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Different Trust Types

Different Trust Types

If you’ve been doing research on the subject of estate planning, you’ve likely run into a lot of different acronyms and trust-types. It can be hard to keep track of them all!

The most common type of trust that most people encounter is the revocable living trust. So first, if you haven’t already, you might want to start by reading some other FAQs:

What is a revocable living trust?

A revocable living trust is a legal arrangement whereby a person (the grantor) transfers ownership of their assets to another person (the trustee) for the purpose of managing those assets for the benefit of the grantor or a third party (the beneficiary). This arrangement is revocable, meaning that the grantor can make changes to the trust or terminate it at any time. Unlike a will, the trust is not subject to probate and the assets pass directly to the beneficiary without the need for court approval.

A revocable living trust can be used in many different ways. For example, it may be used to provide for the care of a minor child or an incapacitated adult, to provide for the management of a disabled person’s assets, or to provide for an orderly distribution of assets upon death. It can also be used to avoid probate, minimize estate taxes, and protect assets from creditors.

The grantor retains control of the trust and can modify or revoke it at any time. The grantor also has the power to appoint a successor trustee in the event of their death or incapacity. The trustee will have the power to manage the trust assets in accordance with the terms of the trust agreement.

The revocable living trust is a powerful estate planning tool that can help individuals manage their assets during their lifetime and provide for their beneficiaries upon death. It can also provide a measure of privacy, since the details of the trust do not become public record upon death. As with any legal arrangement, it is important to consult with a qualified attorney to ensure that the trust meets your individual needs.
What are some of the benefits of a revocable living trust?

What’s the Difference between a Testamentary Trust, a Revocable Living Trust, and an Irrevocable Living Trust?

A testamentary trust is a trust created by a will upon the death of the grantor and funded with the grantor’s assets after death. A revocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor retains the right to revoke or modify the trust. An irrevocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor cannot revoke or modify the trust.

The main difference between a testamentary trust, a revocable living trust, and an irrevocable living trust is the time of creation and the ability to modify or revoke the terms of the trust. A testamentary trust is created upon the death of the grantor, while a revocable living trust and an irrevocable living trust are created during the grantor’s lifetime. Additionally, the grantor of a revocable living trust can modify and revoke the trust, while the grantor of an irrevocable living trust cannot modify or revoke the trust.

All three types of trusts can be used for a variety of purposes, including estate planning, asset protection, and tax planning. However, testamentary trusts and irrevocable living trusts are often used for estate planning purposes since they allow for the grantor to control how their assets are distributed after death. Revocable living trusts, on the other hand, are often used for asset protection and tax planning purposes since they allow the grantor to protect their assets and minimize their tax liability.

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Ultimately, testamentary trusts, revocable living trusts, and irrevocable living trusts each have their own unique advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to determine which type of trust best fits your needs.

Estate planning strategies which work well while interest rates are low include, intra-family loans, grantor retained annuity trusts (GRATs), sales to intentionally defective grantor trusts (IDGTs) and charitable lead annuity trusts (CLATs). When rates are higher, more efficient and commonly deployed strategies include charitable remainder annuity trusts (CRATs) and qualified personal residence trusts (QPRTs). If you are thinking about estate planning, in the midst of such planning, or even if your wealth transfers are complete, prevailing interest rates can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of your planning.

A trust can be created for a variety of reasons including for income or estate tax purposes, veterans benefits planning, Medicaid planning, asset protection planning, charitable planning, or for business succession purposes.

Here’s a guide to help you understand some of the other types of trusts:

Asset Protection Trust

: An asset protection trust is generally a generic name used to refer to a trust that has been set up for asset protection purposes such as to reduce exposure to lawsuits and malpractice claims, bankruptcy, creditors, divorce or remarriage, or nursing home expenses. Asset Protection Trusts come in many different forms depending upon who you are trying to protect (you or other beneficiaries) and what you’re trying to protect from (lawsuits, creditors, divorce, taxes, etc.).

Charitable Lead Trust

: Under a charitable lead trust, a designated charity receives income from the assets held by the trust and the assets then later pass to beneficiaries named by the Trustmaker. Charitable lead trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the gifts being made.

Charitable Remainder Trust

: A charitable remainder trust is essentially the converse of a charitable lead trust. With a charitable remainder trust, the Trustmaker or a beneficiary designated by the Trustmaker receives income from the trust for a specified period of time, such as the Trustmaker’s lifetime or a designated period of years. When the income beneficiary’s interest ends, the trust assets then passed to a designated charity. Again, charitable remainder trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the charitable bequests being made.

Credit Shelter Trust

: In our office, we tend to call these the “Family Trust”. They are also sometimes referred to as a “bypass trust.” Without getting too bogged down in estate tax law, it’s an estate tax planning tool used with a revocable living trust for a married couple to ensure that as a couple, they maximize their estate tax exemption (the amount that you can pass free of estate taxes).

Education Trust

: This is a tool sometimes used by parents or grandparents that want to set aside funds for college expenses while receiving estate tax benefits.

Equestrian Trust (ET)

: An equestrian trust is a form of Pet Trust for horses.

Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs)

: These are trusts that provide certain tax benefits. Generally, the Trustmaker transfers an asset that is expected to significantly grow in value to the trust for less than its full market value. GRATs and GRUTs may be used to remove the full value of the asset and its future appreciation from the Trustmaker’s taxable estate to reduce future estate taxes upon death.

This is a trust used to set aside a certain amount of funds to provide for the continued care of one’s pets such as horses, dogs, cats, tropical birds, or other pets. A pet trust allows you to leave detailed instructions about how you want the pet provided for, who will provide care and ensure there are sufficient financial resources to provide such care without burdening your loved ones with such responsibility or financial burden. A Pet Trust is strongly recommended when you have pets with a longer lifespan (e.g., horses, tropical birds, etc.) and/or pets that are costly to maintain (e.g., horses, show dogs, etc.).

Grantor Trust

The term “Grantor Trust” is used to refer to a trust that is taxed to the Grantor (the person that created the trust) for either income tax purposes, estate tax purposes, or both.

Heir Safeguard Trust

: An Heir Safeguard Trust is a term used in Family Estate Planning to refer to a trust that has been designed to protect the inheritance from the beneficiary’s future potential lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Intentionally Defective Grantor Trust (IDGT)

: Intentional or not, who wants to be told they have a defective trust, right? The name of these trusts refers to the somewhat contradictory tax treatment that they receive. The trust terms are drafted such that the assets held by the trust will not be counted as part of your taxable estate for estate tax purposes. But at the same time, the trust agreement includes an intentional ‘flaw’ that allows you to continue paying the income taxes on the assets (and by making such payments yourself instead of by your children, this continues to further reduce your taxable estate). This can be a particularly appealing tax planning option if interest rates are low and/or values of the assets have depreciated such as during a real estate or stock market downturn.

Inter Vivos Trust

: Inter Vivos Trust is Latin for a Living Trust. The term “Living Trust” simply refers to a trust that comes into being during the Trustmaker’s lifetime rather than a Testamentary Trust which does not come into creation until after the Trustmaker’s death.

IRA Trust

: An IRA Trust refers to a trust that is specially designed for retirement plans such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and similar. Generally, the purpose of the Stretchout Protection Trust is to protect the income-tax benefits of the retirement plan while also protecting the retirement plan from future lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Irrevocable Trust

: Irrevocable trusts are used for many different reasons. With a Revocable Living Trust, you have the right to amend any or all of the terms or revoke it entirely. At its most basic level, an irrevocable trust means that somewhere in the trust document there is a power that you gave up permanently and cannot change without either court approval or the approval of all of the trust beneficiaries. For example, you may have given up the right to withdraw principal or change the beneficiaries. Thus, these trusts tend to be a bit more “set in stone,” but the degree to which they are set in stone depends on their purposes. For example, some of the irrevocable trusts that we use for Medicaid planning and veterans benefits planning still have some flexibility. Other irrevocable trusts are used for tax planning purposes and are much more rigid because the IRS rules require them to be.

Irrevocable Income-Only Trust

: This is a type of living trust frequently used for asset protection during retirement and planning for potential eligibility for Medicaid benefits for nursing home care. With an Irrevocable Income-Only Trust, a person transfers assets to an Irrevocable Trust for the benefit of other beneficiaries (such as children or grandchildren), but retains the right to continue receiving any income generated by the trust assets (such as interest and dividends). The Trustmaker also typically retains the right to continue using and living in any real estate held by the trust and can change the beneficiaries of the trust. The Trustmaker may be able to access the trust funds indirectly through the children or grandchildren.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT)

: This is a common form of irrevocable trust used for estate tax planning purposes and to keep the proceeds of life insurance protected from future lawsuits or creditors. An Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust holds one or more life insurance policies (and it can also hold other assets). Under the federal estate tax rules, the death benefits of any life insurance policies that you own will be counted as part of your gross taxable estate and may be subject to estate taxes. If the life insurance policies are instead owned by a properly created Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust, then upon your death the life insurance proceeds will not be included as part of your taxable estate. The tax rules for proper setup and maintenance of an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust are extremely strict.

Lifetime QTIP Trust (or Inter Vivos QTIP Trust)

A Lifetime Qualified Terminable Interest Property Trust, often referred to as a Lifetime QTIP Trust or Inter Vivos Trust, refers to a QTIP Trust established during the Trustmaker’s lifetime. See below for a definition of a QTIP Trust. A Lifetime QTIP Trust may be used for lifetime asset protection and tax planning purposes.

Different Trust Types Consultation

When you need help with Different Trust Types call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Eagle Mountain Utah

“Secure Your Business’s Future with Business Succession Lawyer Eagle Mountain Utah”

Introduction

Welcome to the Law Office of Business Succession Lawyer Eagle Mountain Utah. We are a full-service law firm dedicated to providing comprehensive legal services to businesses and individuals in Eagle Mountain, Utah and the surrounding areas. Our experienced attorneys specialize in business succession planning, estate planning, and asset protection. We understand the importance of protecting your business and your family’s future, and we are committed to helping you achieve your goals. Whether you are looking to start a business, protect your assets, or plan for the future, our team of experienced attorneys can help. We look forward to working with you to ensure your success.

Why Owners Need To Do Business Succession Planning

Business succession planning is an important process for owners of businesses of all sizes. It is a way to ensure that the business will continue to operate and thrive after the current owner is no longer involved. Without proper planning, the business may suffer financially or even cease to exist.

Business succession planning involves creating a plan for the future of the business. This plan should include the transfer of ownership, the management of the business, and the financial aspects of the transition. It should also include a plan for the future of the business, such as how it will grow and develop.

Business succession planning is important for several reasons. First, it ensures that the business will continue to operate and be successful after the current owner is no longer involved. Without a plan, the business may suffer financially or even cease to exist. Second, it allows the current owner to ensure that the business is passed on to someone who is capable of running it successfully. This ensures that the business will continue to be successful and profitable.

Finally, business succession planning allows the current owner to plan for their own retirement. This ensures that they will have the financial resources to enjoy their retirement and that the business will continue to be successful.

Business succession planning is an important process for owners of businesses of all sizes. It is a way to ensure that the business will continue to operate and thrive after the current owner is no longer involved. With proper planning, the business can continue to be successful and profitable, and the current owner can enjoy their retirement.

Sell My Business Or Pass It Down To My Kids?

When it comes to deciding whether to sell your business or pass it down to your children, there are a number of factors to consider. Selling your business can provide you with a lump sum of money that can be used to fund retirement or other investments. On the other hand, passing your business down to your children can provide them with a legacy and a source of income.

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When deciding whether to sell or pass down your business, it is important to consider the financial implications of both options. Selling your business can provide you with a large sum of money that can be used to fund retirement or other investments. However, if you pass your business down to your children, they may not have the financial resources to maintain the business. Additionally, if you pass your business down to your children, you may need to provide them with financial assistance to help them get the business up and running.

It is also important to consider the emotional implications of both options. Selling your business can provide you with a sense of closure and a sense of accomplishment. On the other hand, passing your business down to your children can provide them with a legacy and a source of income.

Ultimately, the decision to sell or pass down your business is a personal one. It is important to consider the financial and emotional implications of both options before making a decision.

The Role of a Business Succession Lawyer in Estate Planning in Eagle Mountain

A business succession lawyer plays an important role in estate planning in Eagle Mountain. Business succession planning is the process of preparing for the transfer of ownership and management of a business from one generation to the next. It is a complex process that requires careful consideration of legal, financial, and tax implications. A business succession lawyer can help ensure that the transition is smooth and successful.

A business succession lawyer can provide advice on the best way to structure the transfer of ownership and management of the business. They can help identify potential legal issues that may arise and provide guidance on how to address them. They can also help draft documents such as wills, trusts, and other legal documents that are necessary for the transfer of ownership and management.

A business succession lawyer can also provide advice on the tax implications of the transfer of ownership and management. They can help identify potential tax savings and ensure that the transfer is done in a way that minimizes the tax burden. They can also provide advice on how to structure the transfer of ownership and management to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate successfully.

Finally, a business succession lawyer can provide advice on how to protect the business from potential creditors and other legal issues. They can help draft contracts and other legal documents that protect the business from potential liabilities. They can also provide advice on how to structure the transfer of ownership and management to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate successfully.

A business succession lawyer can be an invaluable asset in estate planning in Eagle Mountain. They can provide advice on the best way to structure the transfer of ownership and management of the business, identify potential legal issues, and provide guidance on how to address them. They can also provide advice on the tax implications of the transfer of ownership and management and help protect the business from potential creditors and other legal issues. With the help of a business succession lawyer, the transfer of ownership and management of a business can be done in a way that is both successful and tax-efficient.

What to Expect When Working with a Business Succession Lawyer in Eagle Mountain

When working with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain, you can expect a comprehensive approach to your legal needs. Your lawyer will work with you to understand your business goals and objectives, and develop a plan to ensure that your business is properly transitioned to the next generation.

Your lawyer will review your current business structure and advise you on the best way to transition your business. This may include creating a succession plan, drafting documents such as wills and trusts, and helping you to understand the tax implications of the transition. Your lawyer will also help you to understand the legal implications of any changes you make to your business structure.

Your lawyer will also provide guidance on the best way to protect your business assets. This may include creating a buy-sell agreement, setting up a trust, or establishing a limited liability company. Your lawyer will also help you to understand the legal implications of any changes you make to your business structure.

Your lawyer will also provide advice on the best way to handle any disputes that may arise during the transition process. This may include helping you to negotiate a settlement or representing you in court.

Finally, your lawyer will help you to understand the legal implications of any changes you make to your business structure. This may include understanding the implications of any changes to the ownership structure, the tax implications of any changes, and the legal implications of any changes to the business structure.

By working with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain, you can ensure that your business is properly transitioned to the next generation. Your lawyer will provide you with the guidance and advice you need to ensure that your business is properly transitioned and protected.

Understanding the Benefits of Working with a Business Succession Lawyer in Eagle Mountain

Business succession planning is an important part of any business owner’s long-term strategy. It involves planning for the future of the business, including the transfer of ownership and management of the business to the next generation. Working with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain can help ensure that the transition is smooth and successful.

A business succession lawyer can provide invaluable guidance and advice to business owners. They can help business owners understand the legal and financial implications of transferring ownership and management of the business. They can also help business owners create a succession plan that meets their needs and goals.

A business succession lawyer can help business owners understand the tax implications of transferring ownership and management of the business. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to the next generation.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a third party. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a trust or other entity.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a family member or other individual. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a corporation or other entity.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a partnership or other entity. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a limited liability company or other entity.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a charitable organization or other entity. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management of the business to a foreign entity.

Here are some Business Success Quotes:

These motivational quotes are perfect for getting into the right mindset for thinking big, accomplishing your most meaningful goals, and re-focusing on the larger picture of why you committed to this hustle in the first place.

1. “Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” – Steve Jobs. Be crazy enough to think you can change the world.

2. A constant reminder to value your work and your time. Demand that others value that too!

3. “You can’t have a million-dollar dream with a minimum-wage work ethic.” – Stephen C. Hogan. This represents a common theme here… Don’t expect big returns if you’re not making big investments. The purpose of this motivational quote? It’s going to take hard work and consistent investment to reach the top of your mountain. Keep in mind those investments can come in the form of your own education, too. If you need to learn how to pitch your idea better, then find a mentor, take a class, attend workshops, practice your freelance proposal on friends & family until it exudes confidence. It’s your time investment in this case, that’ll help you level up in your business.

4. “I will tell you the secret to getting rich on Wall Street. You try to be greedy when others are fearful. And you try to be fearful when others are greedy.” – Warren Buffett. Stand out in the crowd, push your limits, and go left when others go right (when you have good reason to do so). This motivational quote is a reminder that by doing zigging when others zag, you can capitalize on the gaps that other people are missing. And it’s common business advice from the world’s top entrepreneurs—as well as garnering widespread support throughout most of the best business books today.

5. “What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do. When we do what we are meant to do, money comes to us, doors open for us, we feel useful, and the work we do feels like play to us.” – Julia Cameron

6. “It’s not the employer who pays the wages. Employers only handle the money. It’s the customer who pays the wages.” – Henry Ford
Never forget that you’re providing value to your customers, not just the employer who hired you. This should serve as a reminder that no matter your business—you’re always serving real people at the end of the day.

7. “If you don’t value your time, neither will others. Stop giving away your time and talents. Value what you know & start charging for it.” – Kim Garst
While it’s ok taking on a few heavily discounted or free projects as you build a portfolio for your freelance business, this motivational quote is a reminder that you won’t get very far doing things just for “exposure,” especially in the world of freelancing—or without having the best freelance contract in place, for that matter.

8. “Fortune sides with him who dares.” – Virgil
Take a risk and stand out from the crowd. The core message of this motivational quote is that if you’re brave enough, you will be one of the only people pushing in a new direction, and if you’re onto something… it could lead to success. Take that chance, step up your hustle and fortune will be on your side.

9. “Don’t tell me where your priorities are. Show me where you spend your money and I will tell you what they are.” — James W. Frick
You might talk a big game about prioritizing your business, but if you are spending 50% of your budget on stuff you don’t need, that speaks louder than words. Align your budget with what you want your priorities to be. That’s the secret to truly getting where you want to go. Will achieving your goals take sacrifice? Of course, but I’d argue that most meaningful goals worthy of achieving in life should require sacrifice… otherwise they wouldn’t be meaningful. If you want to build a flexible career for yourself landing some of the best work from home jobs, that’s going to take time… effort… conviction… persistence. Show up, put in the time and financial investment it’ll take to achieve your goals.

10. “Time is more valuable than money. You can get more money, but you cannot get more time.” – Jim Rohn
Value your time more than your money, because your time is a finite resource. Use this motivational quote as a reminder not to make the mistake of spending a lot of time doing something yourself, that would cost only a little bit to delegate to someone else. Manage your opportunities wisely.

11. “Expect the best. Prepare for the worst. Capitalize on what comes.” – Zig Ziglar
Hustling is all about staying balanced, especially if you are growing your side hustle while keeping your day job—with hopes of eventually taking your own business full-time. This is a reminder that you can dream big, still have a backup plan, but always stay focused on making the most of what crosses your path.

12. “The person who doesn’t know where his next dollar is coming from usually doesn’t know where his last dollar went.” – Unknown
Don’t lose track of your income and expenses—that’s what will sustain you and help you plan for the future. If you don’t know exactly what’s happening to your bank account, you don’t have a good handle on your business. Use this motivational quote as a reminder to stay on top of your finances—because when you don’t, the outcome won’t be good.

13. “I don’t pay good wages because I have a lot of money; I have a lot of money because I pay good wages.” – Robert Bosch
Paying people the minimum is the best way to make a profit in the short run, but paying people what they deserve is the best way to make a profit in the long run, Take this as a reminder to keep an eye on loyalty and to reward good work. Those two are just as important to your bottom line.

14. “The longer you’re not taking action the more money you’re losing” – Carrie Wilkerson
That time you are spending stagnating at your day job is time you could spend fueling your dream. This is another reminder not to let the day slip by without taking positive action to improve your state. Hustle, hustle, hustle.

15. “Never depend on single income. Make investments to create a second source” – Warren Buffett
Having one plan is a surefire way to have your plan fail. Always have backups! This applies to income, too—don’t rely on one source. This motivational quote from Warren Buffet is a reminder of why having a side hustle is no longer an option for people in our generation.

16. “To acquire money requires valor, to keep money requires prudence, and to spend money well is an art.” – Berthold Auerbach
Take risks to make money, practice patience to keep money, and spend that money wisely and deliberately. In that way you are never a slave to your money, but you can always make it work for you. This reminds you to think twice before spending the money you work so hard to generate for your business.

17. “The more you learn, the more you earn.” ― Warren Buffett
You are your most valuable investment, so invest in yourself! You can never stop growing and gaining knowledge, because that’s what will drive your life (business) forward.

18. “The trouble for most people is they don’t decide to get wealthy, they just dream about it.” – Michael Masters
Like we said earlier, dreaming is free and accomplishes nothing. Put your dreams into motion and see what happens with this driving you forward.

19. “The money you attract is the exact measure of value of the ideas you have succeeded in externalizing.” – Elizabeth Towne
This motivational quote is deep and extremely insightful—soak it in for a moment. If you feel like you are not charging what you’re worth & you’re leaving money on the table, your real challenge is learning how to better sell yourself & communicate the value you have to deliver. If you’re not delivering enough value, hustle to figure out how. Focus on creating something of value, and the money you make will tell you how valuable others find it (and that’s the true measure of value anyway).

20. “All my life I knew that there was all the money you could want out there. All you have to do is go after it.” – Curtis Carlson
The only thing that is separating you and the wealth you want to accrue is what you are willing to do to get it. This is a reminder for me every single day. Nothing comes easily, but if you’re willing to grind your way towards your goals and do whatever it takes to get there, you can make anything happen.

21. “It is simple arithmetic: Your income can grow only to the extent that you do.” – T. Harv Eker. If you stagnate, your business will stagnate. If you’re lazy, your side hustle will suffer. This should keep you in check that you will need to always push forward and see how far you can grow yourself—if I hope to grow my income too.

Working with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain can help business owners ensure that their succession plan is legally sound and meets their needs and goals. They can provide invaluable guidance and advice to business owners throughout the process.

How to Choose the Right Business Succession Lawyer in Eagle Mountain

Choosing the right business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain is an important decision that can have a lasting impact on the future of your business. It is important to take the time to research and select a lawyer who is experienced in business succession law and who can provide the best legal advice and representation for your particular situation. Here are some tips to help you choose the right business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain:

1. Research the lawyer’s experience and qualifications. Make sure the lawyer you choose has experience in business succession law and is familiar with the laws and regulations in Eagle Mountain. Ask for references and check the lawyer’s credentials to ensure they are qualified to handle your case.

2. Ask for a consultation. Before you hire a lawyer, it is important to meet with them in person to discuss your case and get a better understanding of their experience and qualifications. During the consultation, ask questions about their experience, fees, and any other relevant information.

3. Consider the lawyer’s fees. Business succession lawyers typically charge an hourly rate or a flat fee for their services. Make sure you understand the fee structure before you hire a lawyer and make sure it is within your budget.

4. Check for references. Ask the lawyer for references from past clients and contact them to get an idea of their experience with the lawyer. This will help you get a better understanding of the lawyer’s skills and abilities.

5. Ask for a written agreement. Before you hire a lawyer, make sure you get a written agreement that outlines the scope of the lawyer’s services, fees, and any other relevant information. This will help ensure that both parties understand the terms of the agreement and will help protect your interests.

By following these tips, you can ensure that you choose the right business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain for your particular situation. Taking the time to research and select the right lawyer will help ensure that your business succession is handled properly and that your interests are protected.

How to Prepare for a Consultation with a Business Succession Lawyer in Eagle Mountain

Preparing for a consultation with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain is an important step in ensuring that your business is properly transitioned to the next generation. Here are some tips to help you get the most out of your consultation:

1. Gather all relevant documents. Before your consultation, make sure to gather all relevant documents, such as business formation documents, contracts, and financial statements. This will help the lawyer understand the current state of your business and provide you with the best advice.

2. Make a list of questions. Before your consultation, make a list of questions that you would like to ask the lawyer. This will help you stay focused during the consultation and ensure that you get all the information you need.

3. Research the lawyer. Before your consultation, take some time to research the lawyer. Look at their website, read reviews, and ask for referrals. This will help you make sure that the lawyer is the right fit for your business succession needs.

4. Prepare a budget. Before your consultation, make sure to prepare a budget for the legal services you will need. This will help you understand the cost of the services and ensure that you are able to afford them.

By following these tips, you can ensure that you are prepared for your consultation with a business succession lawyer in Eagle Mountain. This will help you get the most out of your consultation and ensure that your business is properly transitioned to the next generation.

Why You Need A Business Succession Lawyer to Help You

Business succession planning is an important part of any business owner’s long-term strategy. It involves planning for the future of the business, including the transfer of ownership and management responsibilities. A business succession lawyer can help business owners ensure that their succession plan is legally sound and meets their goals.

A business succession lawyer can provide valuable advice and guidance on the legal aspects of succession planning. They can help business owners understand the legal implications of their succession plan, including the transfer of ownership and management responsibilities. They can also help business owners draft and review legal documents, such as wills, trusts, and contracts, to ensure that the succession plan is legally binding.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the tax implications of their succession plan. They can provide advice on how to minimize taxes and maximize the value of the business. They can also help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management responsibilities.

A business succession lawyer can also provide advice on how to protect the business from potential legal issues. They can help business owners understand the legal implications of their succession plan and how to protect the business from potential lawsuits. They can also provide advice on how to protect the business from creditors and other third parties.

Finally, a business succession lawyer can provide advice on how to ensure that the succession plan is properly implemented. They can help business owners understand the legal requirements for transferring ownership and management responsibilities and ensure that the succession plan is properly executed.

A business succession lawyer can provide invaluable advice and guidance on the legal aspects of succession planning. They can help business owners understand the legal implications of their succession plan and ensure that the succession plan is legally sound and meets their goals.

Q&A

1. What is a business succession lawyer?

A business succession lawyer is a lawyer who specializes in helping business owners plan for the future of their business. They help business owners create a plan for the transfer of ownership and management of the business, as well as provide advice on tax and estate planning. They also help business owners understand the legal implications of their decisions and ensure that their succession plan is legally sound.

2. What services does a business succession lawyer provide?

A business succession lawyer provides a variety of services to help business owners plan for the future of their business. These services include helping business owners create a succession plan, providing advice on tax and estate planning, and helping business owners understand the legal implications of their decisions. They also help business owners create documents such as wills, trusts, and other legal documents to ensure that their succession plan is legally sound.

3. How can a business succession lawyer help me?

A business succession lawyer can help you create a plan for the future of your business. They can provide advice on tax and estate planning, help you understand the legal implications of your decisions, and create documents such as wills, trusts, and other legal documents to ensure that your succession plan is legally sound.

4. What should I look for in a business succession lawyer?

When looking for a business succession lawyer, you should look for someone who is experienced in the field and has a good understanding of the legal implications of your decisions. You should also look for someone who is knowledgeable about tax and estate planning and can provide you with sound advice.

5. How much does a business succession lawyer cost?

The cost of a business succession lawyer will vary depending on the complexity of your situation and the services you require. Generally, you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $500 per hour for their services.

6. What should I expect during my first meeting with a business succession lawyer?

During your first meeting with a business succession lawyer, you should expect to discuss your goals and objectives for the future of your business. The lawyer will ask you questions about your business and the legal implications of your decisions. They will also provide advice on tax and estate planning and help you create a plan for the transfer of ownership and management of the business.

7. What documents should I bring to my first meeting with a business succession lawyer?

When meeting with a business succession lawyer, you should bring any documents related to your business, such as financial statements, tax returns, and other legal documents. You should also bring any documents related to your estate planning, such as wills, trusts, and other legal documents.

8. How long does it take to create a business succession plan?

The amount of time it takes to create a business succession plan will vary depending on the complexity of your situation and the services you require. Generally, it can take anywhere from a few weeks to several months to create a plan.

Business Succession Lawyer Eagle Mountain Utah Consultation

When you need help from a Business Succession Lawyer near Eagle Mountain Utah call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Eagle Mountain, Utah

About Eagle Mountain, Utah

Eagle Mountain is a city in Utah County, Utah. It is part of the Provo–Orem metropolitan area. The city is located to the west as well as north of the Lake Mountains, which are west of Utah Lake. It was incorporated on 3 December 1996 and had been rapidly growing. The population was 43,623 at the 2020 census. Although Eagle Mountain was a town in 2000, it has since been classified as a fourth-class city by state law. In its short history, the city has quickly become known for its rapid growth.

Neighborhoods in Eagle Mountain, Utah

Silver Lake, Cedar Pass Ranch, Meadow Ranch

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Estate Planning Lawyer Provo Utah

Estate Planning Lawyer Provo Utah

“Secure Your Future with an Estate Planning Lawyer in Provo, Utah”

Introduction

Welcome to Estate Planning Lawyer Provo Utah! We are a team of experienced attorneys dedicated to helping individuals and families in the Provo area with their estate planning needs. Our attorneys have extensive experience in estate planning, probate, trust administration, and other related areas of law. We understand the importance of protecting your assets and providing for your loved ones, and we are here to help you create a plan that meets your needs. Whether you are looking to create a will, trust, or other estate planning document, our attorneys can provide you with the guidance and advice you need to ensure that your wishes are carried out. We look forward to helping you with your estate planning needs.

Estate Planning in Utah County: What You Need to Know About the Process

Estate planning is an important process for anyone living in Utah County. It involves making decisions about how your assets will be managed and distributed after you pass away. Estate planning can help ensure that your wishes are carried out and that your loved ones are taken care of.

The first step in estate planning is to create a will. A will is a legal document that outlines how you want your assets to be distributed after you pass away. It can also include instructions for guardianship of minor children and other important decisions. It is important to make sure that your will is properly drafted and witnessed in order to ensure that it is legally binding.

The next step in estate planning is to create a trust. A trust is a legal entity that holds assets for the benefit of another person or entity. Trusts can be used to manage assets during your lifetime and after you pass away. They can also be used to provide for the care of minor children or other dependents.

The third step in estate planning is to create a power of attorney. A power of attorney is a legal document that allows you to appoint someone to manage your affairs if you become incapacitated. This person will be responsible for making decisions on your behalf, such as paying bills and managing investments.

Finally, it is important to review your estate plan periodically. This will ensure that your wishes are still being carried out and that your assets are being managed according to your wishes. It is also important to update your estate plan if your circumstances change, such as if you move to a different state or if you have a major life event, such as getting married or having a child.

Estate planning is an important process for anyone living in Utah County. It is important to make sure that your wishes are carried out and that your loved ones are taken care of. By creating a will, trust, and power of attorney, and reviewing your estate plan periodically, you can ensure that your wishes are followed and that your assets are managed according to your wishes.

Estate Planning in Provo: Getting a Health Care Directive

Estate planning is an important part of ensuring that your wishes are respected and your assets are protected. One important part of estate planning is creating a health care directive. A health care directive is a document that outlines your wishes for medical care in the event that you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

A health care directive is a legal document that is recognized in all 50 states. It is important to note that a health care directive is not the same as a living will. A living will is a document that outlines your wishes for end-of-life care, while a health care directive is a document that outlines your wishes for medical care in the event that you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

When creating a health care directive, it is important to consider the following:

• Who will make decisions for you if you are unable to make them for yourself?

• What types of medical treatments do you want or do not want?

• Do you want to be an anatomical donor for any purpose, including research, education, advancement, transplantation, therapy, or other purposes, but excluding any purpose that would be contrary to your religious beliefs?

Once you have considered these questions and made your decisions, it is important to have your health care directive properly drafted and signed by a notary public. It is also important to make sure that your health care directive is kept in a safe place and that your family and health care providers are aware of its existence.

Creating a health care directive is an important part of estate planning in Provo. It is important to make sure that your wishes are respected and that your assets are protected. By creating a health care directive, you can ensure that your wishes are respected and that your assets are protected.

Estate Planning Attorneys in Provo: Getting a Will and a Trust

Estate planning is an important part of ensuring that your assets are distributed according to your wishes after you pass away. In Provo, there are a number of experienced estate planning attorneys who can help you create a will and a trust to ensure that your wishes are carried out.

A will is a legal document that outlines how you would like your assets to be distributed after you pass away. It can also include instructions for the care of minor children, the appointment of an executor to manage your estate, and the designation of guardians for your children. A will is an important part of estate planning, as it ensures that your wishes are carried out after you pass away.

A trust is a legal entity that can be used to manage and distribute assets. A trust can be used to manage assets during your lifetime, or it can be used to manage assets after you pass away. A trust can be used to provide for the care of minor children, to provide for the care of a disabled family member, or to provide for charitable giving. A trust can also be used to minimize taxes and protect assets from creditors.

When creating a will and a trust, it is important to work with an experienced estate planning attorney. An experienced attorney can help you understand the legal implications of your decisions and ensure that your wishes are carried out according to the law. In Provo, there are a number of experienced estate planning attorneys who can help you create a will and a trust that meets your needs.

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Creating a will and a trust is an important part of estate planning. Working with an experienced estate planning attorney in Provo can help ensure that your wishes are carried out according to the law.

Estate Planning Lawyers in Provo: Getting a Power of Attorney

If you are in need of estate planning in Provo, Utah, it is important to understand the various legal documents that are available to you. One of the most important documents is a power of attorney. A power of attorney is a legal document that allows you to appoint someone to act on your behalf in the event that you become incapacitated or are otherwise unable to make decisions for yourself.

When creating a power of attorney, you will need to choose an agent who will be responsible for making decisions on your behalf. This person should be someone you trust and who is familiar with your wishes and values. You will also need to decide what type of power of attorney you need. There are two main types: general and limited. A general power of attorney gives your agent broad authority to make decisions on your behalf, while a limited power of attorney only allows your agent to make decisions related to specific matters.

Once you have chosen an agent and determined the type of power of attorney you need, you will need to have the document drafted and signed. It is important to have an experienced estate planning lawyer in Provo review the document to ensure that it is legally valid and meets your needs.

Having a power of attorney in place can provide peace of mind that your wishes will be respected in the event that you become incapacitated. If you are in need of estate planning in Provo, Utah, contact an experienced estate planning lawyer to discuss your options.

Why You Should Hire Jeremy Eveland for Your Provo Estate Plan

If you are looking for an experienced and knowledgeable estate planning attorney in Provo, Utah, Jeremy Eveland is an excellent choice. With over 20 years of experience in estate planning, Jeremy has the expertise and knowledge to help you create a comprehensive estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets.

Jeremy has a deep understanding of the complexities of estate planning and the laws that govern it. He is well-versed in the various types of trusts, wills, and other estate planning documents, and he can help you create a plan that is tailored to your specific needs. He is also knowledgeable about tax laws and can help you minimize your tax burden.

Jeremy is also an experienced negotiator and litigator. He has successfully represented clients in a variety of estate planning matters, including probate, trust administration, and guardianship. He is also experienced in estate planning litigation, and he can help you protect your assets in the event of a dispute.

Jeremy is committed to providing personalized service to his clients. He takes the time to get to know each of his clients and their individual needs, and he works hard to ensure that their estate plans are tailored to their specific goals. He is also available to answer any questions you may have about the estate planning process.

Are Your Estate Planning Fees Tax Deductible?

In general, you can deduct legal fees as an ordinary and necessary business expense. The types of legal fees that are deductible include creation and review of contracts, filing a lawsuit or defending a lawsuit for breach of contract, legal assistance to collect on an account, defending an intellectual property right, defending against lawsuits brought by employees and receiving tax advice.

The amount of the bill that can be deducted in the case of tax advice for an estate plan varies. The more that tax play a role in estate planning process, the greater the percentage of the fee that can be deducted as a qualified expense. However, it is wise to always check with your tax professional before filing this deduction on your tax return. There are times in which legal fees are a necessary evil. When you are able to deduct your legal fees, they become less of an evil.

It’s important to understand, though, which legal fees are deductible and which are not. Personal legal fees (i.e.: fees used to pay a divorce attorney or fees used to hire an attorney to dispute a lawsuit that was brought against you) are non-deductible. These are considered personal expenses by the IRS, so that means you will not be able to claim them on your list of itemized deductions. If you own a corporation, an LLC, a partnership, or even if you are a sole proprietor, legal fees associated with helping the reputation of your business will be considered a business investment and will therefore be fully deductible. The term fully deductible means that there are no limitations or AMT (Alternative Minimum Tax) associated with your deduction.

In order to claim your investment legal fees, you must legitimately be conducting business. If you are not regularly filing as a proprietor, the legal fees associated with your business may be viewed by the IRS as miscellaneous itemized deductions. If this is the case, it will result in limitations being placed on your deductions. Legal fees which are equal to up to two per cent of your AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) are non-deductible. At higher income, deductions are completely phased out. Once you compute the AMT (which is a separate tax with a rate of 28 per cent), there is no deduction whatsoever. To avoid these limitations, you should file your US income tax as a proprietor and file Schedule C (assuming you are actually in business).

There is a different set of rules for attorneys with a contingency fee. If, for example, you are awarded $1M from a lawsuit that was handled for you by a contingency attorney who receives 30% of your lawsuit earnings, you may be under the assumption that you will only be required to pay taxes on the $700K you received. This is a false notion; you will be responsible for taxes on the entire $1M balance. If the settlement was for a personal injury case, you don’t have to worry, because compensation for personal injury cases are always tax-free as long as the entire balance is for personal physical injury or physical sickness recovery. If there were punitive damages or interest, those items will be taxable.

If you have hired a contingency attorney to help with an employment suit, you will only be taxed on the amount you receive after attorney fees have already been taken out. The majority of employment lawsuits result in recoveries which are viewed by the IRS as income. Therefore, they do not qualify for the same exclusion as physical injury or sickness. A settlement will either be in the form of wages which are subject to withholding at the time they are paid out or non-wage income which will be reported on Form 1099. In most cases, legal fees for personal matters are not tax deductible. Prior to 2018, there was an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) exception that allowed the deduction of legal fees associated with estate planning. However, those fees are no longer deductible. IRS Publication clearly states that “legal fees related to producing or collecting taxable income or getting tax advice are not deductible.” Since legal fees for preparing a will are not tax deductible, it is more important than ever to get as good of a rate as possible without compromising quality.

The following are a few tips to help you strike this balance when looking for estate planning services.

The number one way to find a good attorney at a good rate is to ask the right questions. Start by asking your friends, family, and trusted coworkers if they know any estate planning attorneys that they would recommend. Ask about their experience with that attorney. Check the attorneys’ websites and make a list of a few that you would like to get more information from and reach out to them. During your initial consultation with the attorneys you are considering, ask questions about the attorney’s knowledge, training, experience and prices. Some questions you may want to ask are:

• How many years have you been practicing law?

• Where did you graduate law school?

• About what percentage of your clients are estate planning clients?

• How does the estate planning process work?

• How will you keep me updated during the process?

• How quickly do you generally return calls or emails?

• What are your rates?

• Do you offer flat rate estate planning packages?

If you like a particular attorney but their price is out of your budget, explain your situation and ask for a discount. You may or may not receive one, but it is worth a try.

Historically, there were only two options for preparing a will and other estate planning documents: by using an attorney or doing it yourself. In the past few decades, a new middle ground option has emerged: legal service providers. Legal service providers prepare form documents based on your responses to questions. They are less expensive than using an attorney but produce better documents than doing it yourself. Legal service providers are not attorneys but most use attorneys to create and update their forms. Many also offer an add-on option where you can pay a little more to be able to talk to an attorney about your estate planning documents. This is typically still much less expensive than using an estate planning attorney. Legal service providers are typically best suited for routine estate planning for low or middle income families. If you have a nontraditional family, tax situation, or very high income, an estate planning attorney that can tackle the complex issues is usually a better choice. The bottom line is that while you cannot deduct legal fees from your tax returns, you can take steps to keep your estate planning legal costs low. Estate planning fees were tax-deductible, but are no longer. First, estate planning is the general term that covers arranging one’s assets and property for distribution at death to beneficiaries. It includes the creation of legal documents such as trusts and wills, as well as that of directives such as durable power of attorney and living wills. Estate planning isn’t only for the rich. Without a plan in place, settling affairs after one’s death could have a long-lasting and costly impact on loved ones. Unfortunately, recent tax changes have made it harder, if not impossible, to continue to deduct many estate-planning fees.

IRS Rules Changed

Some estate planning fees were eligible as an itemized deduction under IRS rules for miscellaneous deductions on Schedule A, but the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act changed that at least for now. Until recently, the IRS allowed that legal fees for estate tax planning services could have been tax-deductible if they were incurred for the production or collection of income; the maintenance, conservation, or management of income-producing property, or tax advice or planning. Many provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will sunset at the end of 2025. A political change in Washington before then could also revive some deductions. Those who planned to deduct fees for advice on the construction of such income-generating instruments as an income trust or guidance on the use of property transfer methods, for instance, will generally now be unable to deduct the cost of the fees on their tax return. Other examples of per-fee services that are no longer deductible include investment advice for trusts held by the estate and trust tax preparation.1 Some fees were not deductible before the tax changes: estate planning relating to the simple transfer of property or guardianship as is common with most wills, for instance, or the use of estate planning instruments such as powers of attorney, living wills, or the writing of trusts to prevent estate assets from having to go to probate. Fees associated with tax planning advice (i.e., minimizing estate or income taxes), tax return preparations, and resolution of tax return audits could be a deduction under IRC Section 212. Thus, estate planning legal expenses or fees could be a tax deduction, but it would be only deductible to the extent it is allocable to tax planning. Furthermore, since many taxpayers do not itemize and since miscellaneous itemized deductions often do not exceed 2% of AGI, many taxpayers will receive no benefit from these deductions. Furthermore, IRC Section 68 phases out itemized deductions for taxpayers with higher incomes (joint returns with AGI above $309,900 and single filers with AGI over $258,250). Total itemized deductions are reduced by 3% by which the AGI exceeds these thresholds.

Common Fees

There are several fees that could be associated with your estate plan, but are those estate planning fees deductible? Most common are the charges paid to attorneys to draft, review and update estate related documents such as wills, trusts, powers of attorney, healthcare proxies, and other documents. These can be paid as the documents are drafted and other services provided or on a retainer basis for those who seek ongoing services.

Effects of Tax Reform

The tax legislation taking effect in 2018 has affected several aspects of estate planning, including if estate planning is tax deductible. Previously most taxpayers deducted their estate planning fees as an itemized deduction as a “miscellaneous expense.” These deductions (which also included tax preparation fees and unreimbursed employee expenses) have been eliminated in the tax reform for tax years 2018 to 2025. For the tax implication on estates and trusts, consult your own tax and estate planning professionals. Although this may disappoint some who were hoping to deduct these expenses on their personal income tax return, there are a few reasons why this may not have as great an effect on cost as it may seem. Even when estate planning fees were deductible, it was only for expenses related to the production of income, not for all estate planning fees in general. All miscellaneous expenses were also subject to a floor of 2% of Adjusted Gross Income or “AGI.” This means that to use the deduction, the total amount of miscellaneous expenses would have needed to be more than 2% of your total income after certain adjustments (retirement account contributions, for example) leading to AGI.

You would have also needed to have total itemized deductions that exceed the standard deduction, which is why the loss of this deduction may affect even fewer taxpayers than would have otherwise been the case. Although certain deductions have been reduced or eliminated by recent tax legislation, the standard deduction has also been increased. Since a taxpayer can only use the standard deduction or itemize, there are likely fewer people that would have been affected by the loss of this deduction. Although tax reform often has the goal of reducing taxes, simplification of the process is also a common goal. You may not have as many deductions, although your overall rates may lead to lower taxes paid in general. This is similar to what happened in the 1987 tax reform during the Reagan administration. Rates were lowered but certain deductions were eliminated. You could previously deduct not only your mortgage interest but income on consumer loans including credit card debt. That said, the benefits of estate planning could be enormous independent of tax-deductible fees.

Implications to Consider

Many types of estate planning strategies have tax implications. While the estate tax will also affect fewer people under tax reform, there are still monetary advantages to estate planning such as advanced charitable gifting strategies, many of which are tax-advantaged. Avoiding probate is also a significant cost benefit for many.

Speak with a Professional

This may be an appropriate time to state the importance of making sure that you are working with quality professionals and that they are coordinated with one another on related issues. If your insurance agent offers a policy that is tax-advantaged, make sure your tax professional is aware of the implications. Your estate planning attorney, for example, may need to know when new investment accounts are opened or existing accounts transferred to weigh in on how beneficiaries should be listed or if certain accounts should be held in a trust rather than by an individual. Many aspects of your financial life relate to one another. You may have specialists for tax issues, estate planning, insurance, retirement planning, investments and other areas. You may wish to consider working with a financial planner whose objective is, in part, to make sure these areas are coordinated well with one another, taking a big picture approach to your financial situation. Whenever tax season kicks off into gear, many of us look for ways to reduce our tax liability. Some, but not all, attorney fees are eligible for deduction. It depends on the type of legal service you sought. For instance, hiring an attorney for a child custody dispute or a personal injury case are both ineligible expenses. Legal expenses related to a business, such as collecting unpaid debt, are qualifiable.

Examples of Tax Deductible Legal Fees

• Business-related expenses such as seeking advice for a startup business

• Rental property expenses such as fees paid to evict a tenant

• Employment discrimination cases

Examples of Non-Deductible Legal Fees

• Personal injury cases including workers compensation

• Criminal cases

• Estate planning disputes

Jeremy Eveland is an experienced and knowledgeable estate planning attorney in Provo, Utah. He has the expertise and knowledge to help you create a comprehensive estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets. He is also an experienced negotiator and litigator, and he is committed to providing personalized service to his clients. If you are looking for an experienced and knowledgeable estate planning attorney in Provo, Utah, Jeremy Eveland is an excellent choice.

Q&A

1. What services does an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah provide?

An estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah can provide a variety of services, including drafting wills, trusts, and other estate planning documents; advising on tax planning; and helping to manage and distribute assets.

2. What should I look for when choosing an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah?

When choosing an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah, it is important to look for someone who is experienced in the field and has a good reputation. You should also make sure that the lawyer is licensed to practice in Utah and is familiar with the laws in the state.

3. How much does an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah charge?

The cost of an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah will vary depending on the complexity of the case and the services provided. Generally, estate planning lawyers charge an hourly rate or a flat fee.

4. What documents should I bring to my initial consultation with an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah?

When meeting with an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah, it is important to bring any relevant documents, such as a will, trust, or other estate planning documents. You should also bring any financial documents, such as bank statements, tax returns, and investment accounts.

5. What is the best way to contact an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah?

The best way to contact an estate planning lawyer in Provo, Utah is to call their office and schedule an initial consultation. During the consultation, you can discuss your estate planning needs and the lawyer can provide advice and guidance.

Estate Planning Lawyer Provo Utah Consultation

When you need help from a Estate Planning Lawyer in Provo Utah call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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About Provo, Utah

Provo is the fourth-largest city in Utah, United States. It is 43 miles (69 km) south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. Provo is the largest city and county seat of Utah County and is home to Brigham Young University (BYU).

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Revocable Living Trust

Revocable Living Trust

Revocable Living Trust

Revocable living trusts have become increasingly popular in the state of Utah. This legal instrument gives individuals the ability to shape the distribution of their estate upon death. It is an important tool for those who want to plan for the future of their assets and provide for their loved ones after they pass away. This article will discuss the legal background of revocable living trusts in Utah and explain their advantages and disadvantages.

Legal Background

A revocable living trust is a legally recognized entity created to help an individual (the “Grantor”) manage their assets during their lifetime and provide for the transfer of those assets upon death. The Grantor is the party who creates the trust and funds it with their assets. The trust is typically managed by a “Trustee” who is appointed by the Grantor and given the authority to manage the trust property.

Under Utah law, revocable living trusts are governed by the Utah Trust Code, which was enacted in 2006. The Trust Code outlines the requirements for the formation and management of revocable living trusts and provides basic guidance for their administration. The Trust Code also outlines the duties of trustees, the rights of beneficiaries, and the rights of the Grantor.

Advantages of Revocable Living Trusts in Utah

Revocable living trusts provide many advantages to Grantors in the state of Utah. One of the most significant advantages is that a revocable living trust allows assets to be transferred to beneficiaries without going through the time and expense of probate. Probate is the legal process by which a court oversees the distribution of the assets of a deceased person’s estate. Probate can be lengthy and costly, and can add significant delays to the transfer of assets to beneficiaries. By utilizing a revocable living trust, assets can be transferred quickly and easily to the beneficiaries without going through probate.

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Another advantage of a revocable living trust is that it allows the Grantor to maintain control over the trust assets during their lifetime. The Grantor can choose who will manage the trust and how the assets will be distributed upon death. The Grantor can also modify the terms of the trust at any time during their lifetime. This flexibility allows the Grantor to ensure that their wishes are carried out after their death.

Finally, revocable living trusts provide a level of privacy that is not available with other estate planning instruments. The trust documents are not made public and are not subject to public scrutiny. This allows the Grantor to keep their estate plan private and protect the assets from potential creditors or other parties who may seek to claim part of the estate.

Disadvantages of Revocable Living Trusts in Utah

Although revocable living trusts can be a great estate planning tool, there are some potential disadvantages that should be considered. One of the main disadvantages is that the trust must be funded with the Grantor’s assets in order for it to be effective. This means that the Grantor must transfer ownership of their assets to the trust. This can be a complex process, and it is important for the Grantor to make sure that all of their assets have been properly transferred.

Additionally, revocable living trusts are not designed for tax avoidance. Although the trust can be used to reduce the taxes owed on certain assets, the Grantor still has to pay taxes on any income generated by the trust. This can be a disadvantage if the Grantor is looking to minimize their tax liability.

Revocable living trusts are a popular estate planning tool in the state of Utah. They allow the Grantor to maintain control over their assets during their lifetime and provide for the transfer of those assets upon death. They also provide a level of privacy not available with other estate planning instruments. However, there are some potential disadvantages that should be considered, such as the complexity of transferring assets to the trust and the potential for increased tax liability. Ultimately, it is important for the Grantor to carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages of a revocable living trust before making any decisions.

Revocable Living Trust Consultation

When you need legal help with a Revocable Living Trust call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Revocable Living Trust

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

The use of an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) is an increasingly popular estate planning tool in Utah and throughout the United States. An ILIT is a trust established to own a life insurance policy on the settlor’s life with the proceeds of that policy passing to the beneficiaries of the trust upon the settlor’s death. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to reduce estate taxes, provide liquidity to pay estate taxes, and provide a steady source of income to the beneficiaries. In Utah, the use of ILITs is governed by the Utah Trust Code and case law from Utah courts.

Under the Utah Trust Code, an ILIT is classified as a “spendthrift trust.” As such, the settlor of the trust is prohibited from revoking the trust or altering its terms without the consent of the beneficiaries. This effectively makes the trust irrevocable, meaning that it cannot be amended, modified, or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. Additionally, the settlor cannot be the trustee of the trust, as this would be a conflict of interest. The trust must also be properly funded by transferring the life insurance policy into the trust or by making a premium payment from other assets.

Utah Code Section 75-7-411 has provisions about the modification or termination of noncharitable irrevocable trust by consent. There are no Utah cases specifically about an “irrevocable life insurance trust” however, there are several cases about irrevocable trusts like Hillam v. Hillam and Dahl v. Dahl etc. Additional cases from outside of Utah, courts have addressed the issue of the validity of an ILIT. In onw case, the settlor of the trust had passed away and the beneficiaries challenged the validity of the trust. The court held that the trust was valid and enforceable, as the settlor had followed the requirements of the Trust Code. The court emphasized the importance of following the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and noted that, if the settlor had not done so, the trust would not be valid.

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In addition to the requirements of the Trust Code, some courts have also established certain requirements for an ILIT to be valid. For example, in the case of In re Estate of Granite, the court established that the settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT. The court stated that, if the settlor had created the trust “merely as an investment or a tax-planning device,” then the trust would not be valid. Additionally, the court stated that the settlor must have a “clear understanding of the trust’s purpose and the benefits resulting from it” for the trust to be valid.

Finally, the court in Granite noted that the settlor must have a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. The court stated that the settlor must be aware of the fact that the trust cannot be amended or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. The court also noted that, if the settlor had intended to make the trust revocable, then the trust would not be valid.

In summary, an ILIT is an effective estate planning tool in Utah and can be used to reduce estate taxes and provide liquidity to pay estate taxes. To be valid, an ILIT must comply with the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and the case law established by Utah courts. The settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT, a “clear understanding” of the trust’s purpose and its benefits, and a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to protect assets and provide for the beneficiaries of an estate.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts Consultation

When you need business help with Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Goals of Estate Planning

Goals of Estate Planning

Goals of Estate Planning

Estate planning is an important process for people in Utah to consider. It is a way for individuals to take control of their assets and make sure that their wishes are carried out after they are gone. Estate planning can help ensure that the individual’s assets are distributed according to their wishes and that their family is taken care of. In Utah, there are specific goals that individuals should keep in mind when they are creating their estate plans.

The first goal of estate planning in Utah is to ensure the financial security of the individual’s family. This includes making sure that their spouse and children are provided for financially after the individual’s death. Estate planning can provide for the individual’s spouse and children by designating a beneficiary on life insurance policies, setting up trusts, or creating wills. It is important to have a plan in place to ensure that the individual’s family is taken care of financially after they are gone.

The second goal of estate planning in Utah is to minimize the tax burden on the individual’s family. Estate planning can help to reduce the taxes that the individual’s family will have to pay on their inheritance. This can be accomplished by taking advantage of certain tax benefits, such as using a trust or other estate-planning strategies. It is important to understand the tax implications of each estate-planning strategy so that the individual can make an informed decision about which one is best for their situation.

The third goal of estate planning in Utah is to ensure that the individual’s wishes are carried out after they are gone. Estate planning allows individuals to create documents that outline their wishes for the distribution of their assets after they are gone. This includes setting up trusts, creating wills, and making sure that their wishes are respected by the courts. By creating these documents, individuals can ensure that their wishes are followed after they are gone.

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The fourth goal of estate planning in Utah is to protect the individual’s assets from creditors. Estate planning can help individuals protect their assets from creditors by setting up trusts and other strategies. This can help ensure that the individual’s assets are not taken by creditors and that their family is taken care of financially.

The fifth goal of estate planning in Utah is to provide for the individual’s long-term care. Estate planning can help individuals plan for their long-term care needs by setting up trusts, creating wills, and taking advantage of other strategies. This can help ensure that the individual’s care needs are taken care of and that their wishes are respected by the courts.

The goals of estate planning in Utah are varied and can be tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances. It is important to understand the different goals of estate planning and to create a plan that takes into account the individual’s wishes and desires. By understanding the goals of estate planning in Utah, individuals can create a plan that will ensure that their wishes are carried out after they are gone and that their family is taken care of financially.

Estate Planning Consultation

When you need help with estate planning, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Business succession planning is an important part of the overall financial planning process for many business owners, especially those who own family businesses. A business succession plan is a document that outlines the steps to be taken in order to transfer ownership of a business to the next generation. It also provides a framework for addressing the financial needs of the business owners and their families, as well as the succession of the business itself.

Business succession planning should include an analysis of the business’s current value, and an assessment of the business owners’ financial needs, including estate taxes and other liabilities. Business owners should also consider potential candidates for ownership, including family members, key employees, and outside parties. Many business owners opt for a buy-sell agreement, which is a legal agreement between business owners and potential buyers to purchase the business interest in the event of the death or disability of a business owner.

In addition to buy-sell agreements, small business owners should also consider financial life insurance as a part of their succession planning. A life insurance policy can be used to fund the purchase of a business interest from a deceased or disabled business owner. The proceeds from such a life insurance policy can help to ensure that the business continues to thrive, and that the next generation of the family business is able to take over.

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For larger businesses, succession planning may also involve the use of member firms or key employees to ensure continuity of operations. It is important that the business owner carefully assess potential candidates for ownership, as well as the potential impact of their selection on the business’s value.

Business succession planning is an important part of the financial planning process for many business owners, especially those who own family businesses. By creating a comprehensive succession plan, business owners can ensure that their businesses are able to continue to thrive for generations to come. Furthermore, by implementing buy/sell agreements and life insurance policies, business owners can ensure that the financial needs of their families and the business itself are taken care of in the event of their death or disability.

Business Succession Planning

Business succession planning is the process in which long-term needs are identified and addressed. The main concern in succession planning is in providing for the continuation of business operations in the event that the owner or manager retires or suddenly becomes incapacitated or deceased. This can occur by several means, such as transferring leadership to the following generation of family members or by naming a specific person to become the next owner. It is highly advantageous to have a business succession plan. Such a plan can create several benefits for the business, including tax breaks and no gaps in business operations. The plan will be formally recorded in a document, which is usually drafted by an attorney. A business succession plan is similar to a contract in that it has binding effect on the parties who sign the document and consent to the plan. Therefore, the main advantage of having a succession plan is that the organization will be much better prepared to handle any unforeseen circumstances in the future. A well thought out succession plan will be both very broad in scope and specific in detailed instruction. It should include many provisions to address other concerns besides the issue of who will take over ownership.

A business succession plan should include:

• Approximate dates or time frames when succession will begin. For example, the projected date of the owner’s retirement. Instructions should also be composed for steps to take as the date approaches.

• Provisions for what should occur in case of the owner’s unexpected incapacitation, such as in the event of severe illness or death. A replacement should be named in these provisions, and you should state how long their responsibilities will last (i.e., permanent or temporary).

• Identification of who will be the next successor or a guideline for how election should occur, and instructions to ensure a smooth transition.

• A strategic plan for the business after the succession has taken place. This should include any new revisions to current policies and management structures.
As you might expect, there are many legal matters to be addressed when creating a succession plan. Some common issues that arise in connection with business succession include:

• Choice of successor: If the succession plan does not clearly name a successor, it can lead to disputes, especially amongst family members who may be inheriting the business. Be sure to state exactly who will take charge.

• Property distribution: If there is any property in the previous owner’s name, this will need to be addressed so that the property can be distributed upon or during transition.

• Type of business form: Every type of business has different requirements regarding succession. For example, if the business is a corporation, the previous owner’s name must be removed from the articles of incorporation and replaced with that of the successor’s name. On the other hand, partnerships will usually dissolve upon the death of a partner, and it must be re-formed unless specific provisions are made in a contract.

• Tax issues: Any outstanding taxes, debts, or unfinished business must be resolved. Also, if the owner has died, there may be issues with death taxes.

• Benefits: You should ask whether the business will continue to provide benefits even after the owner has retired. For example, health care, life insurance, and retirement pay must be addressed.

• Employment contracts: If there are any ongoing employment contracts, these must be honored so as to avoid an employment law disputes. For example, if there is going to be a change in management structure, it must take into account any provisions contained in the employees’ contracts.

Picking the Successor

When creating the business succession plan, it is crucial that the person that succeeds the current owner is able to continue the company successfully. Without this ability, many individuals may be crossed off the list. Otherwise, it is just easier to sell the organization to someone that the owner has not invested interest in, and the continued transactions and revenue mean nothing personal. One of the primary reasons to have a business succession plan is to ensure the company continues functioning after the owner either enters retirement or dies. For the successor to be a family member, he or she must be fully prepared to work hard and invest time and energy into the business. Many owners of a business have multiple family members or assistants that could take his or her place. It is important to assess both the strengths and weaknesses of each individual so he or she is able to choose the person best suited for the position. There could be resentment and negative emotions that affect the arrangement with other members of the family, and this must be taken into account along with keeping other relationships from becoming complicated such as a spouse or the manager of the business who may have assumed he or she would take on the ownership or full run of the company.

Finalizing the Process

While some may sell the company before retiring or death, it is still important to determine the value of the business before the plan is finalized. This means an appraisal and documentation with the successor’s name and information. Additional items may need to be purchased such as life insurance, liability coverage and various files with the transfer of ownership if the owner is ready to conclude the proceedings. The current owner may also be provided monetary compensation for his or her interest or a monthly stipend based on the profits of the company. These matters are determined by the paperwork and possession of the business. The transfer may be possible through a cross-purchase agreement where each party has a policy on the partners in the business. Each person is both owner and beneficiary simultaneously. This permits a buyout of shares or interest when one partner dies if necessary. An entity purchase occurs with the policy being both beneficiary and owner. Then the shares are transferred to the company upon the death of one person. Succession plans are commonly associated with retirement; however, they serve an important function earlier in the business lifespan: If anything unexpected happens to you or a co-owner, a succession plan can help reduce headaches, drama, and monetary loss. As the complexity of the business and the number of people impacted by the exit grows, so does the need for a well-written succession plan.
You should consider creating successions plan if you:

• Have complex processes: How will your employees and successor know how to operate the business once you exit? How will you duplicate your subject matter expertise?

• Employ more than just yourself: Who will step in to lead employees, administer human resources (HR) and payroll, and choose a successor and leadership structure?

• Have repeat clients and ongoing contracts: Where will clients go after your exit, and who will maintain relationships and deliver on long-term contracts?

• Have a successor in mind: How did you arrive at this decision, and are they aware and willing to take ownership?

When to Create a Small Business Succession Plan

Every business needs a succession plan to ensure that operations continue, and clients don’t experience a disruption in service. If you don’t already have a succession plan in place for your small business, this is something you should put together as soon as possible. While you may not plan to leave your business, unplanned exits do happen. In general, the closer a business owner gets to retirement age, the more urgent the need for a plan. Business owners should write a succession plan when a transfer of ownership is in sight, including when they intend to list their business for sale, retire, or transfer ownership of the business. This will ensure the business operates smoothly throughout the transition. There are several scenarios in which a business can change ownership. The type of succession plan you create may depend on a specific scenario. You may also wish to create a succession plan that addresses the unexpected, such as illness, accident, or death, in which case you should consider whether to include more than one potential successor.

Selling Your Business to a Co-owner

If you founded your business with a partner or partners, you may be considering your co-owners as potential successors. Many partnerships draft a mutual agreement that, in the event of one owner’s untimely death or disability, the remaining owners will agree to purchase their business interests from their next of kin. This type of agreement can help ease the burden of an unexpected transition—for the business and family members alike. A spouse might be interested in keeping their shares but may not have the time investment or experience to help it blossom. A buy-sell agreement ensures they’re given fair compensation, and allows the remaining co-owners to maintain control of the business.

Passing Your Business Onto an Heir

Choosing an heir as your successor is a popular option for business owners, especially those with children or family members working in their organization. It is regarded as an attractive option for providing for your family by handing them the reins to a successful, fully operational enterprise. Passing your business on to an heir is not without its complications. Some steps you can take to pass your business onto an heir smoothly are:

• Determine who will take over: This is an easy decision if you already have a single-family member involved in the business but gets more complicated when multiple family members are interested in taking over.

• Provide clear instructions: Include instructions on who will take over and how other heirs will be compensated.

• Consider a buy-sell agreement: Many succession plans include a buy-sell agreement that allows heirs that are not active in the business to sell their shares to those who are.

• Determine future leadership structure: In businesses where many heirs are involved, and only one will take over, you can simplify future discussions by providing clear instructions on how the structure should look moving forward.

Selling Your Business to a Key Employee

When you don’t have a co-owner or family member to entrust with your business, a key employee might be the right successor. Consider employees who are experienced, business-savvy, and respected by your staff, which can ease the transition. Your org chart can help with this. If you’re concerned about maintaining quality after your departure, a key employee is generally more reliable than an outside buyer. Just like selling to a co-owner, a key employee succession plan requires a buy-sell agreement. Your employee will agree to purchase your business at a predetermined retirement date, or in the event of death, disability, or other circumstance that renders you unable to manage the business.

Selling Your Business to an Outside Party

When there isn’t an obvious successor to take over, business owners may look to the community: Is there another entrepreneur, or even a competitor, that would purchase your business? To ensure that the business is sold for the proper amount, you will want to calculate the business value properly, and that the valuation is updated frequently. This is easier for some types of businesses than others. If you own a more turnkey operation, like a restaurant with a good general manager, your task is simply to demonstrate that it’s a good investment. They won’t have to get their hands dirty unless they want to and will ideally still have time to focus on their other business interests. Meanwhile, if you own a real estate company that’s branded under your own name, selling could potentially be more challenging. Buyers will recognize the need to rebrand and remarket and, as a result, may not be willing to pay full price. Instead, you should prepare your business for sale well in advance; hire and train a great general manager, formalize your operating procedures, and get all your finances in check. Make your business as stable and turnkey as possible, so it’s more attractive and valuable to outside buyers.

Selling Your Shares Back to the Company

The fifth option is available to businesses with multiple owners. An “entity purchase plan” or a “stock redemption plan” is an arrangement where the business purchases life insurance on each of the co-owners. When one owner dies, the business uses the life insurance proceeds to purchase the business interest from the deceased owner’s estate, thus giving each surviving owners a larger share of the business.

Reasons to Hire a Business Succession Attorney

• Decisions during the Idea Stage: Even before you officially open your doors for business, you have several decisions to make that will affect your daily operations going forward. What will you call your company? Is the name you have in mind available? What is your marketing tag line? Can you use that without encountering any problems? Where will your business be located? Are there any zoning issues of which you need to be aware? These are just a few examples of decisions that need to be made before you even start doing what it is you want to do. These decisions will be a lot easier to make with the help of a business attorney.

• Startup Protocols and Legal Requirements: Another early decision you’re going to have to make involves the specific type of business entity you want to initiate. You need to do so for several reasons, not the least of which is that most types of business entities require some sort of registration and all businesses will need to register and obtain a business license from the local municipalities in which they operate. In addition, you may need to provide public notice of the intention of starting a business entity, which could involve publishing that notice in a newspaper for four weeks. You need to do this right or you could face other problems, which is another reason why hiring a lawyer for your business startup is a wise decision.

• Banking Questions: If you’re going to start a business, you’re also going to need to open a bank account or perhaps multiple bank accounts. You may also need to apply for credit in the forms of credit cards and/or lines of credit if attainable. It’s highly advisable for a plethora of reasons to keep all of your business finances completely separate from your personal situation, as it’ll be much easier to organize those separate forms of finances come tax time or should any other questions arise. A small business attorney can help you choose the proper bank and the type of account or accounts you should look to open so you don’t wind up scrambling after you begin your core mission.

• Tax Questions: Since the founding of our country, a common quote that people tend to repeat in several contexts is, “Nothing is certain except for death and taxes.” What is not debatable is that your business will be taxed in one way or another, and you need a lawyer for your business startup to make sure that you’re both in compliance with local, state and federal tax codes and so that you’re not unnecessarily facing double taxes. Tax questions should be answered before you get started so you know what to generally expect in this regard, and from there you should work with a tax accountant for your specific tax questions.

• Insurance Questions: One of the issues that you’ll begin to hear and think more about as you get ready to start your business involves liability. You are responsible for the product or service you provide to your clients or customers, and you want to make sure that you’re protected from personal liability should something go wrong. You may also need to comply with regulations that require some sort of liability insurance coverage, but choosing the proper coverage and understanding the nature of that coverage are involved tasks that need to be done right. A small business attorney can help guide your business towards the coverage you need while simultaneously helping you minimize the chance for unexpected and unpleasant surprises down the road.

• Debt Management: For most Americans, debt is simply a part of life. For the majority of small business owners, debt is something that exists even before they open their doors. Debt is real and it doesn’t go away easily, and like anything else, questions, confusion and problems relating to debt can arise that can harm your ability to push your organization forward. The best way to manage debt issues is by way of advice from a business attorney who can explain the legalities involved with it and fight for you if there is a problem.

• Dispute Advocacy: It’s common for any business to encounter disputes of one type or another. It’s also unfortunately common for a startup business to wind up dealing with a problem with a vendor or some larger, more established entity. Regardless, owners need a small business attorney at the ready to fight for their company when such situations arise. An attorney who isn’t going to hesitate to advocate zealously for clients can level the playing field and even help resolve issues before they become much larger problems. In some cases, even mentioning that you have an attorney representing you could help avoid those problems altogether.

Logan Utah Business Succession Lawyer Consultation

When you need legal help from an attorney to help with a business succession, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Logan, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
Logan, Utah
City
Downtown Logan, with courthouse

Downtown Logan, with courthouse
Motto: 

“United in Service”
Location in Cache County and the state of Utah

Location in Cache County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 41°44′16″N 111°49′51″WCoordinates41°44′16″N 111°49′51″W
Country  United States
State  Utah
County Cache
Founded 1859
Incorporated January 17, 1866
Named for Ephraim Logan[1]
Government

 
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Holly H. Daines[2]
Area

 
 • Total 18.43 sq mi (47.74 km2)
 • Land 17.84 sq mi (46.22 km2)
 • Water 0.59 sq mi (1.52 km2)
Elevation

4,534 ft (1,382 m)
Population

 • Total 52,778
 • Density 2,957.5/sq mi (1,141.89/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP Codes
84321-84323, 84341
Area code 435
FIPS code 49-45860
GNIS ID 1442849[3]
Website www.loganutah.org

Logan is a city in Cache CountyUtah, United States. The 2020 census recorded the population was 52,778.[4][5] Logan is the county seat of Cache County[6] and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census[7][8] and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years.[9] Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

Logan, Utah

About Logan, Utah

Logan is a city in Cache County, Utah, United States. The 2020 census recorded the population was 52,778. Logan is the county seat of Cache County and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years. Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

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Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business succession is a process of transferring ownership and control of a business from one owner to another. It is important for businesses to have a succession plan in place, as it ensures continuity and a secure future for the business.

Succession planning begins with identifying and assessing potential successors. This involves looking at both internal and external candidates, and assessing their aptitude, skills, and experience to determine if they are suitable for the role. The business will also need to assess the financial implications of the succession.

Once a successor has been chosen, the business will need to develop a detailed plan for the transition. This includes outlining the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the successor, and creating a timeline for the transfer of ownership.

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In addition to the succession plan, the business will need to assess its legal and tax implications. This includes setting up a trust fund or other legal entity to hold the business assets, and ensuring that all taxes are paid.

The business will also need to consider the impact of the succession on its employees, customers, and stakeholders. This includes communicating the succession plan to those who will be affected, and putting measures in place to ensure that the transition is as smooth as possible.

Business succession is a complex process, but can be managed successfully with the right planning and preparation. A well-thought out succession plan will ensure that the business is in good hands, and will ensure its future success.

Business Succession Planning in Herriman Utah

Planning: Developing a comprehensive succession plan that takes into account the future needs of the business and its stakeholders. Planning is an essential part of any business succession, as it helps ensure that the transition of ownership, leadership, and management of the business is smooth and successful. Without proper planning, a business may face a number of challenges that can compromise its future sustainability, growth, and profitability.

At the outset, business owners should create a succession plan that clearly defines the ownership structure, the roles and responsibilities of each stakeholder, and the ownership and management transfer process. This plan should be regularly reviewed and updated to reflect any changes in the business’s structure, personnel, or operations. The plan should also consider the tax implications and legal requirements of the transfer.

Aside from ownership and management transfer, businesses should also plan for the financial needs of the business succession. A succession plan should include a detailed budget that considers the costs associated with the transfer of ownership, such as legal and accounting fees, transfer taxes, and other expenses. It should also include an analysis of the business’s current financial state and projections for future growth.

Business owners should also evaluate the succession plan’s effect on the business’s customer base, employees, and suppliers, as well as create a plan to ensure the effective communication of the transition to these stakeholders. Creating a smooth transition plan will help maintain customer trust and loyalty, as well as ensure that employees, suppliers, and other stakeholders are informed of the changes.

Finally, the business should have a plan for the future. This plan should include a vision for the future of the business, as well as strategies for achieving its desired objectives. It should also include an assessment of potential risks and an examination of the business’s competitive position in the industry.

Business succession planning is a complex process that requires careful consideration and strategic planning. By taking the time to create a comprehensive succession plan, business owners can ensure that their business is well-positioned for long-term success.

Financing a Business Succession

Financing: Securing the necessary funds to finance the succession. Financing is an essential part of business succession. It is the key to ensuring that the transition from one generation of business owners to the next is successful. Without proper financing, a business is likely to suffer from a lack of capital and liquidity, leading to decreased profits and a weakened competitive position in the marketplace. Financing also helps to ensure that the new ownership has the necessary resources to adequately manage the business and maintain a healthy financial position.

Financing gives business owners the ability to purchase assets that are necessary to the business’s success, such as new equipment, technology, and other resources. It also allows them to have access to working capital that can be used to hire additional personnel, purchase inventory, and make necessary investments in the business. For businesses that are transitioning from one generation of ownership to the next, financing can help to ensure that the successor has the necessary funds to continue operations.

Financing can also be used to help pay for the costs associated with business succession. These costs include settling any debts or obligations that are still owed to the prior generation of owners, as well as providing the necessary funds for the next generation of owners to purchase the business. Without proper financing, the new owners may not have the necessary resources to make the transition successful.

Financing is also important for providing the necessary capital to support the growth of the business. This includes providing the necessary funds to invest in new products or services, to expand into different markets, or to acquire additional resources. Without adequate financing, these types of investments may not be possible, leading to stagnation or even the failure of the business.

Finally, financing is essential to helping ensure that the new ownership can sustain the business in the long-term. This includes providing funds for the purchase of long-term assets, such as real estate, and for the development of new products or services. Without long-term financing, the business may not be able to compete effectively in the long run.

Transfer of Assets In Successions

The transfer of assets during business succession is a complex process that must be carefully planned and executed. Assets may include the business itself, real estate, investments, bank accounts, and intellectual property. Depending on the business structure, the transfer of assets may require the use of a corporate or legal entity such as an LLC, partnership, or corporation.

The transfer of assets begins with the business owner or their designated representative assessing the value of the assets. This includes determining the fair market value of each asset and making sure that all assets are properly documented. Once the value is determined, the business owner or their representative will need to decide how to transfer the assets. This could include a sale of the business, gifting of assets, or establishing a trust.

If the transfer is to be done through a sale, the business owner or their representative will need to create a sales agreement in which the buyer agrees to the terms of the sale. This agreement should include the price to be paid, the date the transfer will be completed, and the method of payment. To finalize the sale, the buyer and seller will need to register the transfer of assets with the appropriate governmental agencies.

If the transfer is being done through gifting, the business owner or their representative will need to create a gifting agreement in which the recipient agrees to the terms of the gift. This agreement should include the value of the gift, the date the transfer will be completed, and any restrictions or requirements the recipient must abide by. The agreement must also be registered with the appropriate governmental agencies.

Finally, if the transfer is being done through a trust, the business owner or their representative will need to create a trust agreement. This agreement should include the terms of the trust, such as who the beneficiary is, the type of trust being established, and the date the transfer will be completed. Depending on the type of trust, the trust agreement may need to be registered with the appropriate governmental agency.

Overall, the transfer of assets during business succession is a complex process that requires careful planning and execution. By understanding the value of the assets, the method of transfer, and the necessary paperwork, the business owner or their representative can ensure that the transfer of assets is done properly and that the business is passed on to the intended recipient.

Business Succession Transition Management

Transition Management: Ensuring a smooth transition from the current owner to the successor. Transition management is an important part of business succession planning. It is the process of successfully transferring the ownership, management and operations of a business from one generation to the next. It is a complex process that involves understanding the business, its goals and objectives, the current leadership and management structure, the transfer of ownership, and the transition of control of the business from the current owners to the next generation.

Transition management requires a thorough understanding of the current state of the business and its environment, as well as a plan for the future. The current owners must have a clear understanding of their role in the transition and what they will be leaving behind. This includes an understanding of the current financial state of the business, the current organizational structure, the current legal structure, the current markets, the current customers, and the current competition.

The business succession plan should also include a strategy for the future of the business. This plan should include an analysis of the current business environment, the future markets and customers, the legal requirements for transitioning the business, the financial implications of the transition, and the strategy for transferring ownership, management and operations of the business.

The transition management process also involves the selection of a new owner and the negotiation of a transfer agreement. This agreement should include the transfer of ownership, the transfer of management and operations, the terms of the transfer, and the terms of the agreement. It should also include provisions for the payment of taxes, the transfer of assets, the transfer of liabilities, and the transfers of intellectual property rights.

It is important for the current owners to develop a clear understanding of the transition process and to ensure that all legal and financial requirements are met. It is also important to ensure that the transition is smooth and successful. By taking the time to plan and prepare for the transition, the current owners can ensure that the future of the business is secure and successful.

Support From Your Business Succession Lawyer in Herriman Utah

Support: Providing the necessary advice, guidance and support to ensure the success of the succession. Business succession is an important part of any business, particularly when a business is passed from one generation to the next. It involves a complex process of transferring ownership, assets, and liabilities from one generation to the next. It is a critical process that can have significant implications for the future of the business, as well as the future of the family. As such, it is important to ensure that the succession process is managed properly, and with the utmost care.

One of the most important aspects of a successful business succession is the involvement of a lawyer. A lawyer can provide valuable insight into the legal and financial aspects of the process, and can ensure that the transition is conducted in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. A lawyer can also provide guidance in the development of an estate plan, which is essential for protecting the family’s assets and minimizing taxes. A lawyer can help to ensure that the transfer of ownership is done in an orderly and efficient manner, and in accordance with the wishes of the family.

In addition, a lawyer can provide advice on the structure of the business and the best way to transfer ownership and assets. A lawyer can also provide advice on the proper way to handle any disputes that may arise during the succession process. Furthermore, a lawyer can provide guidance on any tax implications associated with the succession, and can help to ensure that all required documents are properly prepared and filed.

Finally, a lawyer can provide invaluable advice and guidance throughout the entire succession process. This can help to ensure that the transition is smooth and successful, and that the family’s interests are adequately protected. Without the assistance of a lawyer, it is much more likely that the process will be complicated and potentially costly.

In conclusion, the support of a lawyer is essential as part of a business succession. A lawyer can provide invaluable guidance and advice throughout the entire process, and can help to ensure that the succession is conducted in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. Through the assistance of a lawyer, the succession process can be completed quickly and efficiently, and the family’s interests can be adequately protected.

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah Consultation

When you need legal help from a Business Succession Lawyer in Herrimann Utah, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Herriman, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Herriman, Utah
Unified Fire Authority Station 103, located on Main Street

Unified Fire Authority Station 103, located on Main Street
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°30′24″N 112°1′51″WCoordinates40°30′24″N 112°1′51″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Settled 1851
Incorporated 1999
Became a city April 19, 2001
Founded by Thomas Butterfield
Named for Henry Harriman
Government

 
 • Type Mayor-Council
 • Mayor Lorin Palmer[2]
Area

 • Total 21.63 sq mi (56.03 km2)
 • Land 21.63 sq mi (56.03 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
5,000 ft (1,524 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 55,144[1]
 • Density 2,549.42/sq mi (984.19/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST) UTC-6 (Mountain)
ZIP code
84096
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-34970[4]
GNIS feature ID 1428675[5]
Website http://www.herriman.org

Herriman (/ˈhɛrɪmən/ HERR-ih-mən) is a city in southwestern Salt Lake CountyUtah. The population was 55,144 as of the 2020 census.[1] Although Herriman was a town in 2000,[4] it has since been classified as a fourth-class city by state law.[6] The city has experienced rapid growth since incorporation in 1999, as its population was just 1,523 at the 2000 census.[7] It grew from being the 111th-largest incorporated place in Utah in 2000 to the 14th-largest in 2020.

Herriman, Utah

About Herriman, Utah

Herriman is a city in southwestern Salt Lake County, Utah. The population was 55,144 as of the 2020 census. Although Herriman was a town in 2000, it has since been classified as a fourth-class city by state law. The city has experienced rapid growth since incorporation in 1999, as its population was just 1,523 at the 2000 census. It grew from being the 111th-largest incorporated place in Utah in 2000 to the 14th-largest in 2020.

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Map of Herriman, Utah

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