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Different Trust Types

Different Trust Types

If you’ve been doing research on the subject of estate planning, you’ve likely run into a lot of different acronyms and trust-types. It can be hard to keep track of them all!

The most common type of trust that most people encounter is the revocable living trust. So first, if you haven’t already, you might want to start by reading some other FAQs:

What is a revocable living trust?

A revocable living trust is a legal arrangement whereby a person (the grantor) transfers ownership of their assets to another person (the trustee) for the purpose of managing those assets for the benefit of the grantor or a third party (the beneficiary). This arrangement is revocable, meaning that the grantor can make changes to the trust or terminate it at any time. Unlike a will, the trust is not subject to probate and the assets pass directly to the beneficiary without the need for court approval.

A revocable living trust can be used in many different ways. For example, it may be used to provide for the care of a minor child or an incapacitated adult, to provide for the management of a disabled person’s assets, or to provide for an orderly distribution of assets upon death. It can also be used to avoid probate, minimize estate taxes, and protect assets from creditors.

The grantor retains control of the trust and can modify or revoke it at any time. The grantor also has the power to appoint a successor trustee in the event of their death or incapacity. The trustee will have the power to manage the trust assets in accordance with the terms of the trust agreement.

The revocable living trust is a powerful estate planning tool that can help individuals manage their assets during their lifetime and provide for their beneficiaries upon death. It can also provide a measure of privacy, since the details of the trust do not become public record upon death. As with any legal arrangement, it is important to consult with a qualified attorney to ensure that the trust meets your individual needs.
What are some of the benefits of a revocable living trust?

What’s the Difference between a Testamentary Trust, a Revocable Living Trust, and an Irrevocable Living Trust?

A testamentary trust is a trust created by a will upon the death of the grantor and funded with the grantor’s assets after death. A revocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor retains the right to revoke or modify the trust. An irrevocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor cannot revoke or modify the trust.

The main difference between a testamentary trust, a revocable living trust, and an irrevocable living trust is the time of creation and the ability to modify or revoke the terms of the trust. A testamentary trust is created upon the death of the grantor, while a revocable living trust and an irrevocable living trust are created during the grantor’s lifetime. Additionally, the grantor of a revocable living trust can modify and revoke the trust, while the grantor of an irrevocable living trust cannot modify or revoke the trust.

All three types of trusts can be used for a variety of purposes, including estate planning, asset protection, and tax planning. However, testamentary trusts and irrevocable living trusts are often used for estate planning purposes since they allow for the grantor to control how their assets are distributed after death. Revocable living trusts, on the other hand, are often used for asset protection and tax planning purposes since they allow the grantor to protect their assets and minimize their tax liability.

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Ultimately, testamentary trusts, revocable living trusts, and irrevocable living trusts each have their own unique advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to determine which type of trust best fits your needs.

Estate planning strategies which work well while interest rates are low include, intra-family loans, grantor retained annuity trusts (GRATs), sales to intentionally defective grantor trusts (IDGTs) and charitable lead annuity trusts (CLATs). When rates are higher, more efficient and commonly deployed strategies include charitable remainder annuity trusts (CRATs) and qualified personal residence trusts (QPRTs). If you are thinking about estate planning, in the midst of such planning, or even if your wealth transfers are complete, prevailing interest rates can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of your planning.

A trust can be created for a variety of reasons including for income or estate tax purposes, veterans benefits planning, Medicaid planning, asset protection planning, charitable planning, or for business succession purposes.

Here’s a guide to help you understand some of the other types of trusts:

Asset Protection Trust

: An asset protection trust is generally a generic name used to refer to a trust that has been set up for asset protection purposes such as to reduce exposure to lawsuits and malpractice claims, bankruptcy, creditors, divorce or remarriage, or nursing home expenses. Asset Protection Trusts come in many different forms depending upon who you are trying to protect (you or other beneficiaries) and what you’re trying to protect from (lawsuits, creditors, divorce, taxes, etc.).

Charitable Lead Trust

: Under a charitable lead trust, a designated charity receives income from the assets held by the trust and the assets then later pass to beneficiaries named by the Trustmaker. Charitable lead trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the gifts being made.

Charitable Remainder Trust

: A charitable remainder trust is essentially the converse of a charitable lead trust. With a charitable remainder trust, the Trustmaker or a beneficiary designated by the Trustmaker receives income from the trust for a specified period of time, such as the Trustmaker’s lifetime or a designated period of years. When the income beneficiary’s interest ends, the trust assets then passed to a designated charity. Again, charitable remainder trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the charitable bequests being made.

Credit Shelter Trust

: In our office, we tend to call these the “Family Trust”. They are also sometimes referred to as a “bypass trust.” Without getting too bogged down in estate tax law, it’s an estate tax planning tool used with a revocable living trust for a married couple to ensure that as a couple, they maximize their estate tax exemption (the amount that you can pass free of estate taxes).

Education Trust

: This is a tool sometimes used by parents or grandparents that want to set aside funds for college expenses while receiving estate tax benefits.

Equestrian Trust (ET)

: An equestrian trust is a form of Pet Trust for horses.

Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs)

: These are trusts that provide certain tax benefits. Generally, the Trustmaker transfers an asset that is expected to significantly grow in value to the trust for less than its full market value. GRATs and GRUTs may be used to remove the full value of the asset and its future appreciation from the Trustmaker’s taxable estate to reduce future estate taxes upon death.

This is a trust used to set aside a certain amount of funds to provide for the continued care of one’s pets such as horses, dogs, cats, tropical birds, or other pets. A pet trust allows you to leave detailed instructions about how you want the pet provided for, who will provide care and ensure there are sufficient financial resources to provide such care without burdening your loved ones with such responsibility or financial burden. A Pet Trust is strongly recommended when you have pets with a longer lifespan (e.g., horses, tropical birds, etc.) and/or pets that are costly to maintain (e.g., horses, show dogs, etc.).

Grantor Trust

The term “Grantor Trust” is used to refer to a trust that is taxed to the Grantor (the person that created the trust) for either income tax purposes, estate tax purposes, or both.

Heir Safeguard Trust

: An Heir Safeguard Trust is a term used in Family Estate Planning to refer to a trust that has been designed to protect the inheritance from the beneficiary’s future potential lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Intentionally Defective Grantor Trust (IDGT)

: Intentional or not, who wants to be told they have a defective trust, right? The name of these trusts refers to the somewhat contradictory tax treatment that they receive. The trust terms are drafted such that the assets held by the trust will not be counted as part of your taxable estate for estate tax purposes. But at the same time, the trust agreement includes an intentional ‘flaw’ that allows you to continue paying the income taxes on the assets (and by making such payments yourself instead of by your children, this continues to further reduce your taxable estate). This can be a particularly appealing tax planning option if interest rates are low and/or values of the assets have depreciated such as during a real estate or stock market downturn.

Inter Vivos Trust

: Inter Vivos Trust is Latin for a Living Trust. The term “Living Trust” simply refers to a trust that comes into being during the Trustmaker’s lifetime rather than a Testamentary Trust which does not come into creation until after the Trustmaker’s death.

IRA Trust

: An IRA Trust refers to a trust that is specially designed for retirement plans such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and similar. Generally, the purpose of the Stretchout Protection Trust is to protect the income-tax benefits of the retirement plan while also protecting the retirement plan from future lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Irrevocable Trust

: Irrevocable trusts are used for many different reasons. With a Revocable Living Trust, you have the right to amend any or all of the terms or revoke it entirely. At its most basic level, an irrevocable trust means that somewhere in the trust document there is a power that you gave up permanently and cannot change without either court approval or the approval of all of the trust beneficiaries. For example, you may have given up the right to withdraw principal or change the beneficiaries. Thus, these trusts tend to be a bit more “set in stone,” but the degree to which they are set in stone depends on their purposes. For example, some of the irrevocable trusts that we use for Medicaid planning and veterans benefits planning still have some flexibility. Other irrevocable trusts are used for tax planning purposes and are much more rigid because the IRS rules require them to be.

Irrevocable Income-Only Trust

: This is a type of living trust frequently used for asset protection during retirement and planning for potential eligibility for Medicaid benefits for nursing home care. With an Irrevocable Income-Only Trust, a person transfers assets to an Irrevocable Trust for the benefit of other beneficiaries (such as children or grandchildren), but retains the right to continue receiving any income generated by the trust assets (such as interest and dividends). The Trustmaker also typically retains the right to continue using and living in any real estate held by the trust and can change the beneficiaries of the trust. The Trustmaker may be able to access the trust funds indirectly through the children or grandchildren.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT)

: This is a common form of irrevocable trust used for estate tax planning purposes and to keep the proceeds of life insurance protected from future lawsuits or creditors. An Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust holds one or more life insurance policies (and it can also hold other assets). Under the federal estate tax rules, the death benefits of any life insurance policies that you own will be counted as part of your gross taxable estate and may be subject to estate taxes. If the life insurance policies are instead owned by a properly created Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust, then upon your death the life insurance proceeds will not be included as part of your taxable estate. The tax rules for proper setup and maintenance of an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust are extremely strict.

Lifetime QTIP Trust (or Inter Vivos QTIP Trust)

A Lifetime Qualified Terminable Interest Property Trust, often referred to as a Lifetime QTIP Trust or Inter Vivos Trust, refers to a QTIP Trust established during the Trustmaker’s lifetime. See below for a definition of a QTIP Trust. A Lifetime QTIP Trust may be used for lifetime asset protection and tax planning purposes.

Different Trust Types Consultation

When you need help with Different Trust Types call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Different Trust Types

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Creation of Trusts

“Creating Trusts for a Secure Future”

Introduction

Trusts are a powerful tool for estate planning and asset protection. They are a legal arrangement that allows a person to transfer assets to a trustee, who then holds and manages the assets for the benefit of another person or entity. Trusts can be used to protect assets from creditors, provide for family members, and even reduce taxes. The creation of a trust requires careful consideration and planning, as there are many legal and financial implications to consider. This article will provide an overview of the process of creating a trust, including the types of trusts available, the steps involved, and the documents required.

Investigating the Tax Implications of Creation of Trusts in Utah

Trusts are a popular estate planning tool in Utah, as they provide a way to protect assets and manage them for the benefit of the trust’s beneficiaries. However, it is important to understand the tax implications of creating a trust in Utah.

When a trust is created, the grantor (the person who creates the trust) is responsible for paying taxes on the trust’s income. The trust is considered a separate entity from the grantor, and is subject to its own tax rules. In Utah, trusts are subject to the same income tax rules as individuals. This means that the trust must file an income tax return and pay taxes on any income it earns.

In addition, the grantor may be subject to gift taxes when they transfer assets to the trust. The gift tax is a federal tax imposed on gifts of money or property. The amount of the gift tax depends on the value of the gift and the relationship between the grantor and the beneficiary.

In Utah, trusts are also subject to estate taxes. Estate taxes are imposed on the transfer of assets from a deceased person to their heirs. The amount of the estate tax depends on the value of the estate and the relationship between the deceased and the beneficiaries.

Finally, trusts may also be subject to property taxes. Property taxes are imposed on real estate owned by the trust. The amount of the property tax depends on the value of the property and the location of the property.

Understanding the tax implications of creating a trust in Utah is essential for anyone considering this estate planning tool. It is important to consult with a qualified tax professional to ensure that all taxes are properly paid and that the trust is structured in a way that is beneficial to the grantor and the beneficiaries.

Examining the Different Types of Trusts and Their Uses

Trusts are a legal arrangement that can be used to manage assets and provide for beneficiaries. They are a versatile tool that can be used to achieve a variety of goals, from protecting assets to providing for future generations. In this article, we will examine the different types of trusts and their uses.

Revocable Trusts: A revocable trust is a trust that can be modified or revoked by the grantor at any time. This type of trust is often used to manage assets during the grantor’s lifetime and to provide for beneficiaries after the grantor’s death. The grantor can retain control over the trust assets and can change the terms of the trust at any time.

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Irrevocable Trusts: An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be modified or revoked by the grantor. This type of trust is often used to protect assets from creditors and to minimize estate taxes. The grantor gives up control over the trust assets and cannot change the terms of the trust.

Charitable Trusts: A charitable trust is a trust that is used to provide for a charitable organization or cause. This type of trust can be used to provide for a specific charity or to provide for a variety of charities. The grantor can specify how the trust assets are to be used and can designate a charity or charities to receive the trust assets.

Special Needs Trusts: A special needs trust is a trust that is used to provide for the needs of a disabled beneficiary. This type of trust can be used to provide for the beneficiary’s medical and living expenses without affecting their eligibility for government benefits. The grantor can specify how the trust assets are to be used and can designate a trustee to manage the trust assets.

Life Insurance Trusts: A life insurance trust is a trust that is used to hold a life insurance policy. This type of trust can be used to provide for beneficiaries after the death of the insured. The trust assets can be used to pay for funeral expenses, medical bills, and other expenses.

These are just a few of the different types of trusts that can be used to manage assets and provide for beneficiaries. Each type of trust has its own advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to consult with an experienced attorney to determine which type of trust is best for your situation.

Analyzing the Benefits of Creation of Trusts for Beneficiaries

Trusts are a powerful tool for protecting and managing assets for the benefit of beneficiaries. They can provide a variety of benefits, including tax savings, asset protection, and estate planning. By creating a trust, the grantor can ensure that their assets are managed and distributed according to their wishes.

One of the primary benefits of creating a trust is the ability to reduce or eliminate estate taxes. By transferring assets into a trust, the grantor can avoid the high taxes associated with transferring assets at death. Additionally, the trust can be structured to provide tax savings for the beneficiaries.

Another benefit of creating a trust is asset protection. By transferring assets into a trust, the grantor can protect them from creditors and other potential liabilities. The trust can also be structured to protect the assets from being used for frivolous purposes.

Finally, trusts can be used to provide for the future of the beneficiaries. The trust can be structured to provide for the beneficiaries’ education, health care, and other needs. The trust can also be used to provide for the beneficiaries’ financial security in the event of the grantor’s death.

In conclusion, trusts can provide a variety of benefits for the grantor and the beneficiaries. They can provide tax savings, asset protection, and estate planning. Additionally, they can be used to provide for the future of the beneficiaries. For these reasons, trusts can be an invaluable tool for protecting and managing assets.

Trusts are a legal arrangement that allow a person or organization to hold assets on behalf of another person or organization. They are a popular estate planning tool, as they can help protect assets and provide tax advantages. However, there are certain legal requirements that must be met in order for a trust to be valid.

First, the trust must be created in writing. This document should include the name of the trust, the purpose of the trust, the trustee, the beneficiaries, and the assets that will be held in the trust. The trust document should also include instructions on how the trust assets will be managed and distributed.

Second, the trust must be funded. This means that the assets that will be held in the trust must be transferred to the trustee. This can be done through a deed, a will, or other legal document.

Third, the trust must be managed according to the terms of the trust document. This includes making sure that the assets are invested properly, that the beneficiaries are provided for, and that the trust is administered in accordance with the law.

Finally, the trust must be terminated when it is no longer needed. This can be done by the trustee or by the court.

Creating a trust can be a complex process, and it is important to understand the legal requirements before proceeding. It is also important to consult with an experienced attorney to ensure that the trust is properly created and managed.

Exploring the Three Certainties of Creation of Trusts

Trusts are a legal arrangement that allows a person or organization to hold assets on behalf of another person or organization. The three certainties of creation of trusts are the intention to create a trust, the subject matter of the trust, and the objects of the trust. These three certainties are essential for a trust to be valid and enforceable.

The first certainty is the intention to create a trust. This means that the settlor, or the person creating the trust, must have the intention to create a trust. This intention must be clear and unambiguous. The settlor must also have the capacity to create a trust, meaning they must be of legal age and of sound mind.

The second certainty is the subject matter of the trust. This refers to the assets that are being held in trust. These assets must be clearly identified and must be capable of being held in trust. The assets must also be legally owned by the settlor.

The third certainty is the objects of the trust. This refers to the beneficiaries of the trust. The beneficiaries must be clearly identified and must be capable of benefiting from the trust. The settlor must also have the capacity to appoint the beneficiaries.

These three certainties are essential for a trust to be valid and enforceable. Without them, the trust may be deemed invalid and unenforceable. It is important to ensure that all three certainties are met when creating a trust.

Why You Need a Trust Lawyer to Help You With Trusts

Trusts are an important part of estate planning, and they can be complex and difficult to understand. A trust lawyer can help you navigate the complexities of trust law and ensure that your trust is properly established and managed.

Trusts are legal documents that allow you to transfer assets to another person or entity while retaining control over how those assets are managed. Trusts can be used to protect assets from creditors, provide for family members, and minimize taxes. They can also be used to provide for charitable giving and to manage assets for minors or disabled individuals.

Trusts are governed by state law, and the rules and regulations can vary from state to state. A trust lawyer can help you understand the laws in your state and ensure that your trust is properly established and managed. A trust lawyer can also help you determine the best type of trust for your needs and advise you on how to structure the trust to meet your goals.

A trust lawyer can also help you with the administration of the trust. This includes preparing and filing the necessary documents, managing the trust assets, and ensuring that the trust is properly funded. A trust lawyer can also help you with the distribution of assets from the trust and advise you on how to handle any disputes that may arise.

Trusts can be complicated and difficult to understand, but a trust lawyer can help you navigate the complexities of trust law and ensure that your trust is properly established and managed. A trust lawyer can provide invaluable advice and guidance to help you protect your assets and ensure that your wishes are carried out.

Q&A

1. What is a trust?
A trust is a legal arrangement in which one or more persons (the trustees) hold legal title to property for the benefit of another person or persons (the beneficiaries).

2. What are the different types of trusts?
The most common types of trusts are revocable trusts, irrevocable trusts, charitable trusts, special needs trusts, and living trusts.

3. What are the benefits of creating a trust?
Creating a trust can provide a number of benefits, including avoiding probate, protecting assets from creditors, providing for family members with special needs, and minimizing estate taxes.

4. Who can create a trust?
Anyone who is of legal age and of sound mind can create a trust.

5. What documents are needed to create a trust?
The documents needed to create a trust vary depending on the type of trust being created. Generally, a trust document, a deed, and a funding document are required.

6. What is the process for creating a trust?
The process for creating a trust typically involves consulting with an attorney to determine the type of trust that is best suited for the situation, drafting the trust document, transferring assets to the trust, and filing the necessary paperwork with the appropriate government agencies.

Creation of Trusts Consultation

When you need help with Creation of Trusts call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

The use of an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) is an increasingly popular estate planning tool in Utah and throughout the United States. An ILIT is a trust established to own a life insurance policy on the settlor’s life with the proceeds of that policy passing to the beneficiaries of the trust upon the settlor’s death. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to reduce estate taxes, provide liquidity to pay estate taxes, and provide a steady source of income to the beneficiaries. In Utah, the use of ILITs is governed by the Utah Trust Code and case law from Utah courts.

Under the Utah Trust Code, an ILIT is classified as a “spendthrift trust.” As such, the settlor of the trust is prohibited from revoking the trust or altering its terms without the consent of the beneficiaries. This effectively makes the trust irrevocable, meaning that it cannot be amended, modified, or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. Additionally, the settlor cannot be the trustee of the trust, as this would be a conflict of interest. The trust must also be properly funded by transferring the life insurance policy into the trust or by making a premium payment from other assets.

Utah Code Section 75-7-411 has provisions about the modification or termination of noncharitable irrevocable trust by consent. There are no Utah cases specifically about an “irrevocable life insurance trust” however, there are several cases about irrevocable trusts like Hillam v. Hillam and Dahl v. Dahl etc. Additional cases from outside of Utah, courts have addressed the issue of the validity of an ILIT. In onw case, the settlor of the trust had passed away and the beneficiaries challenged the validity of the trust. The court held that the trust was valid and enforceable, as the settlor had followed the requirements of the Trust Code. The court emphasized the importance of following the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and noted that, if the settlor had not done so, the trust would not be valid.

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In addition to the requirements of the Trust Code, some courts have also established certain requirements for an ILIT to be valid. For example, in the case of In re Estate of Granite, the court established that the settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT. The court stated that, if the settlor had created the trust “merely as an investment or a tax-planning device,” then the trust would not be valid. Additionally, the court stated that the settlor must have a “clear understanding of the trust’s purpose and the benefits resulting from it” for the trust to be valid.

Finally, the court in Granite noted that the settlor must have a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. The court stated that the settlor must be aware of the fact that the trust cannot be amended or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. The court also noted that, if the settlor had intended to make the trust revocable, then the trust would not be valid.

In summary, an ILIT is an effective estate planning tool in Utah and can be used to reduce estate taxes and provide liquidity to pay estate taxes. To be valid, an ILIT must comply with the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and the case law established by Utah courts. The settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT, a “clear understanding” of the trust’s purpose and its benefits, and a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to protect assets and provide for the beneficiaries of an estate.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts Consultation

When you need business help with Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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