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Legal Requirements To Form A Trust

“Secure Your Future with Legal Requirements To Form A Trust!”

Introduction

A trust is a legal arrangement that allows a person or organization to hold assets on behalf of another person or organization. It is a way to manage and protect assets for the benefit of another person or organization. The trust is created by a settlor, who transfers assets to a trustee, who holds and manages the assets for the benefit of the beneficiaries. The trust is governed by the terms of the trust document, which sets out the rights and obligations of the parties involved. In order to form a trust, there are certain legal requirements that must be met. This article will discuss the legal requirements to form a trust.

What You Need to Know About the Formation Documents for a Trust

Trusts are a popular estate planning tool used to manage assets and provide for beneficiaries. The formation documents for a trust are the legal documents that create the trust and set out the terms and conditions of the trust. It is important to understand the contents of these documents in order to ensure that the trust is properly established and that the trust’s purpose is achieved.

The formation documents for a trust typically include the trust agreement, the trust deed, and any other documents that are necessary to establish the trust. The trust agreement is the document that sets out the terms and conditions of the trust, including the purpose of the trust, the trustee’s duties and responsibilities, the beneficiaries of the trust, and the trust’s assets. The trust deed is the document that transfers the assets of the trust to the trustee.

The formation documents for a trust should also include any other documents that are necessary to establish the trust, such as a will, a power of attorney, or a deed of appointment. These documents may be necessary to ensure that the trust is properly established and that the trust’s purpose is achieved.

When creating the formation documents for a trust, it is important to ensure that all of the necessary documents are included and that all of the information is accurate. It is also important to ensure that the trust is properly funded and that the trust’s assets are properly managed.

The formation documents for a trust should be reviewed by a qualified attorney to ensure that the trust is properly established and that the trust’s purpose is achieved. An attorney can also provide advice on how to best manage the trust’s assets and ensure that the trust’s beneficiaries are properly provided for.

What Is A Grantor in a Trust?

A grantor is the individual who creates a trust. The grantor is also known as the trustor, settlor, or trustmaker. The grantor is the person who transfers assets into the trust and appoints a trustee to manage the trust assets. The grantor is responsible for providing the trustee with instructions on how to manage the trust assets and how to distribute them to the beneficiaries. The grantor also has the power to revoke or amend the trust at any time. The grantor is typically the person who will benefit from the trust, either directly or indirectly.

What Is The Corpus of a Trust?

The corpus of a trust is the total amount of money or assets that are held in the trust. It is the principal sum of money or assets that are placed into the trust by the grantor, or the person who creates the trust. The corpus of the trust is managed by the trustee, who is responsible for investing and managing the trust assets in accordance with the terms of the trust. The corpus of the trust can be used to provide income to the beneficiaries of the trust, or it can be used to pay for expenses related to the trust. The corpus of the trust can also be used to make charitable donations or to fund other activities that are in accordance with the terms of the trust.

What Is The Beneficiary of a Trust?

The beneficiary of a trust is the individual or entity that is entitled to receive the trust’s assets or income. The beneficiary is the person or entity for whom the trust was created and who will benefit from the trust’s assets. The beneficiary may be an individual, a group of individuals, a charity, or an organization.

The trust document will specify the beneficiary’s rights and responsibilities. Generally, the beneficiary has the right to receive the trust’s income and assets, as well as the right to information about the trust’s activities. The beneficiary may also have the right to request changes to the trust’s terms or to terminate the trust.

The trustee is responsible for managing the trust’s assets and income in accordance with the trust document and applicable laws. The trustee must act in the best interests of the beneficiary and must ensure that the trust’s assets are used for the benefit of the beneficiary.

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The beneficiary of a trust is the person or entity who will benefit from the trust’s assets and income. The trust document will specify the beneficiary’s rights and responsibilities, and the trustee is responsible for managing the trust’s assets and income in accordance with the trust document and applicable laws.

What You Need to Know About the Grantor and Beneficiaries of a Trust

A trust is a legal arrangement in which a grantor transfers assets to a trustee to manage for the benefit of one or more beneficiaries. The grantor is the individual who creates the trust and transfers assets into it. The trustee is the individual or entity responsible for managing the trust assets according to the terms of the trust document. The beneficiaries are the individuals or entities who benefit from the trust assets.

It is important to understand the roles and responsibilities of each of these parties in order to ensure that the trust is properly managed and that the beneficiaries receive the intended benefits.

The grantor is the individual who creates the trust and transfers assets into it. The grantor has the authority to determine the terms of the trust, including who will be the trustee and who will be the beneficiaries. The grantor also has the authority to revoke or amend the trust at any time.

The trustee is the individual or entity responsible for managing the trust assets according to the terms of the trust document. The trustee has a fiduciary duty to act in the best interests of the beneficiaries and must manage the trust assets in accordance with the terms of the trust document. The trustee is also responsible for filing any necessary tax returns and ensuring that the trust assets are distributed according to the terms of the trust.

The beneficiaries are the individuals or entities who benefit from the trust assets. The grantor can designate any individual or entity as a beneficiary, including themselves. The beneficiaries have the right to receive distributions from the trust according to the terms of the trust document.

It is important to understand the roles and responsibilities of each of these parties in order to ensure that the trust is properly managed and that the beneficiaries receive the intended benefits. A qualified attorney can provide guidance on the creation and management of a trust.

How to Choose the Right Trustee for Your Trust

Choosing the right trustee for your trust is an important decision that should not be taken lightly. A trustee is responsible for managing the trust assets and ensuring that the trust is administered according to the terms of the trust document. The trustee must also act in the best interests of the beneficiaries of the trust.

When selecting a trustee, it is important to consider the individual’s qualifications, experience, and trustworthiness. The trustee should have a thorough understanding of trust law and the ability to manage the trust assets in a prudent manner. It is also important to consider the trustee’s availability and willingness to serve.

The trustee should be someone who is trustworthy and reliable. The trustee should also be someone who is familiar with the trust document and the wishes of the grantor. It is important to select a trustee who is willing to act in the best interests of the beneficiaries and who is willing to communicate with them regularly.

It is also important to consider the trustee’s fees. The trustee should be compensated for their services, but the fees should be reasonable and in line with industry standards.

Finally, it is important to select a trustee who is willing to work with the grantor and the beneficiaries to ensure that the trust is administered according to the grantor’s wishes. The trustee should be willing to provide regular updates and to answer any questions that the beneficiaries may have.

Choosing the right trustee for your trust is an important decision that should not be taken lightly. It is important to select a trustee who is qualified, experienced, and trustworthy. The trustee should also be willing to act in the best interests of the beneficiaries and to communicate regularly with them. Finally, the trustee should be compensated fairly for their services.

What You Need to Know About the Tax Implications of Forming a Trust

Forming a trust can be a great way to protect your assets and ensure that your wishes are carried out after you pass away. However, it is important to understand the tax implications of forming a trust before you make any decisions.

First, it is important to understand the different types of trusts. A revocable trust, also known as a living trust, allows you to make changes to the trust during your lifetime. An irrevocable trust, on the other hand, cannot be changed once it is created.

The tax implications of forming a trust depend on the type of trust you create. A revocable trust is treated as part of your estate for tax purposes, meaning that any income generated by the trust is taxed as part of your estate. An irrevocable trust, however, is treated as a separate entity for tax purposes, meaning that any income generated by the trust is taxed separately from your estate.

In addition, it is important to understand the gift tax implications of forming a trust. If you transfer assets to a revocable trust, the transfer is not subject to the gift tax. However, if you transfer assets to an irrevocable trust, the transfer may be subject to the gift tax.

Finally, it is important to understand the estate tax implications of forming a trust. If you transfer assets to a revocable trust, the transfer is not subject to the estate tax. However, if you transfer assets to an irrevocable trust, the transfer may be subject to the estate tax.

Forming a trust can be a great way to protect your assets and ensure that your wishes are carried out after you pass away. However, it is important to understand the tax implications of forming a trust before you make any decisions. Consulting with a qualified tax professional can help you understand the tax implications of forming a trust and ensure that you make the best decision for your situation.

Forming a trust is a complex legal process that requires a thorough understanding of the applicable laws and regulations. A trust is a legal arrangement in which one or more persons, known as trustees, hold legal title to property for the benefit of another person or persons, known as beneficiaries. Trusts can be used for a variety of purposes, including estate planning, asset protection, and charitable giving.

In order to form a trust, the settlor (the person creating the trust) must meet certain legal requirements. First, the settlor must have legal capacity to create the trust. This means that the settlor must be of legal age and of sound mind. Second, the settlor must have a valid purpose for creating the trust. The purpose must be clearly stated in the trust document. Third, the trust must have a valid beneficiary. The beneficiary must be clearly identified in the trust document. Fourth, the trust must have a valid trustee. The trustee must be legally qualified to manage the trust assets. Fifth, the trust must have a valid source of funds. The trust must be funded with assets that are legally owned by the settlor.

In addition to these legal requirements, the settlor must also comply with any applicable state or federal laws. For example, some states require that the trust document be filed with the state in order to be valid. Other states may require that the trust be registered with the state in order to be valid. It is important to consult with an attorney to ensure that all applicable laws and regulations are followed when forming a trust.

Forming a trust is a complex legal process that requires a thorough understanding of the applicable laws and regulations. It is important to consult with an attorney to ensure that all legal requirements are met and that the trust is properly established.

Why You Need A Trust Lawyer To Help You With Trusts

Trusts are an important part of estate planning, and they can be complex and difficult to understand. A trust lawyer can help you navigate the complexities of trust law and ensure that your trust is set up correctly.

Trusts are legal documents that allow you to transfer assets to another person or entity. They can be used to protect assets from creditors, provide for family members, or manage assets for a beneficiary. Trusts can also be used to minimize taxes and provide for charitable giving.

Trusts are governed by state law, and each state has its own set of rules and regulations. A trust lawyer can help you understand the laws in your state and ensure that your trust is set up correctly. They can also help you determine the best way to structure your trust to meet your goals.

A trust lawyer can also help you with the administration of your trust. They can help you manage the assets in the trust, ensure that the trust is properly funded, and handle any disputes that may arise. They can also help you with the distribution of assets when the trust is terminated.

Trusts can be complicated and difficult to understand. A trust lawyer can help you navigate the complexities of trust law and ensure that your trust is set up correctly. They can also help you manage the assets in the trust and handle any disputes that may arise. With the help of a trust lawyer, you can ensure that your trust is set up correctly and that your assets are managed properly.

Q&A

1. What is a trust?
A trust is a legal arrangement in which one or more persons (the trustees) hold legal title to property for the benefit of another person or persons (the beneficiaries).

2. What are the legal requirements to form a trust?
The legal requirements to form a trust vary by jurisdiction, but generally include the following: (1) a written trust agreement; (2) a settlor (the person creating the trust); (3) a trustee (the person or persons managing the trust); (4) a beneficiary (the person or persons receiving the benefits of the trust); (5) a trust corpus (the property or assets held in the trust); and (6) a valid purpose for the trust.

3. Who can be a settlor of a trust?
A settlor of a trust can be any individual or entity with legal capacity to enter into a contract.

4. Who can be a trustee of a trust?
A trustee of a trust can be any individual or entity with legal capacity to manage the trust.

5. Who can be a beneficiary of a trust?
A beneficiary of a trust can be any individual or entity with legal capacity to receive the benefits of the trust.

6. What types of property can be held in a trust?
Any type of property or asset can be held in a trust, including real estate, stocks, bonds, cash, and other investments.

7. What is the purpose of a trust?
The purpose of a trust is to provide for the management and distribution of assets for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

8. What are the tax implications of a trust?
The tax implications of a trust depend on the type of trust and the jurisdiction in which it is created. Generally, trusts are subject to income tax, estate tax, and gift tax.

9. Are there any other legal requirements to form a trust?
Yes, depending on the jurisdiction, there may be additional legal requirements to form a trust, such as filing documents with the court or registering the trust with the state.

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When you need help with a trust call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

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(801) 613-1472

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Legal Requirements To Form A Trust

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Special Needs Trust

“Secure Your Loved One’s Future with a Special Needs Trust”

Introduction

A Special Needs Trust (SNT) is a trust created to provide financial support for individuals with disabilities. It is designed to supplement, not replace, government benefits such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. The trust is managed by a trustee who is responsible for managing the trust assets and making distributions to the beneficiary. The trust can be used to pay for medical expenses, educational expenses, and other items that are not covered by government benefits. The trust can also provide a source of income for the beneficiary. The trust can be established by a parent, grandparent, or other family member, or it can be established by a court. The trust can be funded with cash, investments, real estate, or other assets. The trust can also be funded with a life insurance policy. The trust is designed to provide financial security for the beneficiary while preserving their eligibility for government benefits.

How to Use a Special Needs Trust to Protect Government Benefits for a Disabled Person

A Special Needs Trust (SNT) is an important tool for protecting government benefits for a disabled person. An SNT is a trust that is established for the benefit of a disabled person, and it is designed to supplement, not replace, government benefits.

When setting up an SNT, it is important to ensure that the trust is properly drafted and administered. The trust should be drafted to meet the requirements of the particular government benefits program, such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicaid. The trust should also be drafted to ensure that the disabled person is the sole beneficiary of the trust.

The trust should be administered by a trustee who is knowledgeable about the government benefits program and the trust’s purpose. The trustee should be familiar with the rules and regulations of the government benefits program and should be able to ensure that the trust is administered in accordance with those rules.

The trust should also be funded with assets that are not considered countable resources for the government benefits program. This means that the assets in the trust should not be counted as part of the disabled person’s resources when determining eligibility for the government benefits program.

The trust should also be structured to ensure that the disabled person is able to access the funds in the trust for supplemental needs, such as medical care, education, and other expenses. The trust should also be structured to ensure that the funds are not used for basic needs, such as food and shelter, which would be provided by the government benefits program.

By properly setting up and administering an SNT, it is possible to protect government benefits for a disabled person while providing supplemental funds for their needs. An SNT can be an invaluable tool for ensuring that a disabled person is able to access the resources they need to live a full and independent life.

What to Consider When Choosing a Trustee for a Special Needs Trust

When choosing a trustee for a special needs trust, it is important to consider several factors. First, the trustee should have a thorough understanding of the trust’s purpose and the beneficiary’s needs. The trustee should be familiar with the laws and regulations governing special needs trusts, as well as the tax implications of the trust.

Second, the trustee should have the necessary skills and experience to manage the trust. This includes having the ability to make sound financial decisions, as well as the ability to manage the trust’s assets. The trustee should also have the time and resources to properly administer the trust.

Third, the trustee should be trustworthy and reliable. The trustee should be someone who is willing to act in the best interests of the beneficiary and who will not take advantage of the trust’s assets.

Finally, the trustee should be someone who is willing to communicate with the beneficiary and other parties involved in the trust. The trustee should be willing to answer questions and provide updates on the trust’s progress.

Choosing the right trustee for a special needs trust is an important decision. It is important to take the time to find a trustee who is knowledgeable, experienced, and trustworthy.

How to Create a Special Needs Trust for a Loved One

Creating a special needs trust for a loved one is an important step in ensuring their financial security and quality of life. A special needs trust is a legal document that allows a person with a disability to receive money or other assets without losing eligibility for government benefits. It also allows the trust to pay for items and services that are not covered by government programs.

The first step in creating a special needs trust is to consult with an attorney who specializes in estate planning and special needs trusts. An attorney can help you understand the legal requirements and provide guidance on how to structure the trust.

The trust document should include the name of the beneficiary, the purpose of the trust, and the trustee. The trustee is the person who will manage the trust and make decisions about how the money is used. The trust document should also include instructions on how the money should be used, such as for medical expenses, education, housing, or other needs.

Once the trust document is complete, it must be signed by the beneficiary and the trustee. The trust must also be funded with assets, such as cash, investments, or real estate. The assets must be transferred to the trust in accordance with state law.

Finally, the trust must be registered with the state and the Social Security Administration. This will ensure that the trust is recognized as a valid legal entity and that the beneficiary will not lose eligibility for government benefits.

Creating a special needs trust for a loved one is an important step in ensuring their financial security and quality of life. With the help of an experienced attorney, you can create a trust that meets the needs of your loved one and ensures that their future is secure.

Understanding the Different Types of Special Needs Trusts

Special needs trusts are an important tool for providing financial security for individuals with disabilities. They are designed to supplement government benefits and provide additional resources for the beneficiary’s care and quality of life. There are several different types of special needs trusts, each with its own unique features and benefits.

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The first type of special needs trust is a self-settled trust. This type of trust is funded with the beneficiary’s own assets, such as an inheritance or a personal injury settlement. The trust is designed to provide supplemental resources for the beneficiary’s care without affecting their eligibility for government benefits.

The second type of special needs trust is a third-party trust. This type of trust is funded with assets from someone other than the beneficiary, such as a parent or grandparent. The trust is designed to provide supplemental resources for the beneficiary’s care without affecting their eligibility for government benefits.

The third type of special needs trust is a pooled trust. This type of trust is managed by a non-profit organization and is funded with the assets of multiple beneficiaries. The trust is designed to provide supplemental resources for the beneficiary’s care without affecting their eligibility for government benefits.

The fourth type of special needs trust is a payback trust. This type of trust is funded with the beneficiary’s own assets, such as an inheritance or a personal injury settlement. The trust is designed to provide supplemental resources for the beneficiary’s care without affecting their eligibility for government benefits. Upon the death of the beneficiary, the trust must pay back any remaining funds to the government.

Each type of special needs trust has its own unique features and benefits. It is important to understand the differences between the various types of trusts in order to determine which one is best suited for your particular situation. An experienced attorney can help you understand the different types of special needs trusts and determine which one is right for you.

What is a Special Needs Trust and How Can it Benefit a Disabled Person?

A Special Needs Trust (SNT) is a type of trust that is specifically designed to provide financial support for a disabled person without jeopardizing their eligibility for government benefits. The trust is typically funded by a third party, such as a family member or friend, and is managed by a trustee who is responsible for making sure the funds are used for the benefit of the disabled person.

The primary purpose of a Special Needs Trust is to supplement the government benefits that the disabled person is already receiving. The trust can be used to pay for items and services that are not covered by government benefits, such as medical expenses, educational expenses, recreational activities, and other items that may improve the quality of life for the disabled person.

A Special Needs Trust can also be used to provide financial security for the disabled person in the event of the death of the third-party donor. The trust can be used to pay for funeral expenses, as well as provide a source of income for the disabled person.

In addition to providing financial support, a Special Needs Trust can also provide peace of mind for the disabled person and their family. The trust can be used to ensure that the disabled person’s needs are met, even if the third-party donor is no longer able to provide financial support.

Overall, a Special Needs Trust can be a valuable tool for providing financial support and security for a disabled person. It can help to ensure that the disabled person’s needs are met, while also protecting their eligibility for government benefits.

Why You Need a Special Needs Trust Lawyer To Help You.

When it comes to planning for the future of a loved one with special needs, it is important to have the right legal guidance. A special needs trust lawyer can help you create a trust that will provide for the long-term care and financial security of your loved one.

A special needs trust is a legal document that allows you to set aside money or other assets for the benefit of a person with special needs. The trust can be used to pay for medical expenses, educational expenses, and other costs associated with the care of the beneficiary. The trust can also be used to provide for the beneficiary’s future needs, such as housing, transportation, and other necessities.

A special needs trust lawyer can help you create a trust that meets the specific needs of your loved one. The lawyer can help you determine the best way to structure the trust, as well as the best way to manage the trust’s assets. The lawyer can also help you understand the tax implications of setting up a trust and can provide advice on how to ensure that the trust is properly funded.

A special needs trust lawyer can also help you navigate the complex legal and financial issues associated with setting up a trust. The lawyer can help you understand the laws and regulations that govern trusts, as well as the various tax implications of setting up a trust. The lawyer can also provide advice on how to ensure that the trust is properly funded and managed.

Having a special needs trust lawyer on your side can help you ensure that your loved one’s future is secure. The lawyer can provide you with the legal guidance and advice you need to create a trust that meets the specific needs of your loved one. With the right legal guidance, you can ensure that your loved one’s future is secure and that their needs are met.

Q&A

1. What is a Special Needs Trust?
A Special Needs Trust (SNT) is a trust created for the benefit of a person with a disability. It is designed to supplement, not replace, government benefits such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid.

2. Who can create a Special Needs Trust?
A Special Needs Trust can be created by a parent, grandparent, legal guardian, or court.

3. What are the benefits of a Special Needs Trust?
A Special Needs Trust can provide additional resources to a person with a disability without jeopardizing their eligibility for government benefits. It can also provide for the person’s medical and other needs that are not covered by government benefits.

4. What types of assets can be placed in a Special Needs Trust?
Assets that can be placed in a Special Needs Trust include cash, stocks, bonds, real estate, and other investments.

5. Who manages the assets in a Special Needs Trust?
The assets in a Special Needs Trust are managed by a trustee, who is responsible for investing and managing the trust assets in accordance with the trust document.

6. What happens to the assets in a Special Needs Trust when the beneficiary dies?
When the beneficiary of a Special Needs Trust dies, the assets in the trust are distributed according to the terms of the trust document. Any remaining assets may be distributed to the beneficiary’s heirs or to charity.

Special Needs Trust Consultation

When you need help with a Special Needs Trust call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Different Trust Types

Different Trust Types

If you’ve been doing research on the subject of estate planning, you’ve likely run into a lot of different acronyms and trust-types. It can be hard to keep track of them all!

The most common type of trust that most people encounter is the revocable living trust. So first, if you haven’t already, you might want to start by reading some other FAQs:

What is a revocable living trust?

A revocable living trust is a legal arrangement whereby a person (the grantor) transfers ownership of their assets to another person (the trustee) for the purpose of managing those assets for the benefit of the grantor or a third party (the beneficiary). This arrangement is revocable, meaning that the grantor can make changes to the trust or terminate it at any time. Unlike a will, the trust is not subject to probate and the assets pass directly to the beneficiary without the need for court approval.

A revocable living trust can be used in many different ways. For example, it may be used to provide for the care of a minor child or an incapacitated adult, to provide for the management of a disabled person’s assets, or to provide for an orderly distribution of assets upon death. It can also be used to avoid probate, minimize estate taxes, and protect assets from creditors.

The grantor retains control of the trust and can modify or revoke it at any time. The grantor also has the power to appoint a successor trustee in the event of their death or incapacity. The trustee will have the power to manage the trust assets in accordance with the terms of the trust agreement.

The revocable living trust is a powerful estate planning tool that can help individuals manage their assets during their lifetime and provide for their beneficiaries upon death. It can also provide a measure of privacy, since the details of the trust do not become public record upon death. As with any legal arrangement, it is important to consult with a qualified attorney to ensure that the trust meets your individual needs.
What are some of the benefits of a revocable living trust?

What’s the Difference between a Testamentary Trust, a Revocable Living Trust, and an Irrevocable Living Trust?

A testamentary trust is a trust created by a will upon the death of the grantor and funded with the grantor’s assets after death. A revocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor retains the right to revoke or modify the trust. An irrevocable living trust is a trust created during the grantor’s lifetime and the grantor cannot revoke or modify the trust.

The main difference between a testamentary trust, a revocable living trust, and an irrevocable living trust is the time of creation and the ability to modify or revoke the terms of the trust. A testamentary trust is created upon the death of the grantor, while a revocable living trust and an irrevocable living trust are created during the grantor’s lifetime. Additionally, the grantor of a revocable living trust can modify and revoke the trust, while the grantor of an irrevocable living trust cannot modify or revoke the trust.

All three types of trusts can be used for a variety of purposes, including estate planning, asset protection, and tax planning. However, testamentary trusts and irrevocable living trusts are often used for estate planning purposes since they allow for the grantor to control how their assets are distributed after death. Revocable living trusts, on the other hand, are often used for asset protection and tax planning purposes since they allow the grantor to protect their assets and minimize their tax liability.

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Ultimately, testamentary trusts, revocable living trusts, and irrevocable living trusts each have their own unique advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to determine which type of trust best fits your needs.

Estate planning strategies which work well while interest rates are low include, intra-family loans, grantor retained annuity trusts (GRATs), sales to intentionally defective grantor trusts (IDGTs) and charitable lead annuity trusts (CLATs). When rates are higher, more efficient and commonly deployed strategies include charitable remainder annuity trusts (CRATs) and qualified personal residence trusts (QPRTs). If you are thinking about estate planning, in the midst of such planning, or even if your wealth transfers are complete, prevailing interest rates can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of your planning.

A trust can be created for a variety of reasons including for income or estate tax purposes, veterans benefits planning, Medicaid planning, asset protection planning, charitable planning, or for business succession purposes.

Here’s a guide to help you understand some of the other types of trusts:

Asset Protection Trust

: An asset protection trust is generally a generic name used to refer to a trust that has been set up for asset protection purposes such as to reduce exposure to lawsuits and malpractice claims, bankruptcy, creditors, divorce or remarriage, or nursing home expenses. Asset Protection Trusts come in many different forms depending upon who you are trying to protect (you or other beneficiaries) and what you’re trying to protect from (lawsuits, creditors, divorce, taxes, etc.).

Charitable Lead Trust

: Under a charitable lead trust, a designated charity receives income from the assets held by the trust and the assets then later pass to beneficiaries named by the Trustmaker. Charitable lead trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the gifts being made.

Charitable Remainder Trust

: A charitable remainder trust is essentially the converse of a charitable lead trust. With a charitable remainder trust, the Trustmaker or a beneficiary designated by the Trustmaker receives income from the trust for a specified period of time, such as the Trustmaker’s lifetime or a designated period of years. When the income beneficiary’s interest ends, the trust assets then passed to a designated charity. Again, charitable remainder trusts may be used for tax planning purposes to take advantage of charitable deductions associated with the charitable bequests being made.

Credit Shelter Trust

: In our office, we tend to call these the “Family Trust”. They are also sometimes referred to as a “bypass trust.” Without getting too bogged down in estate tax law, it’s an estate tax planning tool used with a revocable living trust for a married couple to ensure that as a couple, they maximize their estate tax exemption (the amount that you can pass free of estate taxes).

Education Trust

: This is a tool sometimes used by parents or grandparents that want to set aside funds for college expenses while receiving estate tax benefits.

Equestrian Trust (ET)

: An equestrian trust is a form of Pet Trust for horses.

Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs)

: These are trusts that provide certain tax benefits. Generally, the Trustmaker transfers an asset that is expected to significantly grow in value to the trust for less than its full market value. GRATs and GRUTs may be used to remove the full value of the asset and its future appreciation from the Trustmaker’s taxable estate to reduce future estate taxes upon death.

This is a trust used to set aside a certain amount of funds to provide for the continued care of one’s pets such as horses, dogs, cats, tropical birds, or other pets. A pet trust allows you to leave detailed instructions about how you want the pet provided for, who will provide care and ensure there are sufficient financial resources to provide such care without burdening your loved ones with such responsibility or financial burden. A Pet Trust is strongly recommended when you have pets with a longer lifespan (e.g., horses, tropical birds, etc.) and/or pets that are costly to maintain (e.g., horses, show dogs, etc.).

Grantor Trust

The term “Grantor Trust” is used to refer to a trust that is taxed to the Grantor (the person that created the trust) for either income tax purposes, estate tax purposes, or both.

Heir Safeguard Trust

: An Heir Safeguard Trust is a term used in Family Estate Planning to refer to a trust that has been designed to protect the inheritance from the beneficiary’s future potential lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Intentionally Defective Grantor Trust (IDGT)

: Intentional or not, who wants to be told they have a defective trust, right? The name of these trusts refers to the somewhat contradictory tax treatment that they receive. The trust terms are drafted such that the assets held by the trust will not be counted as part of your taxable estate for estate tax purposes. But at the same time, the trust agreement includes an intentional ‘flaw’ that allows you to continue paying the income taxes on the assets (and by making such payments yourself instead of by your children, this continues to further reduce your taxable estate). This can be a particularly appealing tax planning option if interest rates are low and/or values of the assets have depreciated such as during a real estate or stock market downturn.

Inter Vivos Trust

: Inter Vivos Trust is Latin for a Living Trust. The term “Living Trust” simply refers to a trust that comes into being during the Trustmaker’s lifetime rather than a Testamentary Trust which does not come into creation until after the Trustmaker’s death.

IRA Trust

: An IRA Trust refers to a trust that is specially designed for retirement plans such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and similar. Generally, the purpose of the Stretchout Protection Trust is to protect the income-tax benefits of the retirement plan while also protecting the retirement plan from future lawsuits, creditors, or divorce.

Irrevocable Trust

: Irrevocable trusts are used for many different reasons. With a Revocable Living Trust, you have the right to amend any or all of the terms or revoke it entirely. At its most basic level, an irrevocable trust means that somewhere in the trust document there is a power that you gave up permanently and cannot change without either court approval or the approval of all of the trust beneficiaries. For example, you may have given up the right to withdraw principal or change the beneficiaries. Thus, these trusts tend to be a bit more “set in stone,” but the degree to which they are set in stone depends on their purposes. For example, some of the irrevocable trusts that we use for Medicaid planning and veterans benefits planning still have some flexibility. Other irrevocable trusts are used for tax planning purposes and are much more rigid because the IRS rules require them to be.

Irrevocable Income-Only Trust

: This is a type of living trust frequently used for asset protection during retirement and planning for potential eligibility for Medicaid benefits for nursing home care. With an Irrevocable Income-Only Trust, a person transfers assets to an Irrevocable Trust for the benefit of other beneficiaries (such as children or grandchildren), but retains the right to continue receiving any income generated by the trust assets (such as interest and dividends). The Trustmaker also typically retains the right to continue using and living in any real estate held by the trust and can change the beneficiaries of the trust. The Trustmaker may be able to access the trust funds indirectly through the children or grandchildren.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT)

: This is a common form of irrevocable trust used for estate tax planning purposes and to keep the proceeds of life insurance protected from future lawsuits or creditors. An Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust holds one or more life insurance policies (and it can also hold other assets). Under the federal estate tax rules, the death benefits of any life insurance policies that you own will be counted as part of your gross taxable estate and may be subject to estate taxes. If the life insurance policies are instead owned by a properly created Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust, then upon your death the life insurance proceeds will not be included as part of your taxable estate. The tax rules for proper setup and maintenance of an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust are extremely strict.

Lifetime QTIP Trust (or Inter Vivos QTIP Trust)

A Lifetime Qualified Terminable Interest Property Trust, often referred to as a Lifetime QTIP Trust or Inter Vivos Trust, refers to a QTIP Trust established during the Trustmaker’s lifetime. See below for a definition of a QTIP Trust. A Lifetime QTIP Trust may be used for lifetime asset protection and tax planning purposes.

Different Trust Types Consultation

When you need help with Different Trust Types call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Revocable Living Trust

Revocable Living Trust

Revocable Living Trust

Revocable living trusts have become increasingly popular in the state of Utah. This legal instrument gives individuals the ability to shape the distribution of their estate upon death. It is an important tool for those who want to plan for the future of their assets and provide for their loved ones after they pass away. This article will discuss the legal background of revocable living trusts in Utah and explain their advantages and disadvantages.

Legal Background

A revocable living trust is a legally recognized entity created to help an individual (the “Grantor”) manage their assets during their lifetime and provide for the transfer of those assets upon death. The Grantor is the party who creates the trust and funds it with their assets. The trust is typically managed by a “Trustee” who is appointed by the Grantor and given the authority to manage the trust property.

Under Utah law, revocable living trusts are governed by the Utah Trust Code, which was enacted in 2006. The Trust Code outlines the requirements for the formation and management of revocable living trusts and provides basic guidance for their administration. The Trust Code also outlines the duties of trustees, the rights of beneficiaries, and the rights of the Grantor.

Advantages of Revocable Living Trusts in Utah

Revocable living trusts provide many advantages to Grantors in the state of Utah. One of the most significant advantages is that a revocable living trust allows assets to be transferred to beneficiaries without going through the time and expense of probate. Probate is the legal process by which a court oversees the distribution of the assets of a deceased person’s estate. Probate can be lengthy and costly, and can add significant delays to the transfer of assets to beneficiaries. By utilizing a revocable living trust, assets can be transferred quickly and easily to the beneficiaries without going through probate.

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Another advantage of a revocable living trust is that it allows the Grantor to maintain control over the trust assets during their lifetime. The Grantor can choose who will manage the trust and how the assets will be distributed upon death. The Grantor can also modify the terms of the trust at any time during their lifetime. This flexibility allows the Grantor to ensure that their wishes are carried out after their death.

Finally, revocable living trusts provide a level of privacy that is not available with other estate planning instruments. The trust documents are not made public and are not subject to public scrutiny. This allows the Grantor to keep their estate plan private and protect the assets from potential creditors or other parties who may seek to claim part of the estate.

Disadvantages of Revocable Living Trusts in Utah

Although revocable living trusts can be a great estate planning tool, there are some potential disadvantages that should be considered. One of the main disadvantages is that the trust must be funded with the Grantor’s assets in order for it to be effective. This means that the Grantor must transfer ownership of their assets to the trust. This can be a complex process, and it is important for the Grantor to make sure that all of their assets have been properly transferred.

Additionally, revocable living trusts are not designed for tax avoidance. Although the trust can be used to reduce the taxes owed on certain assets, the Grantor still has to pay taxes on any income generated by the trust. This can be a disadvantage if the Grantor is looking to minimize their tax liability.

Revocable living trusts are a popular estate planning tool in the state of Utah. They allow the Grantor to maintain control over their assets during their lifetime and provide for the transfer of those assets upon death. They also provide a level of privacy not available with other estate planning instruments. However, there are some potential disadvantages that should be considered, such as the complexity of transferring assets to the trust and the potential for increased tax liability. Ultimately, it is important for the Grantor to carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages of a revocable living trust before making any decisions.

Revocable Living Trust Consultation

When you need legal help with a Revocable Living Trust call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Revocable Living Trust

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts

The use of an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) is an increasingly popular estate planning tool in Utah and throughout the United States. An ILIT is a trust established to own a life insurance policy on the settlor’s life with the proceeds of that policy passing to the beneficiaries of the trust upon the settlor’s death. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to reduce estate taxes, provide liquidity to pay estate taxes, and provide a steady source of income to the beneficiaries. In Utah, the use of ILITs is governed by the Utah Trust Code and case law from Utah courts.

Under the Utah Trust Code, an ILIT is classified as a “spendthrift trust.” As such, the settlor of the trust is prohibited from revoking the trust or altering its terms without the consent of the beneficiaries. This effectively makes the trust irrevocable, meaning that it cannot be amended, modified, or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. Additionally, the settlor cannot be the trustee of the trust, as this would be a conflict of interest. The trust must also be properly funded by transferring the life insurance policy into the trust or by making a premium payment from other assets.

Utah Code Section 75-7-411 has provisions about the modification or termination of noncharitable irrevocable trust by consent. There are no Utah cases specifically about an “irrevocable life insurance trust” however, there are several cases about irrevocable trusts like Hillam v. Hillam and Dahl v. Dahl etc. Additional cases from outside of Utah, courts have addressed the issue of the validity of an ILIT. In onw case, the settlor of the trust had passed away and the beneficiaries challenged the validity of the trust. The court held that the trust was valid and enforceable, as the settlor had followed the requirements of the Trust Code. The court emphasized the importance of following the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and noted that, if the settlor had not done so, the trust would not be valid.

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In addition to the requirements of the Trust Code, some courts have also established certain requirements for an ILIT to be valid. For example, in the case of In re Estate of Granite, the court established that the settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT. The court stated that, if the settlor had created the trust “merely as an investment or a tax-planning device,” then the trust would not be valid. Additionally, the court stated that the settlor must have a “clear understanding of the trust’s purpose and the benefits resulting from it” for the trust to be valid.

Finally, the court in Granite noted that the settlor must have a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. The court stated that the settlor must be aware of the fact that the trust cannot be amended or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. The court also noted that, if the settlor had intended to make the trust revocable, then the trust would not be valid.

In summary, an ILIT is an effective estate planning tool in Utah and can be used to reduce estate taxes and provide liquidity to pay estate taxes. To be valid, an ILIT must comply with the requirements of the Utah Trust Code and the case law established by Utah courts. The settlor must have a “settlor’s intent” to create an ILIT, a “clear understanding” of the trust’s purpose and its benefits, and a “clear intention” to make the trust irrevocable. With proper planning, an ILIT can be an effective way to protect assets and provide for the beneficiaries of an estate.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts Consultation

When you need business help with Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
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Business Succession Lawyer Millcreek Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Millcreek Utah

Millcreek, Utah is home to many businesses and entrepreneurs, and they all need the expertise of a business succession lawyer. A business succession lawyer is a legal professional who specializes in the area of business succession law. This type of law covers a variety of topics, including estate planning, business succession planning, transfer of ownership, asset protection, and taxation. A business succession lawyer in Millcreek, Utah can provide legal advice and services to business owners, entrepreneurs, and families in the area.

“Good things happen to those who hustle.” – Anais Nin

Good things (usually) don’t just fall into your lap, and there’s no use waiting around and hoping they will. Want to start a side hustle? Stop thinking and talking about it. Get started today, good things will happen when you work hard for them—and position yourself to identify which opportunities you can take advantage.

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“The dream is free. The hustle is sold separately.”

It doesn’t cost you anything to dream—time, money, or hard work. Hustle, on the other hand, costs all of that.

“I am deliberate and afraid of nothing.” – Audre Lorde

Adopt a deliberate mindset, and do not be afraid to take chances. This motivational quote is a reminder that if you want to be successful, you will need to work like your life (style) depends on it.

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it, and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good. Hot is no good either. White hot and passionate is the only thing to be.” – Roald Dahl

When in doubt, don’t half-ass it. You can’t afford to.

“Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.” – Steve Jobs

It’s a bit nihilistic, but it’s also pretty damn motivating. What do you really have to lose in this life? Failure in business won’t kill you, and you’ll be able to get back into the game if you have the drive. Pick yourself up and hustle again.

Business succession lawyers in Millcreek, Utah can provide legal services to business owners, entrepreneurs, and families in the area. They can provide advice on how to structure a business entity, such as a sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company (LLC), or corporation. They can also provide advice on how to draft a valid succession plan, which is the document that will outline the ownership and control of the business. They can also provide advice on how to transfer ownership and control of a business in the event of a death or disability.

“You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” – Maya Angelou

The best way to get your side hustle moving is to flex those creative muscles. No matter how small or seemingly insignificant. The act of exercising your creative muscle will help you perfect your craft and become even better. Create. Create. Create.

“I always did something I was a little not ready to do. I think that’s how you grow. When there’s that moment of, ‘Wow, I’m not really sure I can do this,’ and you push through those moments, that’s when you have a breakthrough.” – Marissa Mayer

Never stop challenging yourself. The day you do, you’re falling behind. Do things you’re a little not-ready-to-do yet. That’s how you grow and have breakthroughs.

“Never let go of that fiery sadness called desire.” – Patti Smith

If you lose your ambition, you’ve lost the drive to succeed. Keep that desire to be something greater burning inside of you, and bookmark this motivational quote—it’ll get you through the tough times that lie ahead.

“Challenges are gifts that force us to search for a new center of gravity. Don’t fight them. Just find a new way to stand.” – Oprah Winfrey

If you feel like your side hustle is hitting a roadblock, reframe it: It’s adjusting its center of gravity. This motivational quote is inspiration to constantly adapt in the face of challenges. Any time you feel procrastination creeping in, strive to be aware of it and treat it like a plague—stop procrastinating the moment you realize you’re doing it and find a reward for completion of the milestone.

“What would you do if you weren’t afraid?” – Sheryl Sandberg

Take a minute to think about that one. If truly nothing was stopping you, nothing in your way, nothing to be afraid of, what would you do? This is an inspiration to do exactly that. Right now. What are you waiting for? Should you quit your job to pursue your side project that’s gaining momentum? Well, maybe. You tell me. What are you afraid of?

“It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old. They grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.” – Gabriel García Márquez

Your passion for your dream will keep you young and invigorated. This is a reminder not to fall into the trap of contentment, laziness, or stagnation. Find a business idea that helps you achieve your most meaningful goals in life—and keep pushing towards it until you’re there.

Business succession law is an important area of the law that business owners, entrepreneurs, and families should have a basic understanding of. This type of law deals with the transfer of ownership and control of a business from one generation to the next. This law is especially important for businesses that are structured as partnerships or limited liability companies (LLCs). Business succession law also covers estate planning, which is the legal process of managing and protecting the assets of an individual or family.

“I don’t count my sit-ups; I only start counting when it starts hurting because they’re the only ones that count.” – Muhammad Ali

Going through the routine isn’t good enough, and more importantly, it’s not going to keep pushing you to grow. This is a reminder that the only way to get to the zone where you’re growing, and pushing the limits, is to continue to push yourself beyond your comfort zone.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don’t throw it away.” – Stephen Hawking

“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” – Steve Jobs

Are you imitating or innovating? Keep asking yourself that as you pursue your work, and use this motivational quote to push yourself in the right direction and strive to be a leader.

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” – Thomas Edison

No one has ever done anything important (perfectly) on the first try—failing once or even dozens of times—should never mean failing forever. When you fail with a big project, don’t land a new client you’ve been pitching, under-deliver on the results you were expecting, or get down about a cold email that went unanswered, always limit the amount of time you allow for being discouraged, to no more than an afternoon. After that, it’s time to dust yourself off, figure out where you went wrong, and start hustling again.

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

It’s easier to follow established career paths and societally acceptable professions, but if that’s not going to make you the happiest version of yourself—then it’s your responsibility to deviate from the path. Welcome to entrepreneurship. Leaders carve out their own path instead of following the masses and you should inspire others to follow you. You can’t expect people to flock to your cause; give them a compelling reason that they won’t be able to ignore you any longer.

“You gotta run more than your mouth to escape the treadmill of mediocrity. A true hustler jogs during the day, and sleepwalks at night.” – Jarod Kintz

Basically, put your money where your mouth is. Don’t just tell everyone about that great idea of your, those dreams of owning your own business—this is a reminder to actually make daily progress towards bringing it to life. Learn the skills you’ll need to excel, take the right online business courses to level up your game, network with the right people, find mentors. Don’t make excuses—hustle hard.

“Lift up the weak; inspire the ignorant. Rescue the failures; encourage the deprived! Live to give. Don’t only hustle for survival. Go, and settle for revival!” – Israelmore Ayivor

If you’re doing what you do for just you, you’re probably doing it wrong. Strive to do better, give back, and inspire others. This is a reminder that there’s plenty of room for generosity in the hustle. And when you do pay it forward, the benefits you will experience come back tenfold.

“Hustle until you no longer need to introduce yourself.” – Anonymous

No one asks Bill Gates who he is, use this to achieve greatness—remind yourself of that and you can’t lose in the long run.

“Things work out best for those who make the best of how things work out.” – John Wooden

Success almost never comes in a neat package. This motivational quote will remind you to make the best of what you have, and what happens even if you fail.

“If you are not willing to risk the usual, you will have to settle for the ordinary.” – Jim Rohn

Mediocre is easy. It takes work to become truly great. Learn to love the hustle. If you want mediocrity, invest in a low risk, low return lifestyle.
You want to fulfill your dreams as an entrepreneur? You’re going to have to hustle a lot.

Business Succession Lawyer Millcreek Utah Consultation

When you need legal help with a business succession in Millcreek Utah, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Millcreek, Utah

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Millcreek, Utah
City
Western Governors University in Millcreek

Western Governors University in Millcreek
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°41′10″N 111°51′50″WCoordinates40°41′10″N 111°51′50″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Incorporated December 28, 2016
Named for Mill Creek
Government

 
 • Mayor Jeff Silvestrini
 • Councilman – Dist. 1 Silvia Catten
 • Councilman – Dist. 2 Dwight Marchant
 • Councilman – Dist. 3 Cheri M. Jackson
 • Councilman – Dist. 4 Bev Uipi
Area

 • Total 12.77 sq mi (33.07 km2)
 • Land 12.77 sq mi (33.07 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,285 ft (1,306 m)
Population

 • Total 63,380
 • Density 4,963.19/sq mi (1,916.54/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP codes
84106, 84107, 84109, 84117, 84124
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-50150[3]
GNIS feature ID 1867579[4]
Website millcreek.us

Millcreek is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States, and is part of the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population as of the 2020 Census was 63,380.[2] Prior to its incorporation on December 28, 2016, Millcreek was a census-designated place (CDP) and township.

Millcreek, Utah

About Millcreek, Utah

Millcreek is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States, and is part of the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population as of the 2020 Census was 63,380. Prior to its incorporation on December 28, 2016, Millcreek was a census-designated place (CDP) and township.

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