involved. Commercial transactions also involve the negotiation of payment terms, such as the amount, timing, and method of payment, as well as any applicable taxes or fees that must be paid.

The parties involved in a commercial transaction may also need to consider other factors, such as the security of the transaction, the protection of personal information, and the protection of confidential information. Additionally, the parties involved should have a clear understanding of any warranties, guarantees, or other contractual obligations associated with the transaction.

In addition to the parties involved in the transaction, the transaction may involve third parties, such as banks, credit card companies, or other financial institutions. These third parties may need to be involved in the transaction to facilitate the payment process, provide financial security, or provide other services.

The parties involved in a commercial transaction must also think about the risks associated with the transaction. This includes considering the potential for fraud, breach of contract, or other legal issues. The parties should also consider any potential liabilities that may arise from the transaction, such as if the goods or services are not delivered as promised or the payment is not received.

I’ve often said that businesses must consider the implications of the transaction on their reputation. Customers must feel that they can rely on the business to provide quality goods and services and to honor its obligations. A business must ensure that the commercial transaction is conducted in an ethical and professional manner in order to protect its reputation and ensure the success of the business. Sometimes this might sound contrite; however, with the world we are living in now that is so connected, we have to consider these things.

Transactional Law Services

Transactional attorneys provide a wide range of services to their clients. These may include the negotiation and drafting of contractual agreements, the filing of legal documents, the protection of intellectual property rights, the resolution of disputes, and the provision of legal advice on a variety of business matters.

Transactional attorneys may also provide services related to the formation of businesses, mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, and tax and estate planning. Additionally, they may provide services related to intellectual property rights, such as the protection of trademarks, copyrights, and patents.

Transactional attorneys may also provide services related to the negotiation and drafting of contractual agreements. These may include confidentiality agreements, lease agreements, and merger agreements. Additionally, they may provide legal advice on the various aspects of the transaction, such as the legal fees, the tax implications, and the potential risks associated with the transaction.

Transactional attorneys are also involved in the resolution of disputes. This may involve negotiating settlements, filing lawsuits, or representing clients in court proceedings. Furthermore, they may also provide legal advice on the various legal issues that may arise in the course of the transaction.

Latest Developments in Transactional Law

Transactional law is a complex and ever-evolving field of law. Transactional attorneys must possess strong skills in research, analysis, communication, and negotiation. Additionally, they must be familiar with the various types of business transactions, contractual agreements, and legal documents that may be necessary in the transaction. They must also be familiar with the laws and regulations governing the transaction.

In 2022, Utah has been at the forefront of developments in transactional law. The state has been actively working to improve the legal landscape for businesses and other entities involved in transactions and contracts. To this end, the Utah Legislative Session has passed a number of bills that will help make the transactional law process simpler and more efficient. These include a bill that creates a new, simpler form for contracts, as well as one that requires all contracts to be signed electronically. The state has also updated its Uniform Commercial Code to provide more clarity and uniformity on the law governing commercial transactions.

In addition, the Utah Supreme Court has issued a number of decisions that have furthered the development of transactional law in the state. These decisions include clarifying the interpretation of the Uniform Commercial Code, as well as providing guidance on the enforcement of contractual terms. The court has also provided guidance on how to interpret and enforce contracts that involve intellectual property and other intangible assets.

The new laws and court decisions have helped to create a more harmonious and efficient legal landscape for those involved in transactional law in Utah. This has enabled businesses to more easily conduct their transactions and contracts, while also providing greater protection to those involved. In addition, these developments have helped to spur further investment and economic growth in the state.

Transactional attorneys provide a wide range of services to their clients, including the negotiation and drafting of contractual agreements, the filing of legal documents, the protection of intellectual property rights, the resolution of disputes, and the provision of legal advice on a variety of business matters. Transactional attorneys must have a good understanding of general business law, corporate law, and IP law.

Transactional law is an important field of law that requires attorneys to be up-to-date on the latest developments in the field. As such, transactional lawyers must possess the necessary skills and experience in order to effectively represent their clients in business transactions.

Transactional Law Attorney Consultation

When you need legal help with transactional law in Utah, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property (IP) is a term used to describe the legal rights that protect the interests of creators of intellectual works. It encompasses the legal and ethical rights associated with the creation and ownership of ideas, inventions, and works of authorship. It is the protection of inventions, artistic works, symbols, names, and other intangible assets, and the right to prevent others from using them without permission. IP rights are important to individuals, businesses, and governments, and are a key component of the global economy.

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Definition of Intellectual Property

Intellectual property (IP) is a legal concept that gives individuals and businesses the right to use, sell, and protect the products of their creativity or invention. It is defined by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) as “the legal rights which result from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary and artistic fields.” IP is a form of property and can be divided into two broad categories: industrial property, which includes inventions (patents), trademarks, industrial designs, and trade secrets; and copyright, which includes literary and artistic works such as novels, movies, music, and computer software. Registered Trade Marks are a part of intellectual property law.

IP rights are essential for protecting those who produce intellectual works from the unauthorized use or exploitation of those works by others. These rights are the legal means to ensure that creators are adequately compensated for the use of their works. IP rights allow creators to control how their works are used and how they are compensated for their creations, as well as to protect their creations from unauthorized use.

Use of US Case Law

In the United States, case law regarding intellectual property is established through the judicial system. The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States and is the final arbiter of federal law. The Supreme Court hears appeals of cases decided in the lower federal courts and state courts, and its decisions are binding on all parties in all jurisdictions.

One example of a case involving intellectual property is the case of Mattel v. MGA Entertainment. This case concerned the Bratz Dolls, a line of fashion dolls produced by MGA Entertainment. Mattel alleged that MGA had infringed on its copyright by using features of Mattel’s iconic Barbie Dolls in the design of the Bratz Dolls. This case was ultimately decided in favor of Mattel, with the Supreme Court awarding Mattel damages of over $100 million.

The case of Mattel v. MGA Entertainment illustrates the importance of intellectual property laws. It highlights the need for businesses to protect their intellectual works from infringement, as well as the need for businesses to properly license their works and to ensure that they receive adequate compensation for their creations.

Trademarks

The trademark is a sign, symbol or image that identifies a product or service and distinguishes it from other related products or services. It is a form of intellectual property protection granted to the owner of the trademark by thegovernment. Trademarks can be registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the registration process includes a review of the trademark to ensure that it is not confusingly similar to a trademark already registered by another party. This process is important to ensure that consumers are not confused when they purchase products or services and to protect the owner of a trademark from infringement by another party.

We’re going to look at the recent case of United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V., 140 S. Ct. 2298, 2020 USPQ 2d 10729; 2020 WL 3518365 (June 30, 2020). In the case of United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V., 140 S. Ct. 2298, 2020 USPQ 2d 10729; 2020 WL 3518365 (June 30, 2020), the Supreme Court of the United States addressed the question of whether the trademark BOOKING.COM could be registered with the USPTO. The Court held that the trademark could be registered because it was not confusingly similar to any other registered trademark. This case is important because it clarifies the circumstances under which a trademark can be registered and provides guidance to businesses seeking to protect their trademarks. I will outline here the importance of trademark registration, the legal principles involved in determining whether a trademark is eligible for registration and how the Supreme Court’s decision in the Booking.com case affects the registration of trademarks.

Importance of Trademark Registration

Trademark registration is a valuable form of legal protection for businesses. It allows them to protect their products or services from being used by another party without the consent of the owner of the trademark. A trademark can be registered with the USPTO and the registration process includes a review of the trademark to ensure that it is not confusingly similar to a trademark already registered by another party. This is important because it ensures that consumers are not confused when they purchase products or services and to protect the owner of a trademark from infringement by another party.

Legal Principles Involved in Trademark Registration

Trademarks are protected by the federal Lanham Act, which provides that a trademark is eligible for registration if it is distinctive or if it has acquired distinctiveness through long and exclusive use. A trademark is distinctive if it is capable of distinguishing the goods or services of the owner of the trademark from the goods or services of others. A trademark can also be distinctive if it has acquired distinctiveness through long and exclusive use, meaning that the trademark has been in use for a period of time and has become associated with the goods or services of the owner of the trademark.

The USPTO also considers the likelihood of confusion when determining whether a trademark is eligible for registration. The USPTO will consider whether the trademark is similar to another trademark already registered by another party, and if the trademark is deemed to be confusingly similar, then it will not be eligible for registration.

The Booking.com Case

In the case of United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V., 140 S. Ct. 2298, 2020 USPQ 2d 10729; 2020 WL 3518365 (June 30, 2020), the Supreme Court of the United States addressed the question of whether the trademark BOOKING.COM could be registered with the USPTO. The Court held that the trademark could be registered because it was not confusingly similar to any other registered trademark.

The Court’s decision in the Booking.com case is important because it clarifies the circumstances under which a trademark can be registered. The Court held that a trademark is eligible for registration if it is distinctive or has acquired distinctiveness through long and exclusive use, and if it is not confusingly similar to any other registered trademark. This decision provides guidance to businesses seeking to protect their trademarks and ensures that consumers are not confused when they purchase products or services.

As outlined herein, trademarks are an important form of intellectual property protection for businesses, and the registration process can be complex and requires careful consideration. The case of United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V., 140 S. Ct. 2298, 2020 USPQ 2d 10729; 2020 WL 3518365 (June 30, 2020) clarified the circumstances under which a trademark can be registered and provides guidance to businesses seeking to protect their trademarks. The Court held that a trademark is eligible for registration if it is distinctive or has acquired distinctiveness through long and exclusive use, and if it is not confusingly similar to any other registered trademark. This decision ensures that consumers are not confused when they purchase products or services, and provides a framework for businesses to protect their trademarks.

Trade Secrets

Trade secrets are another form of intellectual property. Trade secrets are confidential information that is not generally known to the public and that gives the owner of the secret an economic advantage over competitors. Trade secrets are typically protected under state laws, and the penalties for misappropriating trade secrets can be severe.

For example, in the case of Abbott v. Utility Air Regulatory Group, the Supreme Court held that the federal government could regulate emissions from stationary sources, such as power plants, under the Clean Air Act. The court also held that trade secrets could be protected from disclosure under the act. This case illustrates the importance of trade secrets in the context of environmental regulation and the need for businesses to take steps to protect their trade secrets from unauthorized disclosure.

Definition of Trade Secrets

Trade secrets are confidential information or processes that are not generally known to the public and that provide a business with a competitive advantage. The case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90 is an important legal case that provides an insight into the protection of trade secrets and the importance of ensuring that confidential information is adequately protected. This essay will analyse the case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90, examining the legal principles and issues that arose in the case and discussing the implications of the case for businesses seeking to protect their trade secrets.

Facts of the General Water Technologies Trade Secrets Case

The case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90 was heard in the Utah Court of Appeals. The case involved a dispute between General Water Technologies (GWT) and Van Zweden, the former Chief Technology Officer for GWT. GWT alleged that Van Zweden had misappropriated trade secrets in the form of customer lists and technical documents. GWT had given Van Zweden access to the confidential customer lists and documents as part of his role as Chief Technology Officer. However, after leaving GWT, Van Zweden had used the customer lists and documents to try to solicit business for his own company. GWT alleged that this constituted a breach of contract and the misappropriation of trade secrets.

Legal Principles

The court in the case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90 had to consider the legal principles relating to the protection of trade secrets. The court noted that the Utah Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA) provides protection for trade secrets, defining trade secrets as “information, including a formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique, or process, that derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable by proper means by, other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure or use.” The court also noted that under the UTSA, a person can be held liable for misappropriation of trade secrets if they “improperly acquire” a trade secret or “disclose or use” a trade secret in a manner that would “breach a duty of confidentiality” that has arisen out of a contract or other relationship.

The court also noted that the UTSA provides for the award of damages for the misappropriation of trade secrets. These damages may include “actual loss caused by the misappropriation” or “unjust enrichment caused by the misappropriation”. The court also noted that the UTSA provides for the award of punitive damages in cases of “willful and malicious misappropriation”.

Decision of the Court

The court in the case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90 found in favour of GWT. The court found that the customer lists and technical documents constituted trade secrets under the UTSA, as they had economic value that was derived from not being generally known to the public. The court also held that Van Zweden had breached a duty of confidentiality by using the customer lists and documents to solicit business for his own company. The court also found that Van Zweden had acted willfully and maliciously, and was therefore liable for punitive damages.

Implications of the Case

The case of General Water Technologies v. Van Zweden 2022 UT App 90 is an important legal case that provides an insight into the protection of trade secrets and the importance of ensuring that confidential information is adequately protected. The case demonstrates the legal principles that apply to the protection of trade secrets, and the potential consequences of misappropriation. The case highlights the importance of businesses taking steps to ensure that their trade secrets are adequately protected, to avoid the possibility of misappropriation.

Intellectual Property Protection For Businesses

In conclusion, intellectual property is a critical component of the global economy. It gives individuals and businesses the right to use, sell, and protect the products of their creativity or invention. It also serves to protect creators from unauthorized use or exploitation of their works by others. Trade secrets are also an important form of intellectual property and can be protected under state and federal laws. The case of Mattel v. MGA Entertainment illustrates the importance of intellectual property laws and the need for businesses to protect their intellectual works from infringement.

Utah Intellectual Property Consultation

When you need legal help with Intellectual Property, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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