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Business Exit Strategy

Business Exit Strategy

“Grow Your Business with a Proven Exist Strategy”

Introduction

Business exit strategy is an important part of any business plan. It is the plan for how a business owner will exit the business when the time comes. It is important to have an exit strategy in place to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate and grow even after the owner has left. An exit strategy can include selling the business, transferring ownership, or liquidating assets. It is important to consider all of these options when creating an exit strategy. This article will discuss the importance of having an exit strategy, the different types of exit strategies, and how to create an effective exit strategy.

How to Develop a Comprehensive Business Exit Strategy

Developing a comprehensive business exit strategy is an important part of any business plan. It is essential to have a plan in place to ensure that the business is able to transition smoothly and successfully when the time comes to move on. Here are some tips for developing a comprehensive business exit strategy.

1. Establish a timeline. It is important to have a timeline in place for when the business will be transitioned. This timeline should include when the business will be sold, when the assets will be transferred, and when the business will be officially closed.

2. Identify potential buyers. It is important to identify potential buyers for the business. This could include family members, friends, or other businesses. It is important to research potential buyers to ensure that they are a good fit for the business.

3. Develop a transition plan. Once potential buyers have been identified, it is important to develop a transition plan. This plan should include how the assets will be transferred, how the business will be closed, and how the new owners will be trained.

4. Create a financial plan. It is important to create a financial plan for the transition. This plan should include how the business will be funded, how the assets will be transferred, and how the proceeds from the sale will be distributed.

5. Develop a marketing plan. It is important to develop a marketing plan to ensure that the business is properly promoted to potential buyers. This plan should include how the business will be advertised, how potential buyers will be contacted, and how the sale will be finalized.

6. Prepare legal documents. It is important to prepare all necessary legal documents for the transition. This includes contracts, deeds, and other documents that will be needed to transfer the business.

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By following these steps, business owners can develop a comprehensive business exit strategy that will ensure a smooth transition when the time comes to move on.

The Benefits of Having a Business Exit Strategy

Having a business exit strategy is an important part of any business plan. An exit strategy is a plan for how a business owner will transition out of their business when the time comes. It is important to have an exit strategy in place to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate and grow even after the owner has left.

The first benefit of having an exit strategy is that it provides a clear plan for the future of the business. An exit strategy outlines the steps that need to be taken to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate and grow even after the owner has left. This plan can include details such as who will take over the business, how the transition will be handled, and what will happen to the assets of the business. Having a clear plan in place can help to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate and grow even after the owner has left.

The second benefit of having an exit strategy is that it can help to protect the business owner’s personal assets. An exit strategy can help to ensure that the business owner’s personal assets are not tied up in the business. This can help to protect the business owner’s personal assets from any potential liabilities that may arise from the business.

The third benefit of having an exit strategy is that it can help to maximize the value of the business. An exit strategy can help to ensure that the business is able to be sold for the highest possible price. This can help to ensure that the business owner is able to receive the maximum return on their investment.

Having an exit strategy is an important part of any business plan. An exit strategy can help to ensure that the business is able to continue to operate and grow even after the owner has left. It can also help to protect the business owner’s personal assets and maximize the value of the business. Having an exit strategy in place can help to ensure that the business is able to continue to be successful even after the owner has left.

Understanding the Different Types of Business Exit Strategies

Business exit strategies are important for any business owner to consider. They provide a way to transition out of a business and maximize the return on investment. There are several different types of exit strategies, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Understanding the different types of exit strategies can help business owners make the best decision for their situation.

The first type of exit strategy is a sale. This involves selling the business to another party, either an individual or a company. This is often the most profitable option, as it allows the business owner to receive a lump sum payment for the business. However, it can also be the most difficult to achieve, as it requires finding a buyer who is willing to pay the desired price.

The second type of exit strategy is a merger or acquisition. This involves combining the business with another company, either through a merger or an acquisition. This can be a good option for businesses that are struggling financially, as it allows them to benefit from the resources and expertise of the larger company. However, it can also be difficult to achieve, as it requires finding a suitable partner.

The third type of exit strategy is a liquidation. This involves selling off the assets of the business and using the proceeds to pay off any outstanding debts. This is often the least profitable option, as it does not provide any return on investment. However, it can be the quickest and easiest way to transition out of a business.

The fourth type of exit strategy is a management buyout. This involves the current management team of the business buying out the owners. This can be a good option for businesses that are doing well, as it allows the current management team to continue running the business. However, it can also be difficult to achieve, as it requires finding a suitable buyer.

Finally, the fifth type of exit strategy is a family succession. This involves passing the business down to a family member or members. This can be a good option for businesses that have been in the family for generations, as it allows the business to remain in the family. However, it can also be difficult to achieve, as it requires finding a suitable successor.

Understanding the different types of exit strategies can help business owners make the best decision for their situation. Each option has its own advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to consider all of them before making a decision. With the right strategy, business owners can maximize their return on investment and transition out of their business in the most profitable way possible.

How to Prepare Your Business for a Successful Exit

Exiting a business is a major milestone for any entrepreneur. It is important to plan ahead and prepare your business for a successful exit. Here are some tips to help you get started:

1. Develop a Strategic Plan: A strategic plan will help you identify your goals and objectives for the business and create a roadmap for achieving them. It should include a timeline for when you plan to exit, as well as a plan for transitioning the business to new ownership.

2. Evaluate Your Business: Take a close look at your business and assess its strengths and weaknesses. This will help you identify areas that need improvement and determine the best way to maximize the value of your business.

3. Prepare Your Financials: Make sure your financials are up-to-date and accurate. This will help potential buyers understand the financial health of your business and make it easier for them to make an informed decision.

4. Identify Potential Buyers: Research potential buyers and determine which ones are the best fit for your business. Consider factors such as their financial resources, industry experience, and strategic vision.

5. Negotiate the Sale: Once you have identified a potential buyer, it is important to negotiate the sale in a way that is beneficial to both parties. Make sure to consider all aspects of the sale, including the purchase price, terms of the sale, and any contingencies.

By following these tips, you can ensure that your business is prepared for a successful exit. With the right planning and preparation, you can maximize the value of your business and ensure a smooth transition to new ownership.

The Role of Tax Planning in Business Exit Strategies

Tax planning is an important component of any business exit strategy. It is essential for business owners to understand the tax implications of their exit strategy and to plan accordingly.

When exiting a business, the owner must consider the tax implications of the sale of the business, the distribution of assets, and the transfer of ownership. Depending on the structure of the business, the owner may be subject to capital gains taxes, income taxes, and other taxes. It is important to understand the tax implications of each option and to plan accordingly.

Tax planning can help business owners minimize their tax liability and maximize their profits. For example, if the owner is selling the business, they may be able to structure the sale in a way that minimizes their capital gains taxes. They may also be able to take advantage of tax credits or deductions that can reduce their tax liability.

Tax planning can also help business owners maximize the value of their assets. For example, if the owner is transferring ownership of the business to a family member, they may be able to structure the transfer in a way that minimizes the tax burden on the recipient. They may also be able to take advantage of tax incentives or deductions that can increase the value of the assets.

Finally, tax planning can help business owners plan for their retirement. For example, if the owner is planning to retire, they may be able to structure their retirement plan in a way that minimizes their tax liability. They may also be able to take advantage of tax incentives or deductions that can increase their retirement savings.

Tax planning is an important component of any business exit strategy. It is essential for business owners to understand the tax implications of their exit strategy and to plan accordingly. By taking the time to understand the tax implications of their exit strategy and to plan accordingly, business owners can minimize their tax liability and maximize their profits.

Q&A

Q1: What is a business exit strategy?
A1: A business exit strategy is a plan for transitioning out of a business, either through sale, closure, or transfer of ownership. It outlines the steps to be taken to ensure the successful transition of the business and its assets.

Q2: Why is a business exit strategy important?
A2: A business exit strategy is important because it helps to ensure that the business is prepared for the transition and that the owners are able to maximize the value of the business. It also helps to protect the owners from potential legal and financial liabilities.

Q3: What are the different types of business exit strategies?
A3: The different types of business exit strategies include sale of the business, closure of the business, transfer of ownership, and succession planning.

Q4: What should be included in a business exit strategy?
A4: A business exit strategy should include an assessment of the current state of the business, a timeline for the transition, a plan for the transfer of ownership, and a plan for the distribution of assets.

Q5: How can a business exit strategy be implemented?
A5: A business exit strategy can be implemented by creating a timeline for the transition, setting up a plan for the transfer of ownership, and creating a plan for the distribution of assets. Additionally, it is important to consult with legal and financial advisors to ensure that the transition is done properly.

Business Exit Strategy Consultation

When you need help with a Business Exit Strategy call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Business succession planning is an important part of the overall financial planning process for many business owners, especially those who own family businesses. A business succession plan is a document that outlines the steps to be taken in order to transfer ownership of a business to the next generation. It also provides a framework for addressing the financial needs of the business owners and their families, as well as the succession of the business itself.

Business succession planning should include an analysis of the business’s current value, and an assessment of the business owners’ financial needs, including estate taxes and other liabilities. Business owners should also consider potential candidates for ownership, including family members, key employees, and outside parties. Many business owners opt for a buy-sell agreement, which is a legal agreement between business owners and potential buyers to purchase the business interest in the event of the death or disability of a business owner.

In addition to buy-sell agreements, small business owners should also consider financial life insurance as a part of their succession planning. A life insurance policy can be used to fund the purchase of a business interest from a deceased or disabled business owner. The proceeds from such a life insurance policy can help to ensure that the business continues to thrive, and that the next generation of the family business is able to take over.

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For larger businesses, succession planning may also involve the use of member firms or key employees to ensure continuity of operations. It is important that the business owner carefully assess potential candidates for ownership, as well as the potential impact of their selection on the business’s value.

Business succession planning is an important part of the financial planning process for many business owners, especially those who own family businesses. By creating a comprehensive succession plan, business owners can ensure that their businesses are able to continue to thrive for generations to come. Furthermore, by implementing buy/sell agreements and life insurance policies, business owners can ensure that the financial needs of their families and the business itself are taken care of in the event of their death or disability.

Business Succession Planning

Business succession planning is the process in which long-term needs are identified and addressed. The main concern in succession planning is in providing for the continuation of business operations in the event that the owner or manager retires or suddenly becomes incapacitated or deceased. This can occur by several means, such as transferring leadership to the following generation of family members or by naming a specific person to become the next owner. It is highly advantageous to have a business succession plan. Such a plan can create several benefits for the business, including tax breaks and no gaps in business operations. The plan will be formally recorded in a document, which is usually drafted by an attorney. A business succession plan is similar to a contract in that it has binding effect on the parties who sign the document and consent to the plan. Therefore, the main advantage of having a succession plan is that the organization will be much better prepared to handle any unforeseen circumstances in the future. A well thought out succession plan will be both very broad in scope and specific in detailed instruction. It should include many provisions to address other concerns besides the issue of who will take over ownership.

A business succession plan should include:

• Approximate dates or time frames when succession will begin. For example, the projected date of the owner’s retirement. Instructions should also be composed for steps to take as the date approaches.

• Provisions for what should occur in case of the owner’s unexpected incapacitation, such as in the event of severe illness or death. A replacement should be named in these provisions, and you should state how long their responsibilities will last (i.e., permanent or temporary).

• Identification of who will be the next successor or a guideline for how election should occur, and instructions to ensure a smooth transition.

• A strategic plan for the business after the succession has taken place. This should include any new revisions to current policies and management structures.
As you might expect, there are many legal matters to be addressed when creating a succession plan. Some common issues that arise in connection with business succession include:

• Choice of successor: If the succession plan does not clearly name a successor, it can lead to disputes, especially amongst family members who may be inheriting the business. Be sure to state exactly who will take charge.

• Property distribution: If there is any property in the previous owner’s name, this will need to be addressed so that the property can be distributed upon or during transition.

• Type of business form: Every type of business has different requirements regarding succession. For example, if the business is a corporation, the previous owner’s name must be removed from the articles of incorporation and replaced with that of the successor’s name. On the other hand, partnerships will usually dissolve upon the death of a partner, and it must be re-formed unless specific provisions are made in a contract.

• Tax issues: Any outstanding taxes, debts, or unfinished business must be resolved. Also, if the owner has died, there may be issues with death taxes.

• Benefits: You should ask whether the business will continue to provide benefits even after the owner has retired. For example, health care, life insurance, and retirement pay must be addressed.

• Employment contracts: If there are any ongoing employment contracts, these must be honored so as to avoid an employment law disputes. For example, if there is going to be a change in management structure, it must take into account any provisions contained in the employees’ contracts.

Picking the Successor

When creating the business succession plan, it is crucial that the person that succeeds the current owner is able to continue the company successfully. Without this ability, many individuals may be crossed off the list. Otherwise, it is just easier to sell the organization to someone that the owner has not invested interest in, and the continued transactions and revenue mean nothing personal. One of the primary reasons to have a business succession plan is to ensure the company continues functioning after the owner either enters retirement or dies. For the successor to be a family member, he or she must be fully prepared to work hard and invest time and energy into the business. Many owners of a business have multiple family members or assistants that could take his or her place. It is important to assess both the strengths and weaknesses of each individual so he or she is able to choose the person best suited for the position. There could be resentment and negative emotions that affect the arrangement with other members of the family, and this must be taken into account along with keeping other relationships from becoming complicated such as a spouse or the manager of the business who may have assumed he or she would take on the ownership or full run of the company.

Finalizing the Process

While some may sell the company before retiring or death, it is still important to determine the value of the business before the plan is finalized. This means an appraisal and documentation with the successor’s name and information. Additional items may need to be purchased such as life insurance, liability coverage and various files with the transfer of ownership if the owner is ready to conclude the proceedings. The current owner may also be provided monetary compensation for his or her interest or a monthly stipend based on the profits of the company. These matters are determined by the paperwork and possession of the business. The transfer may be possible through a cross-purchase agreement where each party has a policy on the partners in the business. Each person is both owner and beneficiary simultaneously. This permits a buyout of shares or interest when one partner dies if necessary. An entity purchase occurs with the policy being both beneficiary and owner. Then the shares are transferred to the company upon the death of one person. Succession plans are commonly associated with retirement; however, they serve an important function earlier in the business lifespan: If anything unexpected happens to you or a co-owner, a succession plan can help reduce headaches, drama, and monetary loss. As the complexity of the business and the number of people impacted by the exit grows, so does the need for a well-written succession plan.
You should consider creating successions plan if you:

• Have complex processes: How will your employees and successor know how to operate the business once you exit? How will you duplicate your subject matter expertise?

• Employ more than just yourself: Who will step in to lead employees, administer human resources (HR) and payroll, and choose a successor and leadership structure?

• Have repeat clients and ongoing contracts: Where will clients go after your exit, and who will maintain relationships and deliver on long-term contracts?

• Have a successor in mind: How did you arrive at this decision, and are they aware and willing to take ownership?

When to Create a Small Business Succession Plan

Every business needs a succession plan to ensure that operations continue, and clients don’t experience a disruption in service. If you don’t already have a succession plan in place for your small business, this is something you should put together as soon as possible. While you may not plan to leave your business, unplanned exits do happen. In general, the closer a business owner gets to retirement age, the more urgent the need for a plan. Business owners should write a succession plan when a transfer of ownership is in sight, including when they intend to list their business for sale, retire, or transfer ownership of the business. This will ensure the business operates smoothly throughout the transition. There are several scenarios in which a business can change ownership. The type of succession plan you create may depend on a specific scenario. You may also wish to create a succession plan that addresses the unexpected, such as illness, accident, or death, in which case you should consider whether to include more than one potential successor.

Selling Your Business to a Co-owner

If you founded your business with a partner or partners, you may be considering your co-owners as potential successors. Many partnerships draft a mutual agreement that, in the event of one owner’s untimely death or disability, the remaining owners will agree to purchase their business interests from their next of kin. This type of agreement can help ease the burden of an unexpected transition—for the business and family members alike. A spouse might be interested in keeping their shares but may not have the time investment or experience to help it blossom. A buy-sell agreement ensures they’re given fair compensation, and allows the remaining co-owners to maintain control of the business.

Passing Your Business Onto an Heir

Choosing an heir as your successor is a popular option for business owners, especially those with children or family members working in their organization. It is regarded as an attractive option for providing for your family by handing them the reins to a successful, fully operational enterprise. Passing your business on to an heir is not without its complications. Some steps you can take to pass your business onto an heir smoothly are:

• Determine who will take over: This is an easy decision if you already have a single-family member involved in the business but gets more complicated when multiple family members are interested in taking over.

• Provide clear instructions: Include instructions on who will take over and how other heirs will be compensated.

• Consider a buy-sell agreement: Many succession plans include a buy-sell agreement that allows heirs that are not active in the business to sell their shares to those who are.

• Determine future leadership structure: In businesses where many heirs are involved, and only one will take over, you can simplify future discussions by providing clear instructions on how the structure should look moving forward.

Selling Your Business to a Key Employee

When you don’t have a co-owner or family member to entrust with your business, a key employee might be the right successor. Consider employees who are experienced, business-savvy, and respected by your staff, which can ease the transition. Your org chart can help with this. If you’re concerned about maintaining quality after your departure, a key employee is generally more reliable than an outside buyer. Just like selling to a co-owner, a key employee succession plan requires a buy-sell agreement. Your employee will agree to purchase your business at a predetermined retirement date, or in the event of death, disability, or other circumstance that renders you unable to manage the business.

Selling Your Business to an Outside Party

When there isn’t an obvious successor to take over, business owners may look to the community: Is there another entrepreneur, or even a competitor, that would purchase your business? To ensure that the business is sold for the proper amount, you will want to calculate the business value properly, and that the valuation is updated frequently. This is easier for some types of businesses than others. If you own a more turnkey operation, like a restaurant with a good general manager, your task is simply to demonstrate that it’s a good investment. They won’t have to get their hands dirty unless they want to and will ideally still have time to focus on their other business interests. Meanwhile, if you own a real estate company that’s branded under your own name, selling could potentially be more challenging. Buyers will recognize the need to rebrand and remarket and, as a result, may not be willing to pay full price. Instead, you should prepare your business for sale well in advance; hire and train a great general manager, formalize your operating procedures, and get all your finances in check. Make your business as stable and turnkey as possible, so it’s more attractive and valuable to outside buyers.

Selling Your Shares Back to the Company

The fifth option is available to businesses with multiple owners. An “entity purchase plan” or a “stock redemption plan” is an arrangement where the business purchases life insurance on each of the co-owners. When one owner dies, the business uses the life insurance proceeds to purchase the business interest from the deceased owner’s estate, thus giving each surviving owners a larger share of the business.

Reasons to Hire a Business Succession Attorney

• Decisions during the Idea Stage: Even before you officially open your doors for business, you have several decisions to make that will affect your daily operations going forward. What will you call your company? Is the name you have in mind available? What is your marketing tag line? Can you use that without encountering any problems? Where will your business be located? Are there any zoning issues of which you need to be aware? These are just a few examples of decisions that need to be made before you even start doing what it is you want to do. These decisions will be a lot easier to make with the help of a business attorney.

• Startup Protocols and Legal Requirements: Another early decision you’re going to have to make involves the specific type of business entity you want to initiate. You need to do so for several reasons, not the least of which is that most types of business entities require some sort of registration and all businesses will need to register and obtain a business license from the local municipalities in which they operate. In addition, you may need to provide public notice of the intention of starting a business entity, which could involve publishing that notice in a newspaper for four weeks. You need to do this right or you could face other problems, which is another reason why hiring a lawyer for your business startup is a wise decision.

• Banking Questions: If you’re going to start a business, you’re also going to need to open a bank account or perhaps multiple bank accounts. You may also need to apply for credit in the forms of credit cards and/or lines of credit if attainable. It’s highly advisable for a plethora of reasons to keep all of your business finances completely separate from your personal situation, as it’ll be much easier to organize those separate forms of finances come tax time or should any other questions arise. A small business attorney can help you choose the proper bank and the type of account or accounts you should look to open so you don’t wind up scrambling after you begin your core mission.

• Tax Questions: Since the founding of our country, a common quote that people tend to repeat in several contexts is, “Nothing is certain except for death and taxes.” What is not debatable is that your business will be taxed in one way or another, and you need a lawyer for your business startup to make sure that you’re both in compliance with local, state and federal tax codes and so that you’re not unnecessarily facing double taxes. Tax questions should be answered before you get started so you know what to generally expect in this regard, and from there you should work with a tax accountant for your specific tax questions.

• Insurance Questions: One of the issues that you’ll begin to hear and think more about as you get ready to start your business involves liability. You are responsible for the product or service you provide to your clients or customers, and you want to make sure that you’re protected from personal liability should something go wrong. You may also need to comply with regulations that require some sort of liability insurance coverage, but choosing the proper coverage and understanding the nature of that coverage are involved tasks that need to be done right. A small business attorney can help guide your business towards the coverage you need while simultaneously helping you minimize the chance for unexpected and unpleasant surprises down the road.

• Debt Management: For most Americans, debt is simply a part of life. For the majority of small business owners, debt is something that exists even before they open their doors. Debt is real and it doesn’t go away easily, and like anything else, questions, confusion and problems relating to debt can arise that can harm your ability to push your organization forward. The best way to manage debt issues is by way of advice from a business attorney who can explain the legalities involved with it and fight for you if there is a problem.

• Dispute Advocacy: It’s common for any business to encounter disputes of one type or another. It’s also unfortunately common for a startup business to wind up dealing with a problem with a vendor or some larger, more established entity. Regardless, owners need a small business attorney at the ready to fight for their company when such situations arise. An attorney who isn’t going to hesitate to advocate zealously for clients can level the playing field and even help resolve issues before they become much larger problems. In some cases, even mentioning that you have an attorney representing you could help avoid those problems altogether.

Logan Utah Business Succession Lawyer Consultation

When you need legal help from an attorney to help with a business succession, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Logan, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
Logan, Utah
City
Downtown Logan, with courthouse

Downtown Logan, with courthouse
Motto: 

“United in Service”
Location in Cache County and the state of Utah

Location in Cache County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 41°44′16″N 111°49′51″WCoordinates41°44′16″N 111°49′51″W
Country  United States
State  Utah
County Cache
Founded 1859
Incorporated January 17, 1866
Named for Ephraim Logan[1]
Government

 
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Holly H. Daines[2]
Area

 
 • Total 18.43 sq mi (47.74 km2)
 • Land 17.84 sq mi (46.22 km2)
 • Water 0.59 sq mi (1.52 km2)
Elevation

4,534 ft (1,382 m)
Population

 • Total 52,778
 • Density 2,957.5/sq mi (1,141.89/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP Codes
84321-84323, 84341
Area code 435
FIPS code 49-45860
GNIS ID 1442849[3]
Website www.loganutah.org

Logan is a city in Cache CountyUtah, United States. The 2020 census recorded the population was 52,778.[4][5] Logan is the county seat of Cache County[6] and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census[7][8] and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years.[9] Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

Logan, Utah

About Logan, Utah

Logan is a city in Cache County, Utah, United States. The 2020 census recorded the population was 52,778. Logan is the county seat of Cache County and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years. Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

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Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

Business succession is a process of transferring ownership and control of a business from one owner to another. It is important for businesses to have a succession plan in place, as it ensures continuity and a secure future for the business.

Succession planning begins with identifying and assessing potential successors. This involves looking at both internal and external candidates, and assessing their aptitude, skills, and experience to determine if they are suitable for the role. The business will also need to assess the financial implications of the succession.

Once a successor has been chosen, the business will need to develop a detailed plan for the transition. This includes outlining the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the successor, and creating a timeline for the transfer of ownership.

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In addition to the succession plan, the business will need to assess its legal and tax implications. This includes setting up a trust fund or other legal entity to hold the business assets, and ensuring that all taxes are paid.

The business will also need to consider the impact of the succession on its employees, customers, and stakeholders. This includes communicating the succession plan to those who will be affected, and putting measures in place to ensure that the transition is as smooth as possible.

Business succession is a complex process, but can be managed successfully with the right planning and preparation. A well-thought out succession plan will ensure that the business is in good hands, and will ensure its future success.

Business Succession Planning in Herriman Utah

Planning: Developing a comprehensive succession plan that takes into account the future needs of the business and its stakeholders. Planning is an essential part of any business succession, as it helps ensure that the transition of ownership, leadership, and management of the business is smooth and successful. Without proper planning, a business may face a number of challenges that can compromise its future sustainability, growth, and profitability.

At the outset, business owners should create a succession plan that clearly defines the ownership structure, the roles and responsibilities of each stakeholder, and the ownership and management transfer process. This plan should be regularly reviewed and updated to reflect any changes in the business’s structure, personnel, or operations. The plan should also consider the tax implications and legal requirements of the transfer.

Aside from ownership and management transfer, businesses should also plan for the financial needs of the business succession. A succession plan should include a detailed budget that considers the costs associated with the transfer of ownership, such as legal and accounting fees, transfer taxes, and other expenses. It should also include an analysis of the business’s current financial state and projections for future growth.

Business owners should also evaluate the succession plan’s effect on the business’s customer base, employees, and suppliers, as well as create a plan to ensure the effective communication of the transition to these stakeholders. Creating a smooth transition plan will help maintain customer trust and loyalty, as well as ensure that employees, suppliers, and other stakeholders are informed of the changes.

Finally, the business should have a plan for the future. This plan should include a vision for the future of the business, as well as strategies for achieving its desired objectives. It should also include an assessment of potential risks and an examination of the business’s competitive position in the industry.

Business succession planning is a complex process that requires careful consideration and strategic planning. By taking the time to create a comprehensive succession plan, business owners can ensure that their business is well-positioned for long-term success.

Financing a Business Succession

Financing: Securing the necessary funds to finance the succession. Financing is an essential part of business succession. It is the key to ensuring that the transition from one generation of business owners to the next is successful. Without proper financing, a business is likely to suffer from a lack of capital and liquidity, leading to decreased profits and a weakened competitive position in the marketplace. Financing also helps to ensure that the new ownership has the necessary resources to adequately manage the business and maintain a healthy financial position.

Financing gives business owners the ability to purchase assets that are necessary to the business’s success, such as new equipment, technology, and other resources. It also allows them to have access to working capital that can be used to hire additional personnel, purchase inventory, and make necessary investments in the business. For businesses that are transitioning from one generation of ownership to the next, financing can help to ensure that the successor has the necessary funds to continue operations.

Financing can also be used to help pay for the costs associated with business succession. These costs include settling any debts or obligations that are still owed to the prior generation of owners, as well as providing the necessary funds for the next generation of owners to purchase the business. Without proper financing, the new owners may not have the necessary resources to make the transition successful.

Financing is also important for providing the necessary capital to support the growth of the business. This includes providing the necessary funds to invest in new products or services, to expand into different markets, or to acquire additional resources. Without adequate financing, these types of investments may not be possible, leading to stagnation or even the failure of the business.

Finally, financing is essential to helping ensure that the new ownership can sustain the business in the long-term. This includes providing funds for the purchase of long-term assets, such as real estate, and for the development of new products or services. Without long-term financing, the business may not be able to compete effectively in the long run.

Transfer of Assets In Successions

The transfer of assets during business succession is a complex process that must be carefully planned and executed. Assets may include the business itself, real estate, investments, bank accounts, and intellectual property. Depending on the business structure, the transfer of assets may require the use of a corporate or legal entity such as an LLC, partnership, or corporation.

The transfer of assets begins with the business owner or their designated representative assessing the value of the assets. This includes determining the fair market value of each asset and making sure that all assets are properly documented. Once the value is determined, the business owner or their representative will need to decide how to transfer the assets. This could include a sale of the business, gifting of assets, or establishing a trust.

If the transfer is to be done through a sale, the business owner or their representative will need to create a sales agreement in which the buyer agrees to the terms of the sale. This agreement should include the price to be paid, the date the transfer will be completed, and the method of payment. To finalize the sale, the buyer and seller will need to register the transfer of assets with the appropriate governmental agencies.

If the transfer is being done through gifting, the business owner or their representative will need to create a gifting agreement in which the recipient agrees to the terms of the gift. This agreement should include the value of the gift, the date the transfer will be completed, and any restrictions or requirements the recipient must abide by. The agreement must also be registered with the appropriate governmental agencies.

Finally, if the transfer is being done through a trust, the business owner or their representative will need to create a trust agreement. This agreement should include the terms of the trust, such as who the beneficiary is, the type of trust being established, and the date the transfer will be completed. Depending on the type of trust, the trust agreement may need to be registered with the appropriate governmental agency.

Overall, the transfer of assets during business succession is a complex process that requires careful planning and execution. By understanding the value of the assets, the method of transfer, and the necessary paperwork, the business owner or their representative can ensure that the transfer of assets is done properly and that the business is passed on to the intended recipient.

Business Succession Transition Management

Transition Management: Ensuring a smooth transition from the current owner to the successor. Transition management is an important part of business succession planning. It is the process of successfully transferring the ownership, management and operations of a business from one generation to the next. It is a complex process that involves understanding the business, its goals and objectives, the current leadership and management structure, the transfer of ownership, and the transition of control of the business from the current owners to the next generation.

Transition management requires a thorough understanding of the current state of the business and its environment, as well as a plan for the future. The current owners must have a clear understanding of their role in the transition and what they will be leaving behind. This includes an understanding of the current financial state of the business, the current organizational structure, the current legal structure, the current markets, the current customers, and the current competition.

The business succession plan should also include a strategy for the future of the business. This plan should include an analysis of the current business environment, the future markets and customers, the legal requirements for transitioning the business, the financial implications of the transition, and the strategy for transferring ownership, management and operations of the business.

The transition management process also involves the selection of a new owner and the negotiation of a transfer agreement. This agreement should include the transfer of ownership, the transfer of management and operations, the terms of the transfer, and the terms of the agreement. It should also include provisions for the payment of taxes, the transfer of assets, the transfer of liabilities, and the transfers of intellectual property rights.

It is important for the current owners to develop a clear understanding of the transition process and to ensure that all legal and financial requirements are met. It is also important to ensure that the transition is smooth and successful. By taking the time to plan and prepare for the transition, the current owners can ensure that the future of the business is secure and successful.

Support From Your Business Succession Lawyer in Herriman Utah

Support: Providing the necessary advice, guidance and support to ensure the success of the succession. Business succession is an important part of any business, particularly when a business is passed from one generation to the next. It involves a complex process of transferring ownership, assets, and liabilities from one generation to the next. It is a critical process that can have significant implications for the future of the business, as well as the future of the family. As such, it is important to ensure that the succession process is managed properly, and with the utmost care.

One of the most important aspects of a successful business succession is the involvement of a lawyer. A lawyer can provide valuable insight into the legal and financial aspects of the process, and can ensure that the transition is conducted in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. A lawyer can also provide guidance in the development of an estate plan, which is essential for protecting the family’s assets and minimizing taxes. A lawyer can help to ensure that the transfer of ownership is done in an orderly and efficient manner, and in accordance with the wishes of the family.

In addition, a lawyer can provide advice on the structure of the business and the best way to transfer ownership and assets. A lawyer can also provide advice on the proper way to handle any disputes that may arise during the succession process. Furthermore, a lawyer can provide guidance on any tax implications associated with the succession, and can help to ensure that all required documents are properly prepared and filed.

Finally, a lawyer can provide invaluable advice and guidance throughout the entire succession process. This can help to ensure that the transition is smooth and successful, and that the family’s interests are adequately protected. Without the assistance of a lawyer, it is much more likely that the process will be complicated and potentially costly.

In conclusion, the support of a lawyer is essential as part of a business succession. A lawyer can provide invaluable guidance and advice throughout the entire process, and can help to ensure that the succession is conducted in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. Through the assistance of a lawyer, the succession process can be completed quickly and efficiently, and the family’s interests can be adequately protected.

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah Consultation

When you need legal help from a Business Succession Lawyer in Herrimann Utah, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Herriman, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Herriman, Utah
Unified Fire Authority Station 103, located on Main Street

Unified Fire Authority Station 103, located on Main Street
Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°30′24″N 112°1′51″WCoordinates40°30′24″N 112°1′51″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Settled 1851
Incorporated 1999
Became a city April 19, 2001
Founded by Thomas Butterfield
Named for Henry Harriman
Government

 
 • Type Mayor-Council
 • Mayor Lorin Palmer[2]
Area

 • Total 21.63 sq mi (56.03 km2)
 • Land 21.63 sq mi (56.03 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
5,000 ft (1,524 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 55,144[1]
 • Density 2,549.42/sq mi (984.19/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST) UTC-6 (Mountain)
ZIP code
84096
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-34970[4]
GNIS feature ID 1428675[5]
Website http://www.herriman.org

Herriman (/ˈhɛrɪmən/ HERR-ih-mən) is a city in southwestern Salt Lake CountyUtah. The population was 55,144 as of the 2020 census.[1] Although Herriman was a town in 2000,[4] it has since been classified as a fourth-class city by state law.[6] The city has experienced rapid growth since incorporation in 1999, as its population was just 1,523 at the 2000 census.[7] It grew from being the 111th-largest incorporated place in Utah in 2000 to the 14th-largest in 2020.

Herriman, Utah

About Herriman, Utah

Herriman is a city in southwestern Salt Lake County, Utah. The population was 55,144 as of the 2020 census. Although Herriman was a town in 2000, it has since been classified as a fourth-class city by state law. The city has experienced rapid growth since incorporation in 1999, as its population was just 1,523 at the 2000 census. It grew from being the 111th-largest incorporated place in Utah in 2000 to the 14th-largest in 2020.

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Reviews for Jeremy Eveland Herriman, Utah

Business Succession Law

Business Succession Law

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Business Succession Law

Business Succession Law is a complex and important area in the legal landscape. It involves planning for the future of a business, from the transfer of ownership and control to the division of assets and liabilities. It is essential for business owners, family members, and other stakeholders to understand the legal rules, regulations, and issues associated with business succession in order to ensure the continuity of the business and the protection of the owners’ interests. Business Succession Law is a subset of Business Law.

Black’s Law Dictionary, Seventh Edition, Page 1162, defines succession as: “The act or right of legally or officially taking over a predecessor’s office, rank, or duties. 2. The acquisition of rights or property by inheritance under the laws of descent and distribution.” (Abridged Edition, West Group, 2000). Succession is also defined in law as “(1) the act or right of legally or officially coming into a predecessor’s office, rank, or functions: (2) the acquiring of an intestate share of an estate; or (3) loosely, the acquiring of property by will.” from Garner’s Dictionary of Legal Usage, Third Edition, p. 859, Oxford University Press (2011). In the common law, Succession is the mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation agregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bla. Com. 430. From page 3176 of Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, Volume 2, L-Z (1914).

So, business succession law is an important area of law that governs the transfer of ownership of businesses from one owner to another. It is important for businesses that are owned by multiple individuals, as it helps to ensure that the business is transferred in accordance with the wishes of the owners. It is also important for businesses that are owned by a single individual, as it helps to ensure that the business is transferred in accordance with the wishes of the deceased owner. Attorney Jeremy Eveland helps business owners in Utah with succession or transfer of ownership of a business either by estate planning, succession planning, or mergers, acquisitions, or direct sales.

Business Succession Planning

The process of business succession planning involves numerous legal issues, such as the transfer of ownership, division of assets and liabilities, and the protection of the business’s interests. Ownership of a business can be transferred to a family member, outside party, or other entity in the form of a buy-sell agreement, estate plan, or other legal arrangement. A buy-sell agreement is a document that outlines the terms and conditions for the purchase and sale of a business, and can be used to transfer ownership of a business to a family member, outside party, or other entity.

Business Succession Lawyer Free Consultation

When you need a business succession attorney, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Areas We Serve

We serve businesses and business owners for succession planning in the following locations:

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer St. George Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Provo Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Sandy Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Estate Planning

Estate planning is also an important part of business succession planning. Estate planning involves the preparation of a will, trust, or other document that outlines the transfer of ownership and control of a business upon its owner’s death. It can also encompass the division of assets, liabilities, and taxes associated with the business. Estate planning can be especially important for family businesses, as it can help ensure that the business will be passed on to the next generation in the manner intended by the senior-generation owners.

The legal needs of business succession planning can be complex, and it is important to consult an experienced attorney to ensure that the process is handled correctly. Attorney Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD, a lawyer based in Utah, focuses his practice in business succession planning and estate planning. We provide legal services to many business owners and families, from estate planning to buy/sell agreements. We use our knowledge and experience to help families and businesses navigate the complexities of business succession law and ensure that their goals for the future of their business are achieved.

Business succession planning involves more than just legal services. It requires careful consideration of many different issues, from the transfer of ownership and control to the division of assets and liabilities. It is important to consider the needs of the business, its employees, and its owners, as well as the future of the business. Attorney Jeremy Eveland understands the nuances of business succession planning, and our attorneys provide comprehensive legal services to ensure that the needs of the business and its owners are met.

What Is Business Law?

Business succession law is a set of laws that govern the transfer of ownership of a business from one owner to another. This type of law is important for businesses that are owned by multiple individuals, as it helps to ensure that the business is transferred in accordance with the wishes of the owners. It is also important for businesses that are owned by a single individual, as it helps to ensure that the business is transferred in accordance with the wishes of the deceased owner.

Business succession law is primarily concerned with wills, intestacy, and the granting of probate. A will is a legal document that sets out the wishes of the deceased owner in regards to the transfer of ownership of the business. If the owner has not left a will, then the laws of intestate succession will apply. Intestate succession is a set of laws that govern the transfer of ownership of a business when the deceased owner did not leave a will. In either case, the court will grant a probate, which is a document that confirms the transfer of ownership of the business.

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is another important aspect of business succession law. ADR is a process in which parties attempt to resolve a dispute without going to court. This can include mediation, arbitration, or other forms of negotiation. ADR can be used to resolve disputes over the ownership of a business, as well as disputes over the distribution of assets or the payment of debts.

Business succession law also involves the transfer of ownership of stocks and other publicly traded securities. This includes the transfer of ownership of stock in a publicly traded company, as well as the transfer of ownership of other securities such as bonds and mutual funds. The transfer of ownership of stocks and other securities must be done in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction in which the securities are traded.

Business succession law also involves the transfer of ownership of life insurance policies. This includes the transfer of ownership of life insurance policies from the deceased owner to the beneficiaries of the policy. The transfer of ownership must be done in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction in which the policy is issued.

Sometimes, business succession law is concerned with wills, intestacy, the granting of probate, alternative dispute resolution, lawsuits and the transfer of ownership of stocks and other publicly traded securities. This is why your business succession lawyer needs to know about estate planning, estate administration and probate.

In addition to legal services, lawyer Eveland also offers specialized services related to business succession planning, such as: powers of attorney, last wills and testaments, advanced health care directives, revocable living trusts, irrevocable trusts, and more. Our team of experienced attorneys and advisors can help business owners and families evaluate their options and develop a comprehensive succession plan that meets their needs. Our attorneys provide advice on the various options available and help owners and families identify key employees and successors. We also provide guidance on issues such as estate planning, stock ownership, tax planning, and insurance.

We understand the complexities of business succession planning and provide comprehensive legal services to help business owners and families achieve their goals for the future of their business. Our attorneys and advisors are experienced in handling a variety of business succession issues, from the transfer of ownership and control to the division of assets and liabilities, and can provide the advice and guidance needed to ensure the continuity of the business and the protection of the owners’ interests. With our comprehensive services, we can help business owners and families develop a comprehensive business succession plan that meets their needs and ensures a successful transition for the business.

When you need legal help with business succession law in Utah, call attorney Jeremy Eveland for a business succession consultation (801) 613-1472 today.

Utah
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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This article is about the U.S. state. For other uses, see Utah (disambiguation).
Coordinates: 39°N 111°W

Utah
State
State of Utah
Flag of Utah
Flag
Official seal of Utah
Seal
Nickname(s): “Beehive State” (official), “The Mormon State”, “Deseret”
Motto: Industry
Anthem: “Utah…This Is the Place”
Map of the United States with Utah highlighted
Map of the United States with Utah highlighted
Country United States
Before statehood Utah Territory
Admitted to the Union January 4, 1896 (45th)
Capital
(and largest city) Salt Lake City
Largest metro and urban areas Salt Lake City
Government
• Governor Spencer Cox (R)
• Lieutenant Governor Deidre Henderson (R)
Legislature State Legislature
• Upper house State Senate
• Lower house House of Representatives
Judiciary Utah Supreme Court
U.S. senators Mike Lee (R)
Mitt Romney (R)
U.S. House delegation 1: Blake Moore (R)
2: Chris Stewart (R)
3: John Curtis (R)
4: Burgess Owens (R) (list)
Area
• Total 84,899 sq mi (219,887 km2)
• Land 82,144 sq mi (212,761 km2)
• Water 2,755 sq mi (7,136 km2) 3.25%
• Rank 13th
Dimensions
• Length 350 mi (560 km)
• Width 270 mi (435 km)
Elevation 6,100 ft (1,860 m)
Highest elevation (Kings Peak[1][2][a]) 13,534 ft (4,120.3 m)
Lowest elevation (Beaver Dam Wash at Arizona border[2][a][3]) 2,180 ft (664.4 m)
Population (2020)
• Total 3,271,616[4]
• Rank 30th
• Density 36.53/sq mi (14.12/km2)
• Rank 41st
• Median household income $60,365[5]
• Income rank 11th
Demonym Utahn or Utahan[6]
Language
• Official language English
Time zone UTC−07:00 (Mountain)
• Summer (DST) UTC−06:00 (MDT)
USPS abbreviation
UT
ISO 3166 code US-UT
Traditional abbreviation Ut.
Latitude 37° N to 42° N
Longitude 109°3′ W to 114°3′ W
Website utah.gov
Utah state symbols
Flag of Utah.svg
Flag of Utah
Seal of Utah.svg
Living insignia
Bird California gull
Fish Bonneville cutthroat trout[7]
Flower Sego lily
Grass Indian ricegrass
Mammal Rocky Mountain Elk
Reptile Gila monster
Tree Quaking aspen
Inanimate insignia
Dance Square dance
Dinosaur Utahraptor
Firearm Browning M1911
Fossil Allosaurus
Gemstone Topaz
Mineral Copper[7]
Rock Coal[7]
Tartan Utah State Centennial Tartan
State route marker
Utah state route marker
State quarter
Utah quarter dollar coin
Released in 2007
Lists of United States state symbols
Utah (/ˈjuːtɑː/ YOO-tah, /ˈjuːtɔː/ (listen) YOO-taw) is a state in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States. Utah is a landlocked U.S. state bordered to its east by Colorado, to its northeast by Wyoming, to its north by Idaho, to its south by Arizona, and to its west by Nevada. Utah also touches a corner of New Mexico in the southeast. Of the fifty U.S. states, Utah is the 13th-largest by area; with a population over three million, it is the 30th-most-populous and 11th-least-densely populated. Urban development is mostly concentrated in two areas: the Wasatch Front in the north-central part of the state, which is home to roughly two-thirds of the population and includes the capital city, Salt Lake City; and Washington County in the southwest, with more than 180,000 residents.[8] Most of the western half of Utah lies in the Great Basin.

Utah has been inhabited for thousands of years by various indigenous groups such as the ancient Puebloans, Navajo and Ute. The Spanish were the first Europeans to arrive in the mid-16th century, though the region’s difficult geography and harsh climate made it a peripheral part of New Spain and later Mexico. Even while it was Mexican territory, many of Utah’s earliest settlers were American, particularly Mormons fleeing marginalization and persecution from the United States. Following the Mexican–American War in 1848, the region was annexed by the U.S., becoming part of the Utah Territory, which included what is now Colorado and Nevada. Disputes between the dominant Mormon community and the federal government delayed Utah’s admission as a state; only after the outlawing of polygamy was it admitted in 1896 as the 45th.

People from Utah are known as Utahns.[9] Slightly over half of all Utahns are Mormons, the vast majority of whom are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), which has its world headquarters in Salt Lake City;[10] Utah is the only state where a majority of the population belongs to a single church.[11] The LDS Church greatly influences Utahn culture, politics, and daily life,[12] though since the 1990s the state has become more religiously diverse as well as secular.

Utah has a highly diversified economy, with major sectors including transportation, education, information technology and research, government services, mining, and tourism. Utah has been one of the fastest growing states since 2000,[13] with the 2020 U.S. census confirming the fastest population growth in the nation since 2010. St. George was the fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States from 2000 to 2005.[14] Utah ranks among the overall best states in metrics such as healthcare, governance, education, and infrastructure.[15] It has the 14th-highest median average income and the least income inequality of any U.S. state. Over time and influenced by climate change, droughts in Utah have been increasing in frequency and severity,[16] putting a further strain on Utah’s water security and impacting the state’s economy.[17]

Salt Lake City, Utah

About Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City is the capital and most populous city of Utah, United States. It is the seat of Salt Lake County, the most populous county in Utah. With a population of 200,133 in 2020, the city is the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which had a population of 1,257,936 at the 2020 census. Salt Lake City is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area, a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along a 120-mile (190 km) segment of the Wasatch Front, comprising a population of 2,746,164, making it the 22nd largest in the nation. It is also the central core of the larger of only two major urban areas located within the Great Basin.

Bus Stops in Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

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Bus Stop in 200 S / 1000 E (EB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Salt Lake Central Station (Bay B) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 2100 S / 700 E (WB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 900 E / Wilson Ave (SB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Intermodal Hub - Salt Lake City Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Us Hwy 89 @ 270 S (N. Salt Lake) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

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Map of Salt Lake City, Utah

Driving Directions in Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Driving Directions from Snow Christensen & Martineau to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Parr Brown Gee & Loveless to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Shumway Van - Lawyers in Salt Lake City to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Lewis Hansen Law Firm to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from McKay, Burton & Thurman, P.C. to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from The Franchise & Business Law Group to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Richards Brandt to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Henriksen & Henriksen to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Hepworth Legal to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Lincoln Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Holland & Hart LLP - Salt Lake City to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Reviews for Jeremy Eveland Salt Lake City, Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

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Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Do you need a Business Succession Lawyer in Salt Lake City Utah? If you do, then you are at the right place. Attorney Jeremy Eveland helps businesses create succession plans. Call Jeremy Eveland today for your free business succession consultation (801) 613-1472.

Business succession is the process of transferring ownership and management of a business from one generation to the next. It involves the transfer of ownership and control of the business from the founder, or current owner, to the successor. Succession planning is the process of identifying and developing potential successors in order to ensure the continued success and growth of the business.

Succession planning typically involves identifying the key roles and responsibilities of the business owner and planning for their transition to a successor. This can involve developing a plan for the transfer of ownership and control of the business, as well as developing a plan for the transition of key roles and responsibilities to the successor. This could include training, mentoring, and support for the new owner.

Succession planning also involves developing a plan for the financial security of the business. This could involve setting up a trust fund or other financial vehicles to ensure that the business is financially secure and that the successor has access to the necessary funds needed to manage and grow the business.

Business succession is an important part of any business and is essential for the continued success and growth of the business. Proper succession planning can help ensure that the business is able to continue to thrive and provide the necessary resources and support for the successor.

Why put much stock in business advice?

Each and every one of these entrepreneurs sharing their business advice with you have had their own unique journey to building a successful business. They are all different. Some came from backgrounds of wealth and influential connections, while others have built empires starting truly from nothing. Don’t take the business advice you hear as gospel to be followed word-for-word. Rather, use it as a tool to inform your big decisions and major strategic moves within your own business.

Here is some actual advice:

 The best businesses come from people’s bad personal experiences. If you just keep your eyes open, you’re going to find something that frustrates you, and then you think, ‘well I could maybe do it better than it’s being done,’ and there you have a business. If you can change people’s lives, you have a business.” People think, ‘well everything’s been thought of,’ but actually, all of the time, there are gaps in the market here and gaps in the market there.”

 If you are going to start a business, you need to really love it, because not everybody is going to love it. “You have to really believe in your product to deal with the naysayers and persevere and when you really believe in your product, you are willing to deal with all the naysayers and persevere.”

 Choose something that you both love and are good at doing. Then, taking that first step is always the hardest. It’s terrifying, but really, it’s about preparation. We all go through this process where you’ve got the business idea, you get that feeling in your stomach and you get all excited. Then you talk to a friend, and your friend says, ‘oh wow that’s pretty cool, I’ve never heard of anything like that. I would buy that.’ And then you do the Google search. The first thing is that just because you don’t see it on Google, doesn’t mean one hundred companies haven’t gone out of business doing the same thing. It hasn’t been done for a reason, because every company that’s tried it, has gone out of business.

 You have 90 seconds, if you’re lucky. If you can’t make your point persuasively in that time, you’ve lost the chance for impact. Facts and figures are important, but it’s not the only criteria, you must present in a manner that generates expertise and confidence. “You have 90sec to make an impact in your pitch. Show expertise and confidence.” If you’re not prepared to make your pitch, you may just miss your next big opportunity.

 Don’t give up, don’t take anything personally, and don’t take no for an answer; you never know what you’re going to learn along the way. “The people who told me no, were the people that eventually told me yes; so don’t forget it.”

 The most painful mistake in first-time entrepreneurs is thinking that just having a business plan or a great concept is enough to guarantee success. It’s not. Business success is 80% psychology and 20% mechanics. And, frankly, most people’s psychology is not meant for building a business. “Think honestly about who you are, what you want to accomplish, and what mindset you need to have to get there. Because the biggest thing that will hold you back is your own nature. Few people are natural risk-takers or emotionally ready for the challenges of building a business. You can’t just sign up for a marathon and run it without ever training. You have to increase your capacity and become fit. Being an entrepreneur requires similar kinds of emotional and psychological fitness so that you don’t become the chokehold on your business’s success.”

 You’re the average of the 5 people you associate with most. “Choose friends wisely. “It is also said that ‘your network is your net worth.’ These two work well together.”

 Focus on the prototype. Don’t focus on your pitch deck, business plan or financial projections. “If you get a prototype out and you get enough people using it, you never have to write a business plan, do a forecast or do anything like that. A prototype is where you separate the BS from the reality.”

 Start now, you don’t need funding. Watch out for when you want to do something big, but say you can’t until you raise money to fund the idea. It usually means you are more in love with the idea of being big than with actually doing something useful. “For an idea to be big, it has to be useful and being useful doesn’t need funding.” If you want to be useful, you can always start right now with just 1% of what you have in your grand vision. It will be a humble prototype of your grand vision, but you will be in the game. You’ll be ahead of the rest because you actually started, when others waited for the finish line to magically appear at the starting line.

 The easiest way to tell if someone is a first-time entrepreneur is when they are secretive about their ideas. Real entrepreneurs know good ideas are cheap and that success comes from hard work, not a stroke of genius. The other big mistake entrepreneurs make is building a product for a customer they don’t know well. That’s why entrepreneurs should build a product for themselves, at least that way you ensure you have built something for a user you know intimately. All of the great tech companies of the past decade–Facebook, Twitter, Slack, Snapchat–were built by founders who were making products they wanted to use.

 They wait to get started. They wait until they have more information, more experience, more, more money, and a more perfect version of whatever they have created. “The best way to learn is by doing. Stop waiting and bring your ideas to life today.” All that waiting means they are not really learning. When you are an entrepreneur, the best way to learn is to do something, to put your idea into someone’s hands, or to talk to the people you want to serve. Stop waiting and do something.

 Scratch your own itch. Go after solving a problem that you have. Something that’s near and dear to you, not some random market opportunity. “Because, when things get hard, if you are chasing just the dollars, or a random market opportunity, you are not going to be able to have the fortitude, the passion, to stay with it.”

 Don’t waste time or spend money on non-core issues when starting a business. In fact, don’t spend any money until you make some.

 One of the most painful and common mistakes first-time entrepreneurs make is that they fall in love with their own business idea. They will spend months building what they believe to be the next innovative, disruptive, game-changing startup. Then they launch… and nobody buys, nobody cares, nothing happens. “Don’t fall in love with your idea, fall in love with the problem you’re solving and validate your business idea early on that it is a problem worth solving.”

 There is no path! Another big mistake first-time entrepreneurs make is they desperately want a structured business plan and direct path. “Don’t plan everything! Listen to your customers and make changes as needed.” One of the most important things about starting a business is being flexible. Listening to customers, watching data and making iterations and changes as needed. Sometimes having a path or a rigid business plan can limit you. Think of your business like a meadow not a path, just play!

 Perfectionism cripples a lot of entrepreneurs. They won’t launch their site or put their product up for sale until they think it’s perfect, which is a big waste of time. It’s never going to be perfect. “Don’t let perfectionism cripple you. Launch as soon as possible and adapt.” Pitch your product or service as soon as you have the bare bones of it put together. This will give you valuable feedback about whether your market really wants it. You can polish it later.”

 Being an entrepreneur takes hustle. And here’s the problem: Sometimes we think hustle is about becoming a workaholic or adding a lot of stuff to our lives. “Hustle the right way. It’s not about doing more, it’s about doing what you need to do.” Hustle is an act of focus, not frenzy. Hustle is about subtraction and addition. It’s not about doing more, it’s about focusing on the things that you need to do, in order to move your business forward.

 Perfect is a curse. Innovation is messy. Test, learn, and improve. Often new entrepreneurs wait too long to put their product out in the market. With limited resources at hand, it is crucial that you get an MVP out as soon as possible and start getting traction. Take the user’s feedback to iterate and improve your products. “Not launching fast enough is a mistake you simply can’t afford to make. If you want to get an edge over others, launch now!”

 The most painful mistake entrepreneurs make is copying or doing the same things that successful entrepreneurs have done, expecting similar results. What first-time entrepreneurs don’t realize is that the world is not a vacuum and there’s more going on behind the scenes than it appears. There’s much more effort that has gone into creating the success they see on the surface, and there’s no guarantee that a particular tactic or strategy will be successful for everyone. “First time entrepreneurs should not get caught up in the glamour and don’t take things for face value. Rather, use these successes you read about as inspiration for what you can do too. Set more realistic blogging goals and forget about ‘going viral’ or trying to be like someone else.”

 Most people start out with completely unrealistic expectations of what level of effort is required and how long it takes to get a business off the ground. They are easily discouraged and give up way too soon. I blame it on wishful thinking. “There’s no guarantee in business. Approach it with humility, grit and determination.” The reality is that there is no way to know how long it will take or whether it will work at all. So approach it with humility, grit and a willingness to do whatever it takes to succeed, even if that means you have to work really hard for a long time.

Wills are written documents that outline how assets should be distributed upon death. This can include the option to purchase a business that has not been sold before the owner’s death. Life insurance policies and testamentary trusts, which allow for tax-free distributions after death, can also be used for this purpose. An advanced directive, such as a living will, can provide instructions for health care decisions in the event of incapacity, while personal liability protection can help protect family members from being held responsible for debts incurred by the deceased’s estate or business operations.

Effective business succession planning involves creating employment contracts with key personnel who will take over management responsibilities, establishing retirement plans, purchasing appropriate insurance coverage, understanding intestacy laws (in the absence of a valid will), and navigating probate proceedings if necessary. Financial considerations, including taxes on income generated by the company before its sale or transfer and outstanding loans that need to be paid off at closing, must also be taken into account.

Succession planning is important to ensure that all parties involved feel secure about their future prospects within the organization once ownership changes hands, whether due to retirement, illness, disability, or death. It is essential to ensure continuity and financial stability throughout the transition period until new owners fully assume responsibility for daily operation

Attorney Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD is an attorney licensed to practice law in Utah only. This is not legal advice. If you need actual legal advice for your situation you need to speak with a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction and who understands and goes over the particular facts of your case. Facts matter. If you have questions about Business Succession in Salt Lake City Utah, call Mr. Eveland for a free consultation (801) 613-1472.

Salt Lake City

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
Salt Lake City, Utah
City of Salt Lake City[1]
Clockwise from top: The skyline in July 2011, Utah State Capitol, TRAX, Union Pacific Depot, the Block U, the City-County Building, and the Salt Lake Temple

Clockwise from top: The skyline in July 2011, Utah State CapitolTRAXUnion Pacific Depot, the Block U, the City-County Building, and the Salt Lake Temple
Nickname: 

“The Crossroads of the West”

 
Interactive map of Salt Lake City
Coordinates: 40°45′39″N 111°53′28″WCoordinates40°45′39″N 111°53′28″W
Country United States United States
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Platted 1857; 165 years ago[2]
Named for Great Salt Lake
Government

 
 • Type Strong Mayor–council
 • Mayor Erin Mendenhall (D)
Area

 • City 110.81 sq mi (286.99 km2)
 • Land 110.34 sq mi (285.77 km2)
 • Water 0.47 sq mi (1.22 km2)
Elevation

 
4,327 ft (1,288 m)
Population

 • City 200,133
 • Rank 122nd in the United States
1st in Utah
 • Density 1,797.52/sq mi (701.84/km2)
 • Urban

 
1,021,243 (US: 42nd)
 • Metro

 
1,257,936 (US: 47th)
 • CSA

 
2,606,548 (US: 22nd)
Demonym Salt Laker[5]
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6
ZIP Codes
show

ZIP Codes[6]
Area codes 801, 385
FIPS code 49-67000[7]
GNIS feature ID 1454997[8]
Major airport Salt Lake City International Airport
Website Salt Lake City Government

Salt Lake City (often shortened to Salt Lake and abbreviated as SLC) is the capital and most populous city of Utah, as well as the seat of Salt Lake County, the most populous county in Utah. With a population of 200,133 in 2020,[10] the city is the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which had a population of 1,257,936 at the 2020 census. Salt Lake City is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area, a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along a 120-mile (190 km) segment of the Wasatch Front, comprising a population of 2,606,548 (as of 2018 estimates),[11] making it the 22nd largest in the nation. It is also the central core of the larger of only two major urban areas located within the Great Basin (the other being Reno, Nevada).

Salt Lake City was founded July 24, 1847, by early pioneer settlers, led by Brigham Young, who were seeking to escape persecution they had experienced while living farther east. The Mormon pioneers, as they would come to be known, entered a semi-arid valley and immediately began planning and building an extensive irrigation network which could feed the population and foster future growth. Salt Lake City’s street grid system is based on a standard compass grid plan, with the southeast corner of Temple Square (the area containing the Salt Lake Temple in downtown Salt Lake City) serving as the origin of the Salt Lake meridian. Owing to its proximity to the Great Salt Lake, the city was originally named Great Salt Lake City. In 1868, the word “Great” was dropped from the city’s name.[12]

Immigration of international members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saintsmining booms, and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad initially brought economic growth, and the city was nicknamed “The Crossroads of the West”. It was traversed by the Lincoln Highway, the first transcontinental highway, in 1913. Two major cross-country freeways, I-15 and I-80, now intersect in the city. The city also has a belt route, I-215.

Salt Lake City has developed a strong tourist industry based primarily on skiing and outdoor recreation. It hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics. It is known for its politically progressive and diverse culture, which stands at contrast with the rest of the state’s conservative leanings.[13] It is home to a significant LGBT community and hosts the annual Utah Pride Festival.[14] It is the industrial banking center of the United States.[15] Salt Lake City and the surrounding area are also the location of several institutions of higher education including the state’s flagship research school, the University of Utah. Sustained drought in Utah has more recently strained Salt Lake City’s water security and caused the Great Salt Lake level drop to record low levels,[16][17] and impacting the state’s economy, of which the Wasatch Front area anchored by Salt Lake City constitutes 80%.[18]

Salt Lake City, Utah

About Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City is the capital and most populous city of Utah, United States. It is the seat of Salt Lake County, the most populous county in Utah. With a population of 200,133 in 2020, the city is the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which had a population of 1,257,936 at the 2020 census. Salt Lake City is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area, a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along a 120-mile (190 km) segment of the Wasatch Front, comprising a population of 2,746,164, making it the 22nd largest in the nation. It is also the central core of the larger of only two major urban areas located within the Great Basin.

Bus Stops in Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Greyhound: Bus Station Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Greyhound: Bus Stop Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in UTA Bus Salt Lake Central Station Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Stadium Station (EB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Salt Lake City Station Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 200 S / 1000 E (EB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Salt Lake Central Station (Bay B) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 2100 S / 700 E (WB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 900 E / Wilson Ave (SB) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Intermodal Hub - Salt Lake City Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Us Hwy 89 @ 270 S (N. Salt Lake) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 200 S / 1100 E (Wb) Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Map of Salt Lake City, Utah

Driving Directions in Salt Lake City, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Driving Directions from Snow Christensen & Martineau to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Parr Brown Gee & Loveless to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Shumway Van - Lawyers in Salt Lake City to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Lewis Hansen Law Firm to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from McKay, Burton & Thurman, P.C. to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from The Franchise & Business Law Group to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Richards Brandt to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Henriksen & Henriksen to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Hepworth Legal to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Lincoln Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Holland & Hart LLP - Salt Lake City to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Reviews for Jeremy Eveland Salt Lake City, Utah

Succession Planning

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Business succession planning[edit]

Effective succession or talent-pool management concerns itself with building a series of feeder groups up and down the entire leadership pipeline or progression.[6] In contrast, replacement planning is focused narrowly on identifying specific back-up candidates for given senior management positions. Thought should be given to the retention of key employees, and the consequences that the departure of key employees may have on the business.[7]

Fundamental to the succession-management process is an underlying philosophy that argues that top talent in the corporation must be managed for the greater good of the enterprise. Merck and other companies argue that a “talent mindset” must be part of the leadership culture for these practices to be effective.[8]

Organizations use succession planning as a process to ensure that employees are recruited and developed to fill each key role within the company. Through one’s succession-planning process, one recruits superior employees,[citation needed] develops their knowledge, skills, and abilities, and prepares them for advancement or promotion into ever more-challenging roles. Actively pursuing succession planning ensures that employees are constantly developed to fill each needed role. As one’s organization expands, loses key employees, provides promotional opportunities, or increases sales, one’s succession planning aims to ensure that one has employees on hand ready and waiting to fill new roles. Succession planning is one of important processes in leadership pipeline.

According to a 2006 Canadian Federation of Independent Business survey,[9] slightly more than one third of owners of independent businesses plan to exit their business within the next 5 years – and within the next 10 years two-thirds of owners plan to exit their business. The survey also found that Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are not adequately prepared for their business succession: only 10% of owners have a formal, written succession plan; 38% have an informal, unwritten plan; and the remaining 52% do not have any succession plan at all. A 2004 CIBC survey suggests that succession planning is increasingly becoming a critical issue. The CIBC estimated that by 2010, $1.2 trillion in business assets would be poised to change hands.[10]

Research indicates many succession-planning initiatives fall short of their intent.[11] “Bench strength”, as it is commonly called, remains a stubborn problem in many if not most companies. Studies indicate that companies that report the greatest gains from succession planning feature high ownership by the CEO and high degrees of engagement among the larger leadership team.[12]

Companies well known for their succession planning and executive-talent development practices include: General ElectricHoneywellIBMMarriottMicrosoftPepsi and Procter & Gamble.

Research indicates that clear objectives are critical to establishing effective succession planning.[12] These objectives tend to be core to many or most companies that have well-established practices:

  • Identify those with the potential to assume greater responsibility in the organization
  • Provide critical development experiences to those that can move into key roles
  • Engage the leadership in supporting the development of high-potential leaders
  • Build a database that can be used to make better staffing decisions for key jobs

In other companies these additional objectives may be embedded in the succession process:

  • Improve employee commitment and retention
  • Meet the career development expectations of existing employees
  • Counter the increasing difficulty and costs of recruiting employees externally

Process and practices[edit]

Companies devise elaborate models to characterize their succession and development practices. Most reflect a cyclical series of activities that include these fundamentals:

  • Identify key roles for succession or replacement planning
  • Define the competencies and motivational profile required to undertake those roles
  • Assess people against these criteria – with a future orientation
  • Identify pools of talent that could potentially fill and perform highly in key roles
  • Develop employees to be ready for advancement into key roles – primarily through the right set of experiences.

In many companies, over the past several years,[when?] the emphasis has shifted from planning job assignments to development, with much greater focus on managing key experiences that are critical to growing global-business leaders.[citation needed] North American companies tend to be more active in this regard, followed by European and Latin American countries.

PepsiCo, IBM and Nike provide current examples of the so-called “game-planning” approach to succession and talent management. In these and other companies annual reviews are supplemented with an ongoing series of discussions among senior leaders about who is ready to assume larger roles. Vacancies are anticipated and slates of names are prepared based on highest potential and readiness for job moves. Organization realignments are viewed as critical windows-of-opportunity to utilize development moves that will serve the greater good of the enterprise.

Assessment is a key practice in effective succession-planning. There is no widely accepted formula for evaluating the future potential of leaders, but many tools and approaches continue to be used today, ranging from personality and cognitive testing to team-based interviewing and simulations and other Assessment centre methods. Elliott Jaques and others have argued for the importance of focusing assessments narrowly on critical differentiators of future performance. Jaques developed a persuasive case for measuring candidates’ ability to manage complexity, formulating a robust operational definition of business intelligence.[13] The Cognitive Process Profile (CPP) psychometric is an example of a tool used in succession planning to measure candidates’ ability to manage complexity according to Jaques’ definition.

Companies struggle to find practices that are effective and practical. It is clear that leaders who rely on instinct and gut to make promotion decisions are often not effective.[citation needed] Research indicates that the most valid practices for assessment are those that involve multiple methods and especially multiple raters.[14][need quotation to verify] “Calibration meetings” composed of senior leaders can be quite effective in judging a slate of potential senior leaders with the right tools and facilitation.[citation needed]

With organisations facing increasing complexity and uncertainty in their operating environments some[quantify] suggest a move away from competence-based approaches.[15] In a future that is increasingly hard to predict leaders will need to see opportunity in volatility, spot patterns in complexity, find creative solutions to problems, keep in mind long-term strategic goals for the organisation and wider society, and hold onto uncertainty until the optimum time to make a decision.[citation needed]

Professionals in the field, including academics, consultants and corporate practitioners, have many strongly-held views on the topic. Best practice is a slippery concept in this field. There are many thought-pieces on the subject that readers may[original research?] find valuable, such as “Debunking 10 Top Talent Management Myths”, Talent Management Magazine, Doris Sims, December 2009. Research-based writing is more difficult to find. The Corporate Leadership Council, The Best Practice Institute (BPI) and the Center for Creative Leadership, as well as the Human Resources Planning Society, are sources of some effective research-based materials.

Over the years,[when?] organizations have changed their approach to succession planning. What used to be a rigid, confidential process of hand-picking executives to be company successors is now becoming a more fluid, transparent practice that identifies high-potential leaders and incorporates development programs preparing them for top positions.[16] As of 2017 corporations consider succession planning a part of a holistic strategy called “talent management”.[citation needed] According to the company PEMCO, “talent management is defined as the activities and processes throughout the employee life cycle: recruiting and hiring, Onboarding, training, professional development, performance management, workforce planning, leadership development, career development, cross-functional work assignments, succession planning, and the employee exit process”.[16] When managing internal talent, companies must “know whether the right people, are moving at the right pace into the right jobs at the right time”.[17] An effective succession-planning strategy, coupled with solid career-development programs, will help paint a more promising future for employees.[citation needed]

Succession management[edit]

A substantial body of literature discusses succession planning. The first book that addressed the topic fully was “Executive Continuity” by Walter Mahler. Mahler was responsible in the 1970s for helping to shape the General Electric succession process which became the gold standard of corporate practice. Mahler, who was heavily influenced by Peter Drucker, wrote three other books on the subject of succession, all of which are out of print. His colleagues, Steve Drotter and Greg Kesler,[12] as well as others, expanded on Mahler’s work in their writings. “The Leadership Pipeline: How to Build the Leadership Powered Company”, by Charan, Drotter and Noel is noteworthy.[6][need quotation to verify] A new edited collection of materials, edited by Marshall Goldsmith, describes many contemporary examples in large companies.[18]

Most large corporations assign a process owner for talent and succession management. Resourcing of the work varies widely – from numbers of highly dedicated internal consultants to limited professional support embedded in the roles of human-resources generalists. Often these staff resources are separate from external staffing or recruiting functions. As of 2017 some companies seek to integrate internal and external staffing. Others are more inclined to integrate succession management with the performance management process in order simplify the work for line managers.

Succession advisors[edit]

A prior preparation needs to be done for the replacement of a CEO in family firms.[citation needed] The role of advisors is important as they help with the transition of leadership between the current-generation leaders and the successors.[citation needed] Advisors help family-owned businesses establish their own leadership skills. This process is relatively long if the successors want to be accepted by all employees. They need to take higher managing positions gradually to be respected. During this process, the successors are asked to develop different skills such as leadership. This is where the role of advisors fully exemplifies its importance. It is when the managing position is shared between the first-generation leader, the second and the advisors. An advisor helps with communication because emotional factors between family members can badly affect the company. The advisors help manage everything during a predetermined period of time and make the succession process less painful and eventful for everybody. In these cases, an interim leadership is usually what is best for the company. The employees can get accustomed to changes while getting to know the future CEO.[19][20]

Business Exit Planning[edit]

With the global proliferation of SMEs, issues of business succession and continuity have become increasingly common. When the owner of a business becomes incapacitated or passes away, it is often necessary to shut down an otherwise healthy business. Or in many instances, successors inherit a healthy business, which is forced into bankruptcy because of lack of available liquidity to pay inheritance taxes and other taxes. Proper planning helps avoid many of the problems associated with succession and transfer of ownership.

Business Exit Planning is a body of knowledge which began developing in the United States towards the end of the 20th century[citation needed], and is now spreading globally. A Business Exit Planning exercise begins with the shareholder(s) of a company defining their objectives with respect to an eventual exit, and then executing their plan, as the following definition suggests:

Business Exit Planning is the process of explicitly defining exit-related objectives for the owner(s) of a business, followed by the design of a comprehensive strategy and road map that take into account all personal, business, financial, legal, and taxation aspects of achieving those objectives, usually in the context of planning the leadership succession and continuity of a business. Objectives may include maximizing (or setting a goal for) proceeds, minimizing risk, closing a Transaction quickly, or selecting an investor that will ensure that the business prospers. The strategy should also take into account contingencies such as illness or death.[21]

All personal, financial, and business aspects should be taken into consideration. This is also a good time to plan an efficient transfer from the point of view of possibly applicable estate taxes, capital gains taxes, or other taxes.

Sale of a business is not the only form of exit. Forms of exit may also include initial public offering, management buyout, passing on the firm to next-of-kin, or even bankruptcy. Bringing on board financial strategic or financial partners may also be considered a form of exit, to the extent that it may help ensure succession and survival of the business.

In developed countries, the so-called “baby boomer” demographic wave is now reaching the stage where serious consideration needs to be given to exit. Hence, the importance of Business Exit Planning is expected to further increase in the coming years.

Family business[edit]

Small business succession tends to focus on how a business will continue to operate once its founder or initial leadership team retires or otherwise leaves the business. While small businesses on the whole often fail after the departure of their initial leadership team, succession planning can result in significantly improved chances for a business’s continuation.[22]

Within the context of succession planning, where a small business is owned by a group of managers or partners, thought should be given to the transition of the business to the partners, how departure from a business will be managed, and how shares or ownership interest will be valued for purposes of sale or buy-out.[23]

When succession occurs within a company’s hierarchy, succession plans should consider issues that may arise relating to retention of the intended successor, the possibility of jealousy by other employees, and how other employees will respond when they learn of the succession plan.[23] Additional issues are likely to arise if succession is to a family member,[24] particularly if more than one child of the managing owner works for the business or if siblings who do not work for the business will gain shares without having invested time and energy in the business.[23]

Small businesses and perhaps especially family businesses benefit from creating a disciplined succession process, involving,

  • Discussion and commitment by the shareholders;
  • Careful candidate selection; and
  • Integration and development of the selected successor.[22]

No part of the process should be rushed, with the integration process being expected to take roughly two years.[22]

Succession planning is a process and strategy for replacement planning or passing on leadership roles. It is used to identify and develop new, potential leaders who can move into leadership roles when they become vacant.[1][2] Succession planning in dictatorshipsmonarchies, politics, and international relations is used to ensure continuity and prevention of power struggle.[3][4] Within monarchies succession is settled by the order of succession.[3] In business, succession planning entails developing internal people with managing or leadership potential to fill key hierarchical positions in the company. It is a process of identifying critical roles in a company and the core skills associated with those roles, and then identifying possible internal candidates to assume those roles when they become vacant.[2] Succession planning also applies to small and family businesses (including farms and agriculture) where it is the process used to transition the ownership and management of a business to the next generation.[5]

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