Tag Archives: estate administration lawyers

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Probate Lawyer Murray Utah

“Probate Lawyer Murray Utah: Your Trusted Guide to Navigating the Complexities of Estate Planning.”

Introduction

Probate Lawyer Murray Utah is a law firm that specializes in probate law. We provide legal services to individuals and families in the Murray, Utah area. Our experienced attorneys have a deep understanding of the probate process and can help you navigate the complexities of probate law. We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality legal representation and strive to ensure that their rights are protected throughout the probate process. Whether you are dealing with the death of a loved one, or need assistance with estate planning, our attorneys are here to help.

Estate Planning Litigation Services Offered by Murray, Utah Lawyers

Murray, Utah lawyers offer a variety of estate planning litigation services to help clients protect their assets and ensure their wishes are carried out. Estate planning litigation involves the legal process of resolving disputes related to the distribution of assets, the management of trusts, and other matters related to estate planning.

Estate planning litigation services offered by Murray, Utah lawyers include:

Will Contests: Will contests involve challenging the validity of a will or trust. Murray, Utah lawyers can help clients contest a will or trust if they believe it was created under duress, was not properly executed, or was created by someone who lacked the mental capacity to do so.

Trust litigation: Trust litigation involves disputes over the management of a trust. Murray, Utah lawyers can help clients resolve disputes over the distribution of trust assets, the management of trust funds, and other matters related to trust administration.

Probate Litigation: Probate litigation involves disputes over the distribution of assets after a person’s death. Murray, Utah lawyers can help clients resolve disputes over the distribution of assets, the management of trusts, and other matters related to probate.

Guardianship Litigation: Guardianship litigation involves disputes over the appointment of a guardian for a minor or incapacitated adult. Murray, Utah lawyers can help clients resolve disputes over the appointment of a guardian, the management of a guardianship, and other matters related to guardianship.

Estate Planning Litigation: Estate planning litigation involves disputes over the creation and execution of estate plans. Murray, Utah lawyers can help clients resolve disputes over the creation of wills and trusts, the management of assets, and other matters related to estate planning.

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Murray, Utah lawyers can provide experienced legal representation to help clients protect their assets and ensure their wishes are carried out. If you are involved in an estate planning dispute, contact a Murray, Utah lawyer today to discuss your legal options.

Last Wills and Testament

This is a sample of a very basic will. You should not use this – it is just to show you what they look like so you can identify one. I, [Name], of [City, State], being of sound mind and body, do hereby make, publish, and declare this to be my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking any and all former wills and codicils by me at any time made.

I direct that all of my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon as possible after my death.

I give, devise, and bequeath all of my property, both real and personal, of every kind and nature, and wheresoever situated, to my [spouse/children/other], in equal shares, share and share alike.

I appoint [Name] to be the Executor of this my Last Will and Testament. I direct that my Executor shall not be required to give bond or security in any jurisdiction.

I hereby declare that if any of the above-named beneficiaries should predecease me, then the share of such beneficiary shall pass to his or her issue, per stirpes.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this [date].

[Name]

[Signature]

Intestate Succession in Murray Utah

In Murray, Utah, intestate succession is the process by which a person’s estate is distributed when they die without a valid will. This process is governed by the laws of the state of Utah.

Under Utah law, the surviving spouse of the deceased is entitled to the entire estate if there are no surviving children or grandchildren. If there are surviving children or grandchildren, the surviving spouse is entitled to one-half of the estate. The remaining half is divided among the surviving children and grandchildren. If there are no surviving children or grandchildren, the estate is divided among the surviving parents, siblings, and other relatives of the deceased.

In addition to the distribution of the estate, the surviving spouse is also entitled to certain rights and privileges, such as the right to use the deceased’s homestead for a period of time and the right to receive a portion of the deceased’s personal property.

If there is no surviving spouse, the estate is divided among the surviving children and grandchildren. If there are no surviving children or grandchildren, the estate is divided among the surviving parents, siblings, and other relatives of the deceased.

In some cases, the court may appoint an administrator to manage the estate. The administrator is responsible for collecting and distributing the assets of the estate in accordance with the laws of the state of Utah.

It is important to note that intestate succession is a complex process and it is best to consult with an experienced attorney to ensure that the estate is distributed according to the wishes of the deceased.

Estate Planning Reviews Offered by Murray, Utah Lawyers

Estate planning is an important part of ensuring that your assets are protected and distributed according to your wishes. Murray, Utah lawyers offer estate planning reviews to help you make sure that your estate plan is up to date and meets your needs.

A Murray, Utah lawyer can review your existing estate plan to make sure that it is up to date and that it meets your current needs. They can also help you create a new estate plan if you do not have one. During the review, your lawyer will look at your current assets, debts, and liabilities, and make sure that your estate plan is structured to protect your assets and provide for your family.

Your lawyer can also review your will and other documents to make sure that they are legally valid and up to date. They can also help you create a trust or other estate planning documents if needed.

Your lawyer can also review your beneficiary designations to make sure that they are up to date and that they reflect your wishes. They can also help you create a power of attorney document to ensure that your wishes are carried out if you become incapacitated.

Finally, your lawyer can review your estate plan to make sure that it is tax efficient and that it meets your goals. They can also help you create a plan to minimize taxes and maximize the value of your estate.

Estate planning reviews are an important part of making sure that your estate plan is up to date and meets your needs. Murray, Utah lawyers can provide you with the expertise and guidance you need to ensure that your estate plan is structured to protect your assets and provide for your family.

Contesting a Will in Murray Utah

Contesting a Will in Murray, Utah can be a complex process. It is important to understand the legal process and the potential outcomes before beginning the process.

In Utah, a will can be contested if the person making the will was not of sound mind, was unduly influenced, or if the will was not properly executed. In order to contest a will, the person contesting the will must file a petition in the district court in the county where the deceased person lived. The petition must include the reasons why the will should be contested.

Once the petition is filed, the court will appoint an executor to oversee the estate. The executor will be responsible for gathering all of the assets of the deceased person and distributing them according to the will. The executor will also be responsible for notifying all of the beneficiaries of the will.

The court will then hold a hearing to determine if the will should be contested. At the hearing, the person contesting the will must present evidence to support their claim. This may include testimony from witnesses, documents, or other evidence. The court will then make a decision as to whether or not the will should be contested.

If the court decides to contest the will, the executor will be responsible for distributing the assets of the estate according to the court’s decision. This may mean that the assets are distributed differently than what was stated in the will.

It is important to understand that contesting a will is a complex process and can be costly. It is important to consult with an experienced attorney before beginning the process. An attorney can help you understand the legal process and the potential outcomes.

Estate Planning Tools in Murray, Utah

Murray, Utah is a great place to live and work, and it is important to plan for the future. Estate planning is an important part of financial planning, and there are a variety of tools available to help Murray residents plan for their future.

One of the most important estate planning tools is a will. A will is a legal document that outlines how a person’s assets should be distributed after their death. It is important to have a will in place to ensure that your wishes are followed and that your assets are distributed according to your wishes.

Another important estate planning tool is a trust. A trust is a legal entity that holds assets for the benefit of another person or entity. Trusts can be used to protect assets from creditors, to provide for the care of minor children, or to provide for the care of a disabled family member.

Power of attorney is another important estate planning tool. Power of attorney allows a person to appoint another person to make decisions on their behalf in the event that they become incapacitated. This can be a valuable tool for ensuring that your wishes are followed in the event of an illness or injury.

Finally, life insurance is an important estate planning tool. Life insurance can provide financial security for your family in the event of your death. It can also be used to pay for funeral expenses and other debts.

Estate planning is an important part of financial planning, and there are a variety of tools available to help Murray residents plan for their future. By taking the time to create a will, set up a trust, appoint a power of attorney, and purchase life insurance, Murray residents can ensure that their wishes are followed and that their assets are distributed according to their wishes.

Business Interests and Estate Planning

Business interests and estate planning are important considerations for any business owner. Proper planning can help ensure that your business interests are protected and that your estate is managed in a way that meets your goals.

When it comes to business interests, it is important to consider the legal structure of your business. This includes the type of entity you choose, such as a corporation, limited liability company, or partnership. Each of these entities has different tax implications and legal requirements. It is important to understand the differences between them and choose the one that best meets your needs.

In addition, it is important to consider the ownership structure of your business. This includes who owns the business, how much each owner owns, and how the ownership is divided. It is important to consider the tax implications of each ownership structure and to ensure that the ownership structure is properly documented.

When it comes to estate planning, it is important to consider how your assets will be distributed after your death. This includes deciding who will receive your assets, how they will be distributed, and how taxes will be paid. It is important to consider the tax implications of each option and to ensure that your estate plan is properly documented.

Finally, it is important to consider how your business interests and estate plan will be managed after your death. This includes deciding who will manage your business interests and estate plan, how they will be managed, and how disputes will be resolved. It is important to consider the tax implications of each option and to ensure that your estate plan is properly documented.

By taking the time to consider your business interests and estate plan, you can ensure that your business interests are protected and that your estate is managed in a way that meets your goals. Proper planning can help ensure that your business interests and estate plan are managed in a way that meets your needs.

Proceedings for the Sale of Real Property in Murray Utah

Proceedings for the Sale of Real Property in Murray, Utah

This document outlines the proceedings for the sale of real property located in Murray, Utah. This also applies to the sale of probate real estate as well. All parties involved in the sale of the property must adhere to the following guidelines and procedures.

1. The seller must provide a valid deed to the property, along with any other necessary documents, to the buyer.

2. The buyer must provide proof of funds to the seller prior to the sale.

3. The buyer must conduct a title search to ensure that the property is free and clear of any liens or encumbrances.

4. The buyer must obtain a survey of the property to ensure that the boundaries are accurate.

5. The buyer must obtain a Certificate of Occupancy from the local municipality to ensure that the property is in compliance with all local zoning and building codes.

6. The buyer must obtain a copy of the deed from the county recorder’s office.

7. The buyer must obtain a copy of the title insurance policy from the title company.

8. The buyer must obtain a copy of the closing statement from the title company.

9. The buyer must sign all necessary documents and pay all closing costs.

10. The seller must sign all necessary documents and pay all closing costs.

11. The buyer must provide proof of insurance to the seller prior to the sale.

12. The buyer must provide proof of payment to the seller prior to the sale.

13. The buyer must provide proof of occupancy to the seller prior to the sale.

14. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary permits to the seller prior to the sale.

15. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary inspections to the seller prior to the sale.

16. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary repairs to the seller prior to the sale.

17. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary warranties to the seller prior to the sale.

18. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary escrow accounts to the seller prior to the sale.

19. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary financing to the seller prior to the sale.

20. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary taxes to the seller prior to the sale.

21. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary assessments to the seller prior to the sale.

22. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary transfer fees to the seller prior to the sale.

23. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary title insurance to the seller prior to the sale.

24. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary closing costs to the seller prior to the sale.

25. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary deed restrictions to the seller prior to the sale.

26. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary easements to the seller prior to the sale.

27. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary covenants to the seller prior to the sale.

28. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary liens to the seller prior to the sale.

29. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary encumbrances to the seller prior to the sale.

30. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary zoning regulations to the seller prior to the sale.

31. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary building codes to the seller prior to the sale.

32. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary environmental regulations to the seller prior to the sale.

33. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary permits to the seller prior to the sale.

34. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary inspections to the seller prior to the sale.

35. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary repairs to the seller prior to the sale.

36. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary warranties to the seller prior to the sale.

37. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary escrow accounts to the seller prior to the sale.

38. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary financing to the seller prior to the sale.

39. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary taxes to the seller prior to the sale.

40. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary assessments to the seller prior to the sale.

41. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary transfer fees to the seller prior to the sale.

42. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary title insurance to the seller prior to the sale.

43. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary closing costs to the seller prior to the sale.

44. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary deed restrictions to the seller prior to the sale.

45. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary easements to the seller prior to the sale.

46. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary covenants to the seller prior to the sale.

47. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary liens to the seller prior to the sale.

48. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary encumbrances to the seller prior to the sale.

49. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary zoning regulations to the seller prior to the sale.

50. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary building codes to the seller prior to the sale.

51. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary environmental regulations to the seller prior to the sale.

52. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary permits to the seller prior to the sale.

53. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary inspections to the seller prior to the sale.

54. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary repairs to the seller prior to the sale.

55. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary warranties to the seller prior to the sale.

56. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary escrow accounts to the seller prior to the sale.

57. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary financing to the seller prior to the sale.

58. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary taxes to the seller prior to the sale.

59. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary assessments to the seller prior to the sale.

60. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary transfer fees to the seller prior to the sale.

61. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary title insurance to the seller prior to the sale.

62. The buyer must provide proof of any necessary closing costs to the seller prior to the sale.

63

Estate Administration Services Offered by Murray, Utah Lawyers

Murray, Utah lawyers offer a variety of estate administration services to help individuals and families manage the estate of a deceased loved one. These services include:

• Probate: Probate is the legal process of administering a deceased person’s estate. This includes identifying and collecting assets, paying debts and taxes, and distributing the remaining assets to the beneficiaries. Murray, Utah lawyers can help guide you through the probate process, ensuring that all legal requirements are met.

• Estate Planning: Estate planning is the process of creating a plan for the management and distribution of your assets after you pass away. Murray, Utah lawyers can help you create a comprehensive estate plan that meets your needs and those of your beneficiaries.

• Trust Administration: Trusts are legal documents that allow you to manage and distribute your assets while you are alive and after you pass away. Murray, Utah lawyers can help you create and administer trusts, ensuring that your wishes are carried out.

• Tax Planning: Estate taxes can be a significant burden on your estate. Murray, Utah lawyers can help you plan for and minimize the amount of taxes owed on your estate.

• Guardianship: If you have minor children or other dependents, you may need to appoint a guardian to manage their affairs. Murray, Utah lawyers can help you create a guardianship plan that meets the needs of your dependents.

Murray, Utah lawyers can provide you with the legal guidance and support you need to manage the estate of a deceased loved one. With their help, you can ensure that your wishes are carried out and that your beneficiaries are taken care of.

Probate Election and Disclaimer in Murray UT

Probate is a legal process that is used to transfer the assets of a deceased person to their heirs. In Murray, Utah, probate is handled by the Third District Court. The court oversees the process of determining the validity of a will, appointing an executor, and distributing the assets of the deceased.

In Murray, Utah, the probate process begins with the filing of a petition for probate. This petition must be filed with the court and must include the name of the deceased, the date of death, and the names of the heirs. The court will then appoint an executor to oversee the probate process. The executor is responsible for collecting the assets of the deceased, paying any debts, and distributing the remaining assets to the heirs.

Once the executor has been appointed, the court will hold an election to determine who will be the administrator of the estate. This election is open to all interested parties, including the heirs, creditors, and other interested parties. The court will then appoint the administrator, who will be responsible for managing the estate and distributing the assets to the heirs.

In some cases, a person may choose to disclaim their interest in the estate. This is done by filing a disclaimer with the court. A disclaimer is a legal document that states that the person does not wish to receive any of the assets of the estate. This can be done for a variety of reasons, including if the person does not want to be responsible for the debts of the deceased or if they do not want to be involved in the probate process.

Probate in Murray, Utah is a complex process that requires the assistance of an experienced attorney. An attorney can help guide you through the process and ensure that your rights are protected. They can also help you understand the legal implications of disclaiming your interest in the estate.

Types of Trusts

Trusts are legal arrangements that allow individuals to transfer assets to a third party for the benefit of another person or entity. They are commonly used to protect assets, minimize taxes, and provide for the care of dependents. There are several types of trusts that can be used for different purposes.

Revocable Trusts: A revocable trust is a trust that can be modified or revoked by the grantor at any time. This type of trust is often used to manage assets during the grantor’s lifetime and to provide for the distribution of assets after death. The grantor retains control over the trust assets and can change the terms of the trust at any time.

Irrevocable Trusts: An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be modified or revoked by the grantor. This type of trust is often used to protect assets from creditors and to minimize taxes. The grantor gives up control over the trust assets and cannot change the terms of the trust.

Living Trusts: A living trust is a trust that is created during the grantor’s lifetime. This type of trust is often used to manage assets during the grantor’s lifetime and to provide for the distribution of assets after death. The grantor retains control over the trust assets and can change the terms of the trust at any time.

Testamentary Trusts: A testamentary trust is a trust that is created upon the death of the grantor. This type of trust is often used to manage assets after death and to provide for the distribution of assets to beneficiaries. The grantor does not retain control over the trust assets and cannot change the terms of the trust.

Charitable Trusts: A charitable trust is a trust that is created for the benefit of a charitable organization. This type of trust is often used to provide financial support to a charitable organization and to minimize taxes. The grantor does not retain control over the trust assets and cannot change the terms of the trust.

Special Needs Trusts: A special needs trust is a trust that is created for the benefit of an individual with special needs. This type of trust is often used to provide financial support to an individual with special needs and to protect assets from being used to pay for medical expenses. The grantor does not retain control over the trust assets and cannot change the terms of the trust.

Steps Involved in the Probate Process in Murray, Utah

The probate process in Murray, Utah is a legal process that is used to settle the estate of a deceased person. It involves the distribution of assets to the rightful heirs and creditors, as well as the payment of any taxes or debts that may be owed. The process can be complex and time-consuming, but it is necessary to ensure that the deceased’s wishes are carried out.

The following steps are involved in the probate process in Murray, Utah:

1. File the Petition: The first step in the probate process is to file a petition with the court. This petition must include the name of the deceased, the date of death, and the names of the heirs and creditors.

2. Appoint an Executor: The court will appoint an executor to oversee the probate process. The executor is responsible for gathering the assets of the deceased, paying any debts or taxes, and distributing the assets to the heirs.

3. Notify Creditors: The executor must notify all creditors of the deceased’s estate. This is done by publishing a notice in a local newspaper.

4. Collect Assets: The executor must collect all of the assets of the deceased, including bank accounts, real estate, and other property.

5. Pay Debts and Taxes: The executor must pay any debts or taxes that are owed by the deceased. This includes any outstanding medical bills, credit card bills, or other debts.

6. Distribute Assets: After all debts and taxes have been paid, the executor must distribute the remaining assets to the heirs. This is done according to the wishes of the deceased, as stated in the will.

7. Close the Estate: Once all assets have been distributed, the executor must file a final report with the court. This report must include a list of all assets, debts, and taxes that were paid. The court will then issue an order closing the estate.

The probate process in Murray, Utah can be complex and time-consuming. It is important to seek the advice of an experienced attorney to ensure that the process is handled properly.

Accounting in Probate

Probate is the legal process of administering the estate of a deceased person. This process involves the collection and distribution of the deceased person’s assets, payment of any debts, and the distribution of any remaining assets to the beneficiaries. Accounting is an important part of the probate process, as it helps to ensure that all assets are accounted for and that the estate is properly administered.

The first step in the accounting process is to identify all of the assets of the deceased person. This includes any real estate, bank accounts, investments, and other assets. Once all of the assets have been identified, the executor of the estate must determine the value of each asset. This is typically done by obtaining appraisals or other professional valuations.

Once the value of the assets has been determined, the executor must then determine the liabilities of the estate. This includes any outstanding debts, taxes, or other obligations. The executor must then determine the net worth of the estate by subtracting the liabilities from the assets.

The executor must then prepare an inventory of all of the assets and liabilities of the estate. This inventory must be filed with the court and is used to ensure that all assets and liabilities are accounted for.

Once the inventory has been filed, the executor must then prepare a final accounting of the estate. This accounting must include all of the assets and liabilities of the estate, as well as any distributions that have been made to the beneficiaries. The final accounting must be filed with the court and is used to ensure that all assets and liabilities have been properly accounted for and that the estate has been properly administered.

Accounting is an important part of the probate process and is necessary to ensure that all assets and liabilities are properly accounted for and that the estate is properly administered. It is important to work with a qualified accountant to ensure that all of the accounting requirements are met and that the estate is properly administered.

Probate Distribution Process

The probate distribution process is the legal process of distributing a deceased person’s estate to their heirs. This process is overseen by the court and involves a variety of steps.

The first step is to open a probate case. This is done by filing a petition with the court. The petition must include information about the deceased person’s assets, debts, and heirs. The court will then appoint an executor or administrator to oversee the probate process.

The next step is to identify and locate the deceased person’s assets. This includes bank accounts, real estate, investments, and other property. The executor or administrator will need to collect all of the assets and determine their value.

The third step is to pay off any debts or taxes owed by the deceased person. This includes any outstanding credit card bills, medical bills, or other debts. The executor or administrator will need to contact creditors and make arrangements to pay off the debts.

The fourth step is to distribute the assets to the heirs. This is done according to the terms of the deceased person’s will or, if there is no will, according to state law. The executor or administrator will need to contact the heirs and make arrangements to transfer the assets.

The final step is to close the probate case. This is done by filing a final report with the court. The report must include information about the assets that were distributed and any debts that were paid. Once the court approves the report, the probate case is closed and the estate is distributed.

The probate distribution process can be a complicated and time-consuming process. It is important to work with an experienced attorney to ensure that the process is handled properly and that the deceased person’s wishes are carried out.

Why You Should Hire a Probate Lawyer to Help You

When a loved one passes away, the process of probate can be a difficult and confusing time. Probate is the legal process of administering the estate of a deceased person, including the distribution of assets to beneficiaries and creditors. It is important to understand the complexities of probate law and the various steps involved in the process. Hiring a probate lawyer can help ensure that the process is handled properly and efficiently.

A probate lawyer is an experienced legal professional who specializes in the laws and procedures related to probate. They can provide invaluable assistance in navigating the complexities of the probate process. A probate lawyer can help you understand the legal requirements of the process, as well as the various options available to you. They can also provide advice on how to best manage the estate and ensure that all assets are distributed according to the wishes of the deceased.

A probate lawyer can also help you protect your rights and interests throughout the process. They can help you understand the various legal documents involved in the process, such as wills and trusts, and ensure that they are properly executed. They can also help you resolve any disputes that may arise during the process, such as disagreements between beneficiaries or creditors.

Finally, a probate lawyer can provide invaluable assistance in the event of a dispute or challenge to the estate. They can help you defend your rights and interests in court, if necessary.

Hiring a probate lawyer can help ensure that the process of administering an estate is handled properly and efficiently. They can provide invaluable assistance in understanding the legal requirements of the process, as well as protecting your rights and interests throughout the process. If you are facing the difficult task of administering an estate, it is important to consider hiring a probate lawyer to help you.

Areas We Serve

We serve individuals and businesses in the following locations:

Salt Lake City Utah
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Probate Lawyer Murray Utah Consultation

When you need help from a Probate Lawyer in Murray Utah call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Murray, Utah

About Murray, Utah

Murray is a city situated on the Wasatch Front in the core of Salt Lake Valley in the U.S. state of Utah. Named for territorial governor Eli Murray, it is the state's fourteenth largest city. According to the 2020 census, Murray had a population of 50,637. Murray shares borders with Taylorsville, Holladay, South Salt Lake and West Jordan, Utah. Once teeming with heavy industry, Murray's industrial sector now has little trace and has been replaced by major mercantile sectors. Known for its central location in Salt Lake County, Murray has been called the Hub of Salt Lake County. Unlike most of its neighboring communities, Murray operates its own police, fire, power, water, library, and parks and recreation departments and has its own school district. While maintaining many of its own services, Murray has one of the lowest city tax rates in the state.

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Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah

“Secure Your Business’s Future with Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah”

Introduction

Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah is a law firm that specializes in helping business owners plan for the future of their business. Our team of experienced attorneys provides comprehensive legal advice and services to help business owners protect their assets and ensure their business’s success. We understand the complexities of business succession planning and can help you create a plan that meets your needs and goals. Whether you are looking to transfer ownership, protect your business from creditors, or plan for the future of your business, our team of experienced attorneys can help. We are committed to providing our clients with the highest quality legal services and advice.

What is Business Succession and Business Law?

How to Find the Best Business Succession Lawyer in Bountiful UT

Finding the best business succession lawyer in Bountiful, UT can be a daunting task. However, with the right research and preparation, you can find the perfect lawyer for your needs. Here are some tips to help you find the best business succession lawyer in Bountiful, UT:

1. Ask for referrals. Talk to other business owners in the area and ask them for referrals to business succession lawyers they have used in the past. This is a great way to get an idea of who is reputable and experienced in the field.

2. Research online. Look for reviews and ratings of business succession lawyers in Bountiful, UT. This will give you an idea of who is highly rated and who may not be the best fit for your needs.

3. Schedule a consultation. Once you have narrowed down your list of potential lawyers, schedule a consultation with each one. This will give you the opportunity to ask questions and get a better understanding of their experience and qualifications.

4. Ask questions. During the consultation, make sure to ask questions about their experience in business succession law, their fees, and any other relevant information. This will help you make an informed decision about who to hire.

By following these tips, you can find the best business succession lawyer in Bountiful, UT for your needs. With the right research and preparation, you can ensure that you are working with a qualified and experienced lawyer who can help you with your business succession needs.

The Benefits of Estate Planning with a Business Succession Lawyer in Bountiful UT

Estate planning is an important part of financial planning for individuals and businesses alike. A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you create an estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets. Here are some of the benefits of estate planning with a business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT.

1. Tax Planning: A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you create an estate plan that minimizes your tax liability. They can help you structure your estate in a way that reduces the amount of taxes you owe and ensures that your heirs receive the maximum benefit from your estate.

2. Asset Protection: A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you create an estate plan that protects your assets from creditors and other potential liabilities. They can help you create trusts and other legal documents that ensure your assets are protected and passed on to your heirs.

3. Estate Administration: A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you manage the administration of your estate. They can help you create a will, appoint an executor, and ensure that your wishes are carried out after you pass away.

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4. Business Succession Planning: A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you create a plan for the future of your business. They can help you create a plan for the transfer of ownership and management of your business to ensure that it continues to be successful after you are gone.

Estate planning is an important part of financial planning for individuals and businesses alike. A business succession lawyer in Bountiful UT can help you create an estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets. With their help, you can ensure that your wishes are carried out after you pass away and that your heirs receive the maximum benefit from your estate.

What to Expect When Working with a Business Succession Lawyer in Bountiful Utah

When working with a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah, you can expect a comprehensive approach to your legal needs. Your lawyer will work with you to understand your business goals and objectives, and will provide you with the legal advice and guidance necessary to ensure that your business succession plan is successful.

Your lawyer will begin by gathering information about your business, including its structure, assets, liabilities, and any other relevant information. This information will be used to create a comprehensive business succession plan that meets your needs and goals. Your lawyer will also review any existing contracts or agreements that may be relevant to your business succession plan.

Once your lawyer has gathered all the necessary information, they will work with you to develop a plan that meets your needs. This plan will include the transfer of ownership, the division of assets, and the distribution of profits. Your lawyer will also provide advice on tax implications and other legal matters related to your business succession plan.

Your lawyer will also provide guidance on the best way to handle any disputes that may arise during the process. They will work with you to ensure that all parties involved are satisfied with the outcome of the business succession plan.

Finally, your lawyer will provide you with ongoing support and advice throughout the process. They will be available to answer any questions you may have and provide guidance as needed.

By working with a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah, you can be sure that your business succession plan is handled in a professional and efficient manner. Your lawyer will provide you with the legal advice and guidance necessary to ensure that your business succession plan is successful.

How to Choose the Right Business Succession Lawyer for Your Needs

When it comes to business succession planning, it is important to choose the right lawyer to ensure that your business is properly protected and that your wishes are carried out. Here are some tips to help you choose the right business succession lawyer for your needs.

1. Research: Before you hire a lawyer, it is important to do your research. Look for lawyers who specialize in business succession law and have experience in the area. Check their credentials and read reviews from past clients to get an idea of their level of expertise.

2. Ask Questions: Once you have identified a few potential lawyers, it is important to ask questions to ensure that they are the right fit for your needs. Ask about their experience in business succession law, their fees, and their approach to the process.

3. Get Referrals: Ask your business contacts and colleagues for referrals to lawyers they have used in the past. This can help you narrow down your search and find a lawyer who is experienced and knowledgeable in the area.

4. Meet in Person: Once you have identified a few potential lawyers, it is important to meet with them in person. This will give you an opportunity to get to know them and ask any additional questions you may have.

By following these tips, you can ensure that you choose the right business succession lawyer for your needs. With the right lawyer, you can rest assured that your business is properly protected and that your wishes are carried out.

Understanding the Benefits of Working with a Business Succession Lawyer in Bountiful Utah

Business succession planning is an important part of any business owner’s long-term strategy. It involves planning for the future of the business, including the transfer of ownership and management of the business to the next generation. Working with a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah can help ensure that the transition is smooth and successful.

A business succession lawyer can provide invaluable guidance and advice to business owners as they plan for the future of their business. They can help business owners understand the legal and financial implications of their succession plan, as well as the tax implications. They can also help business owners create a plan that meets their goals and objectives.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the various options available to them when it comes to transferring ownership and management of the business. They can help business owners understand the different types of business entities, such as corporations, limited liability companies, and partnerships. They can also help business owners understand the different types of ownership structures, such as sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.

A business succession lawyer can also help business owners understand the different types of estate planning tools available to them. These tools can help business owners protect their assets and ensure that their business is passed on to the next generation in the most efficient and effective manner.

Finally, a business succession lawyer can help business owners understand the different types of legal documents that are necessary to ensure that their succession plan is properly executed. These documents can include wills, trusts, and other legal documents that are necessary to ensure that the business is transferred in accordance with the wishes of the business owner.

Working with a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah can help business owners ensure that their succession plan is successful and that their business is passed on to the next generation in the most efficient and effective manner. By working with a qualified lawyer, business owners can ensure that their business is properly protected and that their succession plan is properly executed.

Why you Need a Business Succession Attorney to Help You

Business succession planning is an important part of any business owner’s long-term strategy. It involves making decisions about the future of the business, such as who will take over the business when the current owner retires or passes away. It is important to have a plan in place to ensure that the business continues to operate smoothly and that the owner’s wishes are respected.

A business succession attorney can help business owners create a plan that meets their needs and protects their interests. An attorney can provide advice on the legal aspects of succession planning, such as the transfer of ownership, the division of assets, and the tax implications of the transition. An attorney can also help business owners create a plan that is tailored to their specific situation and goals.

A business succession attorney can also help business owners navigate the complexities of the legal process. An attorney can help ensure that all documents are properly drafted and filed, and that all legal requirements are met. An attorney can also provide guidance on the best way to structure the transition, such as whether to transfer ownership through a sale or a gift.

Finally, a business succession attorney can provide valuable advice on how to protect the business’s assets and ensure that the owner’s wishes are respected. An attorney can help business owners create a plan that will ensure that the business continues to operate smoothly and that the owner’s wishes are respected.

Having a business succession attorney on your side can help ensure that your business succession plan is successful. An attorney can provide valuable advice and guidance on the legal aspects of succession planning, as well as help you create a plan that meets your needs and protects your interests.

Q&A

1. What is a business succession lawyer?

A business succession lawyer is a legal professional who specializes in helping business owners plan for the future of their business. They can help with the legal aspects of succession planning, such as drafting wills, trusts, and other documents to ensure that the business is passed on to the right people in the event of the owner’s death or disability.

2. What services does a business succession lawyer provide?

A business succession lawyer can provide a variety of services, including helping business owners create a succession plan, drafting wills and trusts, and providing advice on tax and estate planning. They can also help with the transfer of ownership, such as helping to negotiate the sale of the business or helping to transfer ownership to family members.

3. What should I look for in a business succession lawyer?

When looking for a business succession lawyer, it is important to find someone who is experienced in the area of business succession planning. You should also look for someone who is knowledgeable about the laws in your state and who is familiar with the specific needs of your business.

4. How much does a business succession lawyer cost?

The cost of a business succession lawyer will vary depending on the complexity of the case and the services provided. Generally, you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $500 per hour for their services.

5. What is the best way to find a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah?

The best way to find a business succession lawyer in Bountiful, Utah is to ask for referrals from friends, family, or colleagues who have used a lawyer in the past. You can also search online for lawyers in the area and read reviews to get an idea of their experience and reputation.

6. What should I expect during my first meeting with a business succession lawyer?

During your first meeting with a business succession lawyer, you should expect to discuss your goals and objectives for the business, as well as any legal issues that may arise. The lawyer will also ask questions about the business and its operations in order to better understand your needs.

7. What documents should I bring to my first meeting with a business succession lawyer?

When meeting with a business succession lawyer, it is important to bring any relevant documents, such as business plans, financial statements, and tax returns. You should also bring any documents related to the ownership of the business, such as deeds, titles, and contracts.

Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah Consultation

When you need legal help from a Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

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Business Succession Lawyer Bountiful Utah

Bountiful, Utah

About Bountiful, Utah

Bountiful is a city in Davis County, Utah. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 42,552, a three percent increase over the 2000 figure of 41,301. The city grew rapidly during the suburb growth of the late 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s and was Davis County's largest city until 1985, when it was surpassed by Layton. Bountiful is Utah's 15th-largest city.

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Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

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Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Hiring Attorney Jeremy Eveland to draft a business succession plan in Orem, Utah is a wise decision for anyone looking for experienced legal counsel. With many years of experience in business law, Jeremy is well-versed in the nuances of business succession planning and has a deep understanding of the legal process. He works diligently with clients to ensure they understand their options and can make informed decisions. Jeremy has extensive experience in the Orem area and is a member of the Utah State Bar.

This article is part of business succession law, which is a subsection of business law.

When business disputes happen, he is an effective working with the mediator, and assisting parties to come to an agreement that meets their mutual needs. He is also a skilled litigator, having handled a variety of business cases in his career. He is committed to providing ethical and legal advice to the clients he serves.

Orem Utah Business Lawyer

For those looking for probate, estate planning, or estate administration lawyers, Jeremy is a solid choice. He is knowledgeable in the areas of estate planning, probate, and liability, and is experienced in creating partnership agreements, buy-sell agreements, and other documents related to business succession planning. He is well-versed in the tax implications of estate planning and can provide advice on how to minimize taxes and maximize estate value.

Business Formation Attorney Orem UT

Jeremy is also well-versed in the process of creating LLCs and other business entities. He can help clients draft the necessary paperwork, such as partnership agreements and operating agreements, to ensure the business is properly formed and all parties involved are properly protected. He can also provide legal advice on the ownership stakes of each business partner and the ownership interests of each party.

Jeremy is committed to providing the best legal services and solutions to his clients. He offers free consultations and is available to answer any questions clients might have. He is also available to discuss mediation, if necessary, to reach a settlement agreement between parties.

Utah Business Entity

When we talk about business entities, we are referring to the type or structure of a business as opposed to what the business does. How a business is structured affects how taxes are paid, liabilities are determined, and of course, paperwork. Business entities—organizations created by one or more people to carry on a trade—are usually created at the state level, often by filing documents with a state agency such as the Secretary of State.

Business entities are subject to taxation and must file a tax return.

For federal income tax purposes, some business entities are, by default, considered not to be separate from their owner. Such is the case with sole proprietors and single-member limited liability companies. The income and deductions related to these entities are normally reported on the same tax return as the owner of the business. The IRS calls these disregarded entities because it “disregards” the separate name and structure of the business. However, a disregarded entity can choose to be treated as if it were a separate entity. This is done by making an Entity Classification Election using Form 8832 and filing this form with the IRS. The purpose of this form is to choose a classification other than the default classification provided by federal tax laws.

Confusion Over Business and tax Terms

Distinguishing between the actual organizational structure created under state law and the tax classification can cause confusion, especially if the same words are used for both concepts. Colloquially, when accountants talk about “entities” or “entity returns,” they are referring to tax returns other than for individual people.
In simplest terms, a business entity is an organization created by an individual or individuals to conduct business, engage in a trade, or partake in similar activities. There are various types of business entities—sole proprietorship, partnership, LLC, corporation, etc.—and a business’s entity type dictates both the structure of that organization and how that company is taxed.

When starting a business, one of the first things you want to do is choose the structure of your company—in other words, choose a business entity type. This decision will have important legal and financial implications for your business. The amount of taxes you have to pay depends on your business entity choice, as does the ease with which you can get a small business loan or raise money from investors. Plus, if someone sues your business, your business entity structure determines your risk exposure. State governments in the U.S. recognize more than a dozen different types of business entities, but the average small business owner chooses between these six: sole proprietorship, general partnership, limited partnership (LP), limited liability company (LLC), C-corporation, and S-corporation.

Business Succession Lawyer Free Consultation

When you need a business succession attorney, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Areas We Serve

We serve businesses and business owners for succession planning in the following locations:

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer St. George Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Provo Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Sandy Utah

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Types of Business Entities in Utah

As we mentioned above, at a very basic level, a business entity simply means an organization that has been formed to conduct business. However, the type of entity you choose for your business determines how your company is structured and taxed. For example, by definition, a sole proprietorship must be owned and operated by a single owner. If your business entity type is a partnership, on the other hand, this means there are two or more owners. Similarly, if you establish a business as a sole proprietorship, this means for tax purposes, you’re a pass-through entity (the taxes are passed onto the business owner). Conversely, if you establish your business as a corporation, this means the business exists separately from its owners, and therefore, pays separate taxes. Generally, to actually establish your business’s entity structure, you’ll register in the state where your business is located. With all of this in mind, the chart below summarizes the various entity types business owners can choose from:

Business Entity Type

• Sole proprietorship: Unincorporated business with one owner or jointly owned by a married couple
• General partnership: Unincorporated business with two or more owners
• Limited partnership: Registered business composed of active, general partners and passive, limited partners
• Limited liability partnership: Partnership structure that shields all partners from personal liability
• Limited liability limited partnership: Type of limited partnership with some liability protection for general partners
• Limited liability company (LLC): Registered business with limited liability for all members
• Professional limited liability company: LLC structure for professionals, such as doctors and accountants
• C-corporation: Incorporated business composed of shareholders, directors, and officers
• S-corporation: Incorporated business that is taxed as a pass-through entity
• Professional corporation: Corporate structure for professionals, such as doctors and accountants
• B-corporation: For-profit corporation that is certified for meeting social and environmental standards
• Nonprofit: Corporation formed primarily to benefit the public interest rather than earn a profit
• Estate: Separate legal entity created to distribute an individual’s property after death
• Municipality: Corporate status given to a city or town
• Cooperative: Private organization owned and controlled by a group of individuals for their own benefit

As you can see, there are numerous types of business entities; however, most business owners will choose from the six most common options: sole proprietorship, general partnership, limited partnership, LLC, C-corporation, or S-corporation. Below, we’ve explained each of these popular business entity types, as well as the pros and cons of choosing each particular structure for your company.

Sole Proprietorship

A sole proprietorship is the simplest business entity, with one person (or a married couple) as the sole owner and operator of the business. If you launch a new business and are the only owner, you are automatically a sole proprietorship under the law. There’s no need to register a sole proprietorship with the state, though you might need local business licenses or permits depending on your industry. Freelancers, consultants, and other service professionals commonly work as sole proprietors, but it’s also a viable option for more established businesses, such as retail stores, with one person at the helm.

Pros of Sole Proprietorship

• Easy to start (no need to register your business with the state).
• No corporate formalities or paperwork requirements, such as meeting minutes, bylaws, etc.
• You can deduct most business losses on your personal tax return.
• Tax filings is easy—simply fill out and attach Schedule C-Profit or Loss From Business to your personal income tax return.

Cons of Sole Proprietorship

• As the only owner, you’re personally responsible for all of the business’s debts and liabilities—someone who wins a lawsuit against your business can take your personal assets (your car, personal bank accounts, even your home in some situations).
• There’s no real separation between you and the business, so it’s more difficult to get a business loan and raise money (lenders and investors prefer LLCs or corporations).
• It’s harder to build business credit without a registered business entity.
Sole proprietorships are by far the most popular type of business structure in the U.S. because of how easy they are to set up. There’s a lot of overlap between your personal and business finances, which makes it easy to launch and file taxes. The problem is that this same lack of separation can also land you in legal trouble. If a customer, employee, or another third party successfully sues your business, they can take your personal assets. Due to this risk, most sole proprietors eventually convert their business to an LLC or corporation.

General Partnership (GP)

Partnerships share many similarities with sole proprietorships—the key difference is that the business has two or more owners. There are two kinds of partnerships: general partnerships (GPs) and limited partnerships (LPs). In a general partnership, all partners actively manage the business and share in the profits and losses. Like a sole proprietorship, a general partnership is the default mode of ownership for multiple-owner businesses—there’s no need to register a general partnership with the state. I’ve written about the Utah Uniform Partnership Act previously.

Pros of General Partnership

• Easy to start (no need to register your business with the state).
• No corporate formalities or paperwork requirements, such as meeting minutes, bylaws, etc.
• You don’t need to absorb all the business losses on your own because the partners divide the profits and losses.
• Owners can deduct most business losses on their personal tax returns.

Cons of General Partnership

• Each owner is personally liable for the business’s debts and other liabilities.
• In some states, each partner may be personally liable for another partner’s negligent actions or behavior (this is called joint and several liability).
• Disputes among partners can unravel the business (though drafting a solid partnership agreement can help you avoid this).
• It’s more difficult to get a business loan, land a big client, and build business credit without a registered business entity.

Most people form partnerships to lower the risk of starting a business. Instead of going all-in on your own, having multiple people sharing the struggles and successes can be very helpful, especially in the early years. This being said, if you do go this route, it’s very important to choose the right partner or partners. Disputes can seriously limit a business’s growth, and many state laws hold each partner fully responsible for the actions of the others. For example, if one partner enters into a contract and then violates one of the terms, the third party can personally sue any or all of the partners.

Limited Partnership (LP)

Unlike a general partnership, a limited partnership is a registered business entity. To form an LP, therefore, you must file paperwork with the state. In an LP, there are two kinds of partners: those who own, operate, and assume liability for the business (general partners), and those who act only as investors (limited partners, sometimes called “silent partners”). Limited partners don’t have control over business operations and have fewer liabilities. They typically act as investors in the business and also pay fewer taxes because they have a more tangential role in the company.

Pros of Limited Partnership

• An LP is a good option for raising money because investors can serve as limited partners without personal liability.
• General partners get the money they need to operate but maintain authority over business operations.
• Limited partners can leave anytime without dissolving the business partnership.

Cons of Limited Partnership

• General partners are personally responsible for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• More expensive to create than a general partnership and requires a state filing.
• A limited partner may also face personal liability if they inadvertently take too active a role in the business.

Multi-owner businesses that want to raise money from investors often do well as LPs because investors can avoid liability. You might come across yet another business entity structure called a limited liability partnership (LLP). In an LLP, none of the partners have personal liability for the business, but most states only allow law firms, accounting firms, doctor’s offices, and other professional service firms to organize as LLPs. These types of businesses can organize as an LLP to avoid each partner being liable for the other’s actions. For example, if one doctor in a medical practice commits malpractice, having an LLP lets the other doctors avoid liability.

C-Corporation

A C-corporation is an independent legal entity that exists separately from the company’s owners. Shareholders (the owners), a board of directors, and officers have control over the corporation, although one person in a C-corp can fulfill all of these roles, so it is possible to create a corporation where you’re in charge of everything. This being said, with this type of business entity, there are many more regulations and tax laws that the company must comply with. Methods for incorporating, fees, and required forms vary by state.

Pros of C-corporation

• Owners (shareholders) don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• C-corporations are eligible for more tax deductions than any other type of business.
• C-corporation owners pay lower self-employment taxes.
• You have the ability to offer stock options, which can help you raise money in the future.

Cons of C-corporation

• More expensive to create than sole proprietorships and partnerships (the filing fees required to incorporate a business range from $100 to $500 based on which state you’re in).
• C-corporations face double taxation: The company pays taxes on the corporate tax return, and then shareholders pay taxes on dividends on their personal tax returns.
• Owners cannot deduct business losses on their personal tax returns.
• There are a lot of formalities that corporations have to meet, such as holding board and shareholder meetings, keeping meeting minutes, and creating bylaws.
Most small businesses pass over C-corps when deciding how to structure their business, but they can be a good choice as your business grows and you find yourself needing more legal protections. The biggest benefit of a C-corp is limited liability. If someone sues the business, they are limited to taking business assets to cover the judgment—they can’t come after your home, car, or other personal assets. This being said, corporations are a mixed bag from a tax perspective—there are more tax deductions and fewer self-employment taxes, but there’s the possibility of double taxation if you plan to offer dividends. Owners who invest profits back into the business as opposed to taking dividends are more likely to benefit under a corporate structure.

S-Corporation

An S-corporation preserves the limited liability that comes with a C-corporation but is a pass-through entity for tax purposes. This means that, similar to a sole prop or partnership, an S-corp’s profits and losses pass through to the owners’ personal tax returns. There’s no corporate-level taxation for an S-corp.

Pros of S-corporation

• Owners (shareholders) don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• No corporate taxation and no double taxation: An S-corp is a pass-through entity, so the government taxes it much like a sole proprietorship or partnership.

Cons of S-corporation

• Like C-corporations, S-corporations are more expensive to create than both sole proprietorships and partnerships (requires registration with the state).
• There are more limits on issuing stock with S-corps vs. C-corps.
• You still need to comply with corporate formalities, like creating bylaws and holding board and shareholder meetings.
In order to organize as an S-corporation or convert your business to an S-corporation, you have to file IRS form 2553. S-corporations can be a good choice for businesses that want a corporate structure but like the tax flexibility of a sole proprietorship or partnership.

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

A limited liability company takes positive features from each of the other business entity types. Like corporations, LLCs offer limited liability protections. But, LLCs also have less paperwork and ongoing requirements, and in that sense, they are more like sole proprietorships and partnerships. Another big benefit is that you can choose how you want the IRS to tax your LLC. You can elect to have the IRS treat it as a corporation or as a pass-through entity on your taxes.

Pros of LLC

• Owners don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts or liabilities.
• You can choose whether you want your LLC to be taxed as a partnership or as a corporation.
• Not as many corporate formalities compared to an S-corp or C-corp.

Cons of LLC

• It’s more expensive to create an LLC than a sole proprietorship or partnership (requires registration with the state).
LLCs are popular among small business owners, including freelancers, because they combine the best of many worlds: the ease of a sole proprietorship or partnership with the legal protections of a corporation.

At the end of the day, hiring Attorney Jeremy Eveland to draft a business succession plan in Orem, Utah is a wise decision. With his extensive experience, knowledge, and commitment to providing the best legal solutions, clients can be assured that their business succession plan will be drafted with the utmost care and consideration. Jeremy is committed to providing the best legal advice and is available to answer any questions or concerns clients may have. With Jeremy’s help, clients can feel confident in their business succession plan and the future of their business.

Orem, Utah

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Orem, Utah
Orem City Center

Orem City Center
Flag of Orem, Utah

Nickname: 

Family City USA
Location in Utah County and the state of Utah

Location in Utah County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 40°17′56″N 111°41′47″WCoordinates40°17′56″N 111°41′47″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Utah
Settled 1877
Town charter granted May 5, 1919
Named for Walter C. Orem
Government

 
 • Mayor David Young
 • Spokesman Steven Downs
 • City Manager James P. Davidson[2]
Area

 
 • Total 18.57 sq mi (48.10 km2)
 • Land 18.57 sq mi (48.10 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,774 ft (1,455 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 98,129[1]
 • Density 5,267.22/sq mi (2,033.67/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-6 (MDT)
Area codes 385, 801
FIPS code 49-57300[3]
GNIS feature ID 1444110[4]
Website www.orem.org]

Orem is a city in Utah CountyUtah, United States, in the northern part of the state. It is adjacent to ProvoLindon, and Vineyard and is approximately 45 miles (72 km) south of Salt Lake City.

Orem is one of the principal cities of the Provo-Orem, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Utah and Juab counties. The 2020 population was 98,129,[1] while the 2010 population was 88,328[5] making it the fifth-largest city in UtahUtah Valley University is located in Orem.

Orem, Utah

About Orem, Utah

Orem is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States, in the northern part of the state. It is adjacent to Provo, Lindon, and Vineyard and is approximately 45 miles (72 km) south of Salt Lake City.

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