Tag Archives: ascent law llc

Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah, Jeremy Eveland, Lawyer Jeremy Eveland, Jeremy Eveland Utah Attorney, Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah, law, estate, jordan, planning, lawyers, attorney, lawyer, probate, firm, state, clients, attorneys, business, city, divorce, trust, court, office, llc, consultation, dui, assets, years, family, states, tax, utah, matter, children, county, marriage, ascent, services, process, custody, cases, property, questions, wills, trusts, west jordan, lake county, ascent law, ascent law llc, free consultation, estate planning, law firm, legal issues, summary probate, initial consultation, legal problems, ascent law st., utah office ascent, utah office, car wreck, law question, lawyer divorce lawyer, family law attorneys, united states telephone, planning lawyers, same-sex couples, south jordan, estate planning lawyers, lake city, personal injury, same-sex marriage, law office, supreme court, estate planning attorney, real estate, lawyers, estate planning, trust, probate, west jordan, ut, attorney, assets, salt lake county, utah, law firm, utah, tax, jordan, beneficiaries, reputation, salt lake city, martindale-hubbell, lake, personal injury, law, irrevocable trusts, probate services, west jordan, utah, probate lawyer, living will, probate, asset protection, life insurance, will, liquidating, ira, estate tax, trust, income tax, required minimum distributions, advance directive, life insurance policies, personal injury

Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah

“Secure Your Future with Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah”

Introduction

Welcome to Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah. We are a team of experienced attorneys dedicated to helping individuals and families in the West Jordan area with their estate planning needs. Our attorneys have extensive experience in estate planning, probate, trust administration, and other related areas of law. We understand the importance of protecting your assets and providing for your loved ones. We strive to provide our clients with the highest quality legal services and advice. Our goal is to ensure that your estate plan is tailored to your individual needs and goals. We look forward to helping you with all of your estate planning needs.

Exploring the Different Types of Trusts Available in West Jordan Utah

Trusts are an important part of estate planning in West Jordan, Utah. They are a legal arrangement that allows a person to transfer assets to another person or entity for the benefit of a third party. Trusts can be used to protect assets, provide for the care of dependents, and minimize taxes. There are several different types of trusts available in West Jordan, Utah.

Revocable Living Trusts: A revocable living trust is a trust that can be changed or revoked by the grantor at any time. This type of trust is often used to avoid probate and to provide for the care of dependents. The grantor can also name a trustee to manage the trust assets.

Irrevocable Trusts: An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be changed or revoked by the grantor. This type of trust is often used to protect assets from creditors and to minimize taxes. The grantor cannot access the trust assets, and the trustee is responsible for managing the trust assets.

Charitable Trusts: A charitable trust is a trust that is used to benefit a charitable organization. This type of trust can be used to provide for the care of dependents, to provide for charitable causes, or to minimize taxes.

Special Needs Trusts: A special needs trust is a trust that is used to provide for the care of a disabled individual. This type of trust can be used to provide for the care of dependents, to provide for medical expenses, or to minimize taxes.

Spendthrift Trusts: A spendthrift trust is a trust that is used to protect assets from creditors. This type of trust can be used to provide for the care of dependents, to protect assets from creditors, or to minimize taxes.

By understanding the different types of trusts available in West Jordan, Utah, individuals can make informed decisions about their estate planning needs. It is important to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to ensure that the trust is properly drafted and administered.

How to Protect Your Assets with Estate Planning in West Jordan Utah

Estate planning is an important part of protecting your assets and ensuring that your wishes are carried out after you pass away. In West Jordan, Utah, there are several steps you can take to ensure that your assets are protected and that your wishes are respected.

First, you should create a will. A will is a legal document that outlines how you want your assets to be distributed after you pass away. It can also include instructions for guardianship of any minor children, as well as any other instructions you may have. It is important to have a will in place so that your wishes are respected and your assets are distributed according to your wishes.

Second, you should consider setting up a trust. A trust is a legal entity that can be used to manage and protect your assets. It can be used to provide for your family after you pass away, or to manage assets for a minor child. A trust can also be used to protect assets from creditors or lawsuits.

Third, you should consider setting up a power of attorney. A power of attorney is a legal document that allows you to designate someone to make decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated. This can be a spouse, family member, or trusted friend.

Finally, you should consider setting up a living will. A living will is a legal document that outlines your wishes regarding medical care if you become incapacitated. It can also include instructions for end-of-life care.

By taking these steps, you can ensure that your assets are protected and that your wishes are respected after you pass away. Estate planning is an important part of protecting your assets and ensuring that your wishes are carried out.

What to Know About Summary Probate in West Jordan UT

Summary probate is a simplified probate process available in West Jordan, UT. It is designed to provide a quicker and less expensive way to settle an estate than the traditional probate process. Summary probate is available for estates with a gross value of $100,000 or less, excluding the value of the decedent’s homestead.

In order to qualify for summary probate, the decedent must have died with a valid will in place. The will must name an executor, and the executor must be willing and able to serve. The executor must also be a resident of Utah.

Once the executor has been appointed, they must file a petition for summary probate with the court. The petition must include a copy of the will, a list of the decedent’s assets and liabilities, and a list of the heirs and beneficiaries. The executor must also provide proof of death, such as a death certificate.

Once the petition is filed, the court will review it and determine whether summary probate is appropriate. If the court approves the petition, it will issue an order granting summary probate. The executor can then proceed to settle the estate according to the terms of the will.

Summary probate is a useful tool for settling smaller estates quickly and efficiently. It can save time and money, and provide peace of mind to the executor and heirs. However, it is important to note that summary probate is not available for all estates. It is important to consult with an experienced attorney to determine if summary probate is the right option for your situation.

Exploring the Different Types of Wills Available in West Jordan Utah

When it comes to estate planning, having a will is an important part of the process. A will is a legal document that outlines how a person’s assets and property should be distributed after their death. In West Jordan, Utah, there are several different types of wills available to meet the needs of individuals and families.

The most common type of will is a simple will. This type of will is used to distribute assets and property to beneficiaries in a straightforward manner. It can also be used to name an executor, who is responsible for carrying out the wishes of the deceased. Simple wills are typically used by individuals who have a relatively small estate and do not need to make complex arrangements.

Another type of will available in West Jordan is a living will. This type of will is used to outline a person’s wishes regarding medical care and end-of-life decisions. It can also be used to appoint a healthcare proxy, who is responsible for making medical decisions on behalf of the deceased.

A trust will is another type of will available in West Jordan. This type of will is used to create a trust, which is a legal entity that holds and manages assets for the benefit of a beneficiary. Trusts can be used to manage assets for minors, provide for long-term care, or minimize taxes.

Finally, a pour-over will is a type of will that is used in conjunction with a trust. This type of will is used to transfer any assets that are not already in the trust to the trust upon the death of the testator.

When it comes to estate planning, having a will is an important part of the process. In West Jordan, Utah, there are several different types of wills available to meet the needs of individuals and families. These include simple wills, living wills, trust wills, and pour-over wills. It is important to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to determine which type of will is best for your situation.

Understanding the Benefits of an Irrevocable Trust in West Jordan UT

An irrevocable trust is a powerful estate planning tool that can provide numerous benefits to individuals in West Jordan, UT. An irrevocable trust is a legal arrangement in which a person, known as the grantor, transfers assets to a trustee to be held and managed for the benefit of a designated beneficiary. Once the trust is established, the grantor cannot make any changes to the trust or revoke it.

Here’s how potential rate changes could affect your wealth transfer plans. Some popular estate planning strategies rely on interest rates to calculate the value of assets that are gifted or loaned to a family member or a trust.

When rates are relatively low, interfamily loans and GRATs are often more effective.

High-interest-rate environment

Estate planning in a high-interest-rate environment entails reducing the actuarial value of a future gift that would otherwise be taxable. The higher the prevailing rate, the more beneficial these strategies will be. Qualified Personal Residence Trusts (QPRT) and Charitable Remainder Trusts (CRT) are two common techniques that we’ll consider in turn.

As rates continue to rise, families may want to consider techniques like qualified personal residence trusts and charitable remainder trusts that are more effective in higher-interest rate environments.

The Federal Reserve has raised interest rates 5 times in 2022, with the potential for more increases on the horizon. For individuals and families interested in passing assets to the next generation, these moves could affect the tax efficiency of certain popular wealth transfer strategies, explains Michael Christy, vice president, advanced planning at Fidelity—in some cases for the better and in some for the worse.

Because it seems possible that rates will continue to rise, it’s worthwhile to consider how different estate planning strategies may be affected, now and going forward. Since these techniques are complex, you’ll want to discuss with your tax attorney and financial professional which may be best suited for your family’s situation.

Intrafamily loan

How it works: An intrafamily loan is a private loan between family members. The loans can be used to help children purchase a new home, for example, at potentially more favorable interest rates than are commercially available. This strategy can also be leveraged as a wealth transfer technique. That’s because any appreciation on the loaned funds that exceeds the interest rate charged isn’t included in the lender’s estate. “For estate tax purposes, the value of the asset being loaned is frozen and the appreciation passes to the beneficiary free of estate and gift tax.”

Why interest rates matter: To avoid an intrafamily loan being treated as a gift, the IRS requires, among other formalities, that a minimum amount of interest be charged. Accordingly, the IRS sets the minimum interest rates for intrafamily loans, generally at a rate well below what borrowers would find at a commercial lender. Known as the Applicable Federal Rate (AFR), it is based on the prior 30-day average market yields of corresponding US treasury obligations, such as T-bills. You can find current rates on the IRS website. In September 2022, the minimum interest rate that must be charged for loans that will last between 3 and 9 years was 2.93%. During the term of the loan, any income and growth the borrower receives on the loan assets above the AFR rate isn’t considered as part of the lender’s estate.
“As interest rates increase, AFRs will increase as well, which means that this technique could become less effective.”

Although interest rates had been sitting at historically low levels since 2010, they have begun to rise as inflation moves higher. Each month, the Internal Revenue Service publishes two important rates that impact certain estate planning techniques: the Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) and the Section 7520 rate. The AFR reflects the minimum interest rate to be charged for loans between related parties in order to avoid a gift tax. The Section 7520 rate is used to calculate annual payments that must be made to the beneficial parties when utilizing various techniques for financial products like annuities. These rates are calculated based on the yields of government debt instruments and the target federal funds rate.

Grantor retained annuity trust (GRAT)

How it works: A grantor places certain assets—generally those with the potential to highly appreciate, such as shares of a business—in a trust. In return, the grantor receives a stream of payments (in the form of an annual distribution) for the trust’s duration (the “retained annuity”). If structured properly, assets that remain in the trust at the end of the trust term can pass on to heirs, potentially free of any gift tax.

Why interest rates matter: The amount of interest required to be returned to the grantor is calculated using what’s known as the §7520 rate or hurdle rate, which is 120% of the midterm AFR. Any appreciation of the assets in the GRAT in excess of the hurdle rate passes to the beneficiaries outside the grantor’s taxable estate. “The §7520 is fixed for the duration of the GRAT, so this strategy is more likely to be successful when rates are relatively low.”

Intentionally defective grantor trust (IDGT)

How it works: This somewhat oddly named strategy is similar to a GRAT, except that the grantor generally makes an initial lump sum gift to the trust, and then can subsequently sell or loan additional assets to the trust. The transfer of assets to an IDGT is irrevocable and for estate tax purposes are treated as no longer part of the grantor’s estate. However, the trust is structured so that the grantor is still taxed on the trust’s income. The result is a trust that is intentionally “defective” for income tax purposes, (hence the “defective” part of the name) to enable trust assets to appreciate without the liability of income taxes.

Why interest rates matter: When assets are lent to an IDGT, it works similarly to an intrafamily loan, except instead of loaning assets to an individual, the grantor makes the loan to the trust. In return, the grantor receives an interest-bearing promissory note, payable by the trust.

If assets are sold to the IDGT by the grantor, it is structured as an installment sale with the grantor taking back an interest-bearing promissory note, also payable by the trust. In both cases, the rate on the note is determined by the AFR. “The lower the AFR, the more likely it is that the assets placed in the IDGT will appreciate in value at a faster pace than the AFR rate.”

Charitable lead annuity trust

How it works: For families who might want to provide financial support to a charity, a charitable lead annuity trust (CLAT), allows a grantor to direct a stream of payments generated from trust assets to one or more charities. When the grantor dies or a certain fixed term of years is reached, the assets in the trust are distributed to non-charitable beneficiaries—such as family members. A CLAT is often set up for a certain number of years, and, depending on the type of CLAT, the grantor may be eligible to take an immediate tax deduction when the trust is funded.

Why interest rates matter: At the time the assets are transferred to the CLAT, the present value of the remainder to the family is a taxable gift, thereby using a portion of the grantors’ lifetime estate and gift tax exemption. Like with a GRAT, the IRS §7520 rate is used to determine the value of the gift—so the lower §7520 rate, the lower the value of the gift, and the less lifetime estate and gift tax exemption is consumed.

If rates continue to rise

There are certain strategies that tend to be more effective in a higher interest rate environment.

Qualified personal residence trust (QPRT): This strategy allows a homeowner to remove the home from their estate by transferring ownership to a trust, while retaining the right to live in the property. When the term of the trust ends, the home is passed to the beneficiary. The transfer of the home to the QPRT is treated as a gift, but the value of the gift is reduced by the value of the grantor’s retained rights at the time the gift transfer was made. The higher the interest rate, the lower the value of that gift and the less estate and gift tax is consumed when funding the QPRT. This is also considered a freeze technique because the QPRT freezes the value of the home for estate tax purposes.

Charitable remainder annuity trust (CRAT): Essentially the inverse of a CLAT, a CRAT allows the grantor to provide a regular income stream to non-charitable beneficiaries for the term of the trust, with the remaining trust assets left to charitable beneficiaries. When the assets are gifted to the CRAT, the grantor will receive a potential income tax deduction based on the remainder value that is being left to charity. The §7520 rate is used to calculate the value of the remainder to charity, so the higher the §7520 rate, the higher the potential income tax deduction. As a result, a CRAT becomes a potentially more attractive philanthropic vehicle as interest rates rise.

Estate and tax planning can be complicated, and careful consideration needs to be given to the implications of any arrangement. If you think any of these strategies might be appropriate for you, contact your attorney and tax professional to discuss how they may fit within your overall wealth plan.

Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah, Jeremy Eveland, Lawyer Jeremy Eveland, Jeremy Eveland Utah Attorney, Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah, law, estate, jordan, planning, lawyers, attorney, lawyer, probate, firm, state, clients, attorneys, business, city, divorce, trust, court, office, llc, consultation, dui, assets, years, family, states, tax, utah, matter, children, county, marriage, ascent, services, process, custody, cases, property, questions, wills, trusts, west jordan, lake county, ascent law, ascent law llc, free consultation, estate planning, law firm, legal issues, summary probate, initial consultation, legal problems, ascent law st., utah office ascent, utah office, car wreck, law question, lawyer divorce lawyer, family law attorneys, united states telephone, planning lawyers, same-sex couples, south jordan, estate planning lawyers, lake city, personal injury, same-sex marriage, law office, supreme court, estate planning attorney, real estate, lawyers, estate planning, trust, probate, west jordan, ut, attorney, assets, salt lake county, utah, law firm, utah, tax, jordan, beneficiaries, reputation, salt lake city, martindale-hubbell, lake, personal injury, law, irrevocable trusts, probate services, west jordan, utah, probate lawyer, living will, probate, asset protection, life insurance, will, liquidating, ira, estate tax, trust, income tax, required minimum distributions, advance directive, life insurance policies, personal injury

One of the primary benefits of an irrevocable trust is that it can help protect assets from creditors and lawsuits. Since the grantor no longer owns the assets, they are not subject to the claims of creditors or judgments against the grantor. This can be especially beneficial for individuals who are concerned about protecting their assets from potential creditors or lawsuits.

Another benefit of an irrevocable trust is that it can help reduce estate taxes. Since the assets are no longer owned by the grantor, they are not included in the grantor’s estate for tax purposes. This can help reduce the amount of estate taxes that must be paid.

In addition, an irrevocable trust can help ensure that assets are distributed according to the grantor’s wishes. The trustee is responsible for managing the trust assets and distributing them according to the terms of the trust. This can help ensure that the grantor’s wishes are carried out after their death.

Finally, an irrevocable trust can help avoid probate. Since the assets are no longer owned by the grantor, they do not need to go through the probate process. This can help save time and money, as well as ensure that the assets are distributed according to the grantor’s wishes.

Overall, an irrevocable trust can provide numerous benefits to individuals in West Jordan, UT. It can help protect assets from creditors and lawsuits, reduce estate taxes, ensure that assets are distributed according to the grantor’s wishes, and avoid probate. For these reasons, an irrevocable trust can be an invaluable estate planning tool.

How to Choose the Right Estate Planning Lawyer in West Jordan

When it comes to estate planning, it is important to choose the right lawyer to ensure that your wishes are carried out. An experienced estate planning lawyer in West Jordan can help you create a comprehensive plan that meets your needs and protects your assets. Here are some tips to help you choose the right estate planning lawyer in West Jordan:

1. Research: Before you hire an estate planning lawyer, it is important to do your research. Look for lawyers who specialize in estate planning and have experience in the area. Check their credentials and read reviews from past clients to get an idea of their level of expertise.

2. Ask Questions: Once you have narrowed down your list of potential lawyers, it is important to ask questions. Ask about their experience, fees, and the services they offer. Make sure you understand the process and the timeline for completing your estate plan.

3. Meet in Person: Once you have chosen a few potential lawyers, it is important to meet with them in person. This will give you an opportunity to get to know them and ask any additional questions you may have. It is also a good idea to bring a list of questions to the meeting so you can make sure all of your concerns are addressed.

4. Get References: Ask the lawyer for references from past clients. This will give you an idea of how they handle estate planning cases and how satisfied their clients are with their services.

By following these tips, you can ensure that you choose the right estate planning lawyer in West Jordan. With the right lawyer, you can create a comprehensive estate plan that meets your needs and protects your assets.

What to Expect During an Initial Consultation with an Estate Planning Lawyer in West Jordan UT

An initial consultation with an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, UT is an important step in ensuring that your estate is properly managed and distributed according to your wishes. During the consultation, the lawyer will ask you questions about your assets, debts, family members, and other important information. The lawyer will also explain the various estate planning options available to you and help you decide which option is best for your situation.

At the beginning of the consultation, the lawyer will ask you to provide information about your assets, debts, and family members. This includes information about any real estate, investments, bank accounts, and other assets you may have. You should also provide information about any debts you may have, such as mortgages, car loans, or credit card debt. Additionally, you should provide information about any family members who may be involved in your estate, such as children, grandchildren, or other relatives.

The lawyer will then explain the various estate planning options available to you. This includes wills, trusts, and other legal documents that can help you manage and distribute your assets according to your wishes. The lawyer will also explain the tax implications of each option and help you decide which option is best for your situation.

Finally, the lawyer will discuss any other questions or concerns you may have about estate planning. This includes questions about how to protect your assets from creditors, how to ensure that your wishes are followed after your death, and how to make sure that your estate is distributed according to your wishes.

An initial consultation with an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, UT is an important step in ensuring that your estate is properly managed and distributed according to your wishes. During the consultation, the lawyer will ask you questions about your assets, debts, family members, and other important information. The lawyer will also explain the various estate planning options available to you and help you decide which option is best for your situation.

Why You Need to Hire an Attorney for Estate Planning

Estate planning is an important process that helps individuals and families protect their assets and plan for the future. It involves making decisions about how to manage and distribute assets, such as property, investments, and other financial resources. Estate planning also involves making decisions about who will manage your affairs if you become incapacitated or pass away.

Hiring an attorney to help with estate planning is essential for ensuring that your wishes are carried out and that your assets are distributed according to your wishes. An experienced attorney can provide valuable advice and guidance on the best way to structure your estate plan. They can also help you understand the legal implications of your decisions and ensure that your estate plan is legally sound.

An attorney can help you create a will, trust, or other legal document that outlines your wishes for the distribution of your assets. They can also help you create a power of attorney document that allows you to designate someone to manage your affairs if you become incapacitated. An attorney can also help you create a living will, which outlines your wishes for medical care if you become unable to make decisions for yourself.

An attorney can also help you understand the tax implications of your estate plan. They can help you structure your estate plan in a way that minimizes taxes and ensures that your assets are distributed according to your wishes. An attorney can also help you understand the probate process and ensure that your estate is handled according to the law.

Finally, an attorney can provide valuable advice and guidance on how to protect your assets from creditors and other potential claims. They can help you create a plan that ensures that your assets are protected and that your wishes are carried out.

Hiring an attorney for estate planning is essential for ensuring that your wishes are carried out and that your assets are distributed according to your wishes. An experienced attorney can provide valuable advice and guidance on the best way to structure your estate plan and ensure that it is legally sound. They can also help you understand the tax implications of your estate plan and protect your assets from creditors and other potential claims.

Q&A

1. What services does an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah provide?

An estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah can provide a variety of services, including drafting wills, trusts, and other estate planning documents; advising clients on tax planning strategies; and helping clients navigate the probate process. They can also provide guidance on asset protection, elder law, and other related matters.

2. What should I look for when choosing an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah?

When choosing an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah, it is important to consider their experience and qualifications. You should also look for a lawyer who is knowledgeable about the laws in your state and who is willing to take the time to understand your individual needs and goals.

3. How much does an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah typically charge?

The cost of an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah will vary depending on the complexity of the case and the services provided. Generally, lawyers charge an hourly rate or a flat fee for their services.

4. What documents should I bring to my initial consultation with an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah?

When meeting with an estate planning lawyer in West Jordan, Utah, it is important to bring any relevant documents, such as a copy of your will, trust documents, and any other estate planning documents. You should also bring a list of questions and any other information that you think may be relevant to your case.

5. What is the difference between a will and a trust?

A will is a legal document that outlines how a person’s assets should be distributed upon their death. A trust is a legal entity that is created to manage and distribute assets according to the wishes of the person who created it.

6. What is probate?

Probate is the legal process of administering a deceased person’s estate. This includes collecting and distributing assets, paying debts, and resolving any disputes that may arise.

7. What is a power of attorney?

A power of attorney is a legal document that allows a person to appoint another person to act on their behalf in certain matters. This can include making financial decisions, managing property, and making medical decisions.

8. What is a living will?

A living will is a legal document that outlines a person’s wishes regarding medical care in the event that they become incapacitated. It can also be used to appoint someone to make medical decisions on their behalf.

Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah Consultation

When you need help from a Estate Planning Lawyer near West Jordan Utah call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

Home

Related Posts

Sustainable Business Model

Business Success

Management Training

Leadership Training

Estate Planning Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Business Contract Lawyer Spanish Fork

Accord and Satisfaction

Civil Litigation

Business Market Research

Corporate Attorney Riverton Utah

Advantages of Hiring a Utah Personal Injury Lawyer

Full Service Law Firm

Estate Planning Lawyer Provo Utah

Line of Credit

Issuance of Stock

Fair Labor Standards Act

Company Lawyer

Business Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Non-Profit Organizations

Creation of Trusts

Business Risk Management

Legal System

Trust Lawyer

Business Succession Lawyer Eagle Mountain Utah

Business Formation

Different Trust Types

Business Financial Management

Special Needs Trust

Estate Planning Lawyer West Jordan Utah

West Jordan, Utah

About West Jordan, Utah

West Jordan is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. It is a suburb of Salt Lake City and has a mixed economy. According to the 2020 Census, the city had a population of 116,961, placing it as the third most populous in the state. The city occupies the southwest end of the Salt Lake Valley at an elevation of 4,330 feet (1,320 m). Named after the nearby Jordan River, the limits of the city begin on the river's western bank and end in the eastern foothills of the Oquirrh Mountains, where Kennecott Copper Mine, the world's largest man-made excavation, is located.

Bus Stops in West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in West Jordan City Center Stn (Bay A) West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 8739 S West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 2210 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Sugar Factory Road Station (Bay B) West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 3050 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Jordan Valley Station (Bay C) West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 2320 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 3208 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 8001 S West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 @ S 5011 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Jordan Valley Station (Bay A) West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in 7800 S @ 3055 W West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Map of West Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions in West Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Driving Directions from Ascent Law LLC to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Cockayne Law Firm to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Kramer Law Group to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Utah Business Lawyer Mike Anderson to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Flickinger Boulton Gooch Robson to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Perretta Law Office to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Lewis Adams & Associates to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Robert S. Payne, Attorney at Law to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Ellis Law to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Weekes Law to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Utah Attorneys to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Driving Directions from Benjamin Durham Law Firm to 8833 S Redwood Rd # C, West Jordan, UT 84088, USA

Reviews for Jeremy Eveland West Jordan, Utah

Jeremy Eveland Reviews

Linda Hollingsworth

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Utah Business Attorney Jeremy Eveland is an attorney who not only is very knowledgeable about business laws and real estate laws, but he is a hard working lawyer who cared about us and our business.  You are best advised to use him if you can!

Jeremy Eveland Reviews

Ann Janet

starstarstarstarstar (5)

Jeremy Eveland is the guy you go to when you need a project done. I had him help me with my webiste. His insights were very helpful. He knows what he's doing. I've had good luck with him and you will too.

Goals of Estate Planning

Goals of Estate Planning

Goals of Estate Planning

Estate planning is an important process for people in Utah to consider. It is a way for individuals to take control of their assets and make sure that their wishes are carried out after they are gone. Estate planning can help ensure that the individual’s assets are distributed according to their wishes and that their family is taken care of. In Utah, there are specific goals that individuals should keep in mind when they are creating their estate plans.

The first goal of estate planning in Utah is to ensure the financial security of the individual’s family. This includes making sure that their spouse and children are provided for financially after the individual’s death. Estate planning can provide for the individual’s spouse and children by designating a beneficiary on life insurance policies, setting up trusts, or creating wills. It is important to have a plan in place to ensure that the individual’s family is taken care of financially after they are gone.

The second goal of estate planning in Utah is to minimize the tax burden on the individual’s family. Estate planning can help to reduce the taxes that the individual’s family will have to pay on their inheritance. This can be accomplished by taking advantage of certain tax benefits, such as using a trust or other estate-planning strategies. It is important to understand the tax implications of each estate-planning strategy so that the individual can make an informed decision about which one is best for their situation.

The third goal of estate planning in Utah is to ensure that the individual’s wishes are carried out after they are gone. Estate planning allows individuals to create documents that outline their wishes for the distribution of their assets after they are gone. This includes setting up trusts, creating wills, and making sure that their wishes are respected by the courts. By creating these documents, individuals can ensure that their wishes are followed after they are gone.

Goals of Estate Planning, Jeremy Eveland, Jeremy, Eveland, Lawyer Jeremy Eveland, Attorney Jeremy Eveland, Utah Attorney Jeremy Eveland, estate planning, assets, trust, probate, taxes, beneficiaries, executor, tax, estate taxes, utah, lehi, utah, power of attorney, lehi, park, law, attorney, probate court, spouse, massachusetts, bus, usa, heirs, estate, step up in basis, probate administration, estate planner, liquid assets, 401(k), cost-basis, living wills, advance directives, estate-planning, generation skipping, last testament, illiquid, trusted, will, living trust, probated, 529 plan, liquidity, additional medicare tax, powers of attorneys, revocable trust, estate, planning, assets, plan, tax, trust, taxes, goals, children, death, property, attorney, family, life, beneficiaries, state, person, time, care, power, income, probate, documents, process, court, law, home, asset, executor, business, decisions, wishes, people, gift, ones, trusts, amount, basis, objectives, spouse, estate planning, estate plan, estate taxes, loved ones, probate court, ascent law llc, minor children, estate plans, real estate, bus stop, estate planning goals, irrevocable trust, healthcare proxy, life estate deed, common estate planning, married couples, health care, durable power, legal documents, income taxes, nursing home, helpful guides, estate planner, proper estate planning, financial advisor, federal estate tax, internal revenue service, family members, united states, capital gains tax

The fourth goal of estate planning in Utah is to protect the individual’s assets from creditors. Estate planning can help individuals protect their assets from creditors by setting up trusts and other strategies. This can help ensure that the individual’s assets are not taken by creditors and that their family is taken care of financially.

The fifth goal of estate planning in Utah is to provide for the individual’s long-term care. Estate planning can help individuals plan for their long-term care needs by setting up trusts, creating wills, and taking advantage of other strategies. This can help ensure that the individual’s care needs are taken care of and that their wishes are respected by the courts.

The goals of estate planning in Utah are varied and can be tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances. It is important to understand the different goals of estate planning and to create a plan that takes into account the individual’s wishes and desires. By understanding the goals of estate planning in Utah, individuals can create a plan that will ensure that their wishes are carried out after they are gone and that their family is taken care of financially.

Estate Planning Consultation

When you need help with estate planning, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472 for a consultation.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472

Home

Related Posts

Business Succession Lawyer Lehi Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Millcreek Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Murray Utah

Business Transaction Lawyer

Construction Law

Business Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

What Is An Express Contract?

Antitrust Law

Salt Lake City Business Transaction Attorney

Business Succession Lawyer Herriman Utah

What Are The Advantages Of Hiring A Business Lawyer?

Business Succession Lawyer Logan Utah

Buy Sell Agreement

What Is The Relationship Between Business Law And Economies?

Litigation

Commercial Law

Business Transaction Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Registered Trade Marks

Due Diligence

Do I Need A Permit To Start A Business In Utah?

Business Succession Lawyer Draper Utah

Tax Law

Startup Attorney

Business Contract Lawyer Salt Lake City

Goals of Estate Planning

Business Succession Lawyer South Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer South Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer South Jordan Utah

If you are looking for a lawyer to help you with your South Jordan Utah Business for Succession Planning, you’ve found the right page. A company needs a business lawyer for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, a business lawyer can provide legal advice and representation in a variety of areas. This can include contract formation, intellectual property, labor and employment laws, tax laws, and more. Having a business lawyer on hand ensures that a company is aware of all applicable laws and regulations, and can ensure that the company is in compliance.

Business succession is a critical component of business planning and can be defined as the process of transferring a business from one owner to another. It is a complex process, as it involves assessing the state of the business, understanding the legal implications of the transfer, and planning for the financial implications of the transition. In the United States, business succession law is governed by state laws and it is important for business owners to understand their state’s specific laws and regulations.

Business Succession Lawyer South Jordan Utah, lawyer, bus, partnership, jordan, tax, usa, lindon, ut, ownership, attorney, salt lake city, south jordan, utah, st. george, salt, lake, business partnership, ogden, south jordan, ogden, utah, liability, llc, utah, corporation, limited liability companies, pass-through entity, professional limited liability company, llps, saint george, llcs, entity classification election, st. george, ut, saint george, utah, general partners, proprietorship, limited partner, corporate tax, probate, utah’s, sole traders, partner, business, succession, law, state, city, jordan, partnership, plan, lawyer, planning, attorney, family, eveland, owner, agreement, estate, bus, lawyers, partners, owners, directions, tax, george, stop, liability, ownership, park, county, lindon, clients, utah, firm, partner, entity, time, consultation, issues, type, attorneys, successor, south jordan, salt lake city, salt lake county, succession plan, business owners, commercial lawyers, utah business succession, business succession plan, united states, partnership agreement, corporate lawyer, construction lawyer, business attorney, free consultation, estate planning, business succession lawyer, business partnership agreement, ascent law llc, business succession planning, family members, buy-sell agreement, succession planning, sole proprietorship, business succession law, business owner, legal advice, legal services, st. george, bus stop, key employee, personal liability, general partnership,

For example, in Utah, business succession is a complicated process due to the state’s unique laws and regulations. In addition, there are a variety of business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies, that may affect the succession process. To ensure a successful transition, business owners should consult with qualified commercial lawyers or attorneys who specialize in business succession law and estate planning.

One of the first steps in business succession planning is to create a business succession plan. This plan should include a detailed assessment of the business, the current owners and partners, the potential successors, and the type of entity the business operates under. It should also include a buy-sell agreement to ensure that ownership transfers smoothly and a partnership agreement to ensure all partners understand their role in the transition. Additionally, the plan should include a detailed estate plan to address any tax and liability issues that may arise during the transition.

Once the plan is in place, business owners should consult with their lawyers or attorneys to discuss any legal issues and to ensure that their plan is compliant with the laws and regulations of their state. In Utah, for example, business owners should seek the advice of attorneys in South Jordan, Salt Lake City, or Salt Lake County who specialize in business succession law. These attorneys will be able to provide business owners with personalized legal advice tailored to their individual circumstances.

Finally, business owners should consider conducting a free consultation with their lawyers or attorneys to discuss any additional issues or concerns they may have. During this consultation, business owners can ask questions about the succession process, the legal implications of the transition, and any other matters related to the business succession plan.

By taking the time to properly plan and prepare for business succession, business owners can ensure that their transition is smooth and successful. With the help of a qualified lawyer or attorney, business owners can rest assured that their business succession plan meets all of their state’s legal requirements and that their transition will be successful.

Business Succession Plan

A business succession is the process of planning and preparing for the eventual transfer of the ownership and control of a business from one generation to the next. It is essential for any business that wants to sustain its current level of success into the future. A comprehensive succession plan will include strategies such as determining the future ownership and leadership of the business, as well as the financial, legal, and tax implications of the transfer of control. It also involves assessing the business’s current value, considering potential buyers, and identifying strategies to maximize the value of the business. The plan should also take into account the individual goals and objectives of the owners, as well as the impact of the succession on the employees and the business’s vendors, customers, and other stakeholders. By having a well-thought-out succession plan in place, the business will be better positioned to succeed into the future, even if changes occur in the ownership or control of the business.

Another critical role of a business lawyer is to protect the company from potential legal issues. A lawyer can provide guidance on how to best operate the company in a manner that is compliant with all applicable laws. This includes helping to draft contracts, ensuring that the company maintains proper records, and providing advice on how to best handle any disputes that may arise.

A business lawyer can also provide valuable guidance on how to structure and manage the business. This includes advice on how to structure the company, what types of contracts to use, how to best manage employees, and how to protect the company’s assets. This knowledge can be invaluable in ensuring long-term success for a company.

A business lawyer can provide important assistance in resolving disputes. A lawyer can help negotiate settlements and provide guidance on how to handle a dispute in the best way possible. This can be especially helpful in avoiding costly legal battles.

It’s clear that a company needs a business lawyer for a variety of reasons. A lawyer can provide advice and guidance on a variety of legal matters, protect the company from potential legal issues, provide guidance on how to structure and manage the business, and assist in resolving disputes. Having a business lawyer on hand can help ensure the long-term success of the company.

What type of cases do business lawyers work on?

As a business lawyer, I often work on securities and litigation cases. The type of cases that business lawyers work on is determined by the practice area. A major part of legal work revolves around corporate law, which covers anything from corporate mergers and acquisitions to securities law. These types of cases often involve a large amount of paperwork and multiple parties, so it’s important that the contracts are well-written and the filings are accurate. Many legal firms have specialized in this area, so their attorneys are able to handle these cases with ease.

Other types of cases might be more straightforward, but are still very important. White-collar criminal defense focuses on representing individuals as they face charges for business-related crimes such as embezzlement or money laundering, while employment law involves everything from discrimination suits to wrongful termination suits. Even if you’re not involved in a case yourself, it’s important to remember that your company can be affected even if you’re not directly involved. It pays to have a general knowledge of what types of business issues can come up in a court of law.

The legal profession is a broad one, and there are many different types of lawyers. Some of them focus on working with other business people to establish companies, file patents, and bring products to market. These attorneys need to be familiar with the laws governing businesses, including how to handle arbitration and legal disputes.

What is Business Law All About?

Business law is a field of law that deals with a range of subjects, from establishing a business to drafting contracts and handling legal disputes. It is designed to protect your company and its assets.

There are various types of businesses, including manufacturers, retailers, and corporations. All of them have specific rules and regulations to adhere to. The basic structure of a business is different from state to state. A typical step in setting up a business is to file paperwork. This formally establishes the business in the eyes of the government.

The business world can be a confusing place to navigate. Many entrepreneurs don’t know the laws governing them. Luckily, there are a number of laws in place to protect you from committing crimes or exposing yourself to liability.

One of the most important things a business owner can do is understand the legal issues in their industry. They can also use this knowledge to reduce the risk of a lawsuit.

Although the basics of business law are common knowledge, a good understanding of the subject can help you make better decisions. For instance, you can avoid a costly dispute by knowing the right types of contracts to use. You can also keep employees happy by implementing a sound employee policies.

Another useful business law concept is the use of due diligence. A corporate attorney may create a set of guidelines to help your company find a resolution to any legal dispute.

What Is The Legal Meaning Of Due Diligence In Business?

Due diligence refers to a level of care that is expected of a reasonable person before entering into a contract or an agreement. This is the kind of care that prevents bad outcomes from occurring.

Due diligence involves investigating a firm, product, or service in order to evaluate the information presented. It can also be used to identify the risks that are associated with a specific investment. In the era of transforming technologies, due diligence is more important than ever.

Traditional due diligence practices primarily examined financial statements and inventories, and looked into employee benefits and tax conditions. However, the term has since been extended to encompass a wider array of business contexts.

When buying a company, an individual buyer or an equity research firm may undertake the investigation. These people often have significant assets.

The results of this investigation are a tool that a buyer can use in negotiating a deal. If the findings are not satisfactory, the buyer might not proceed with the purchase. Alternatively, a buyer might request an extension from the seller.

In a merger or acquisition, due diligence is usually more rigorous. The buyer’s efforts may include checking out the background of a partner and using news reports to find out more about the business.

Many M&A analyses also include test market data and supplier and customer reviews. This is done to ensure that the deal is fair, or that the re-trade will not affect the value of the purchase.

Do I Need A Business Succession Lawyer?

Business lawyers specialize in providing legal advice to businesses of all sizes, from small startups to large corporations. They work on a wide range of cases, from drafting contracts to helping with mergers and acquisitions. Business lawyers provide advice on a variety of topics, including formation of business entities, corporate governance, employment law, securities law, intellectual property law, international business law, and antitrust law. In addition to providing advice, business lawyers represent clients in court when necessary.

Business lawyers are often called upon to review business documents, such as contracts, leases, and corporate filings. They are also responsible for ensuring that the terms of agreements are legally sound and comply with state and federal laws. Business lawyers may also advise clients on tax and financial issues, such as how to structure investments or comply with tax regulations. They also assist with mergers and acquisitions, helping to ensure that the terms of the transaction are favorable to the clients.

Business lawyers may also provide advice and representation in the areas of bankruptcy, creditors’ rights, and other related matters. They work closely with clients to develop strategies to minimize losses or maximize recoveries in cases of insolvency. Business lawyers are also called upon to mediate or negotiate disputes between businesses, such as contract disputes, wrongful termination, and other related matters.

By now you know that business lawyers work on a wide range of cases and provide legal advice on a variety of topics relating to business formation, corporate governance, employment law, and more. They review business documents, advise clients on tax and financial issues, represent clients in court, mediate or negotiate disputes, and provide other legal services.

South Jordan Utah Business Succession Lawyer Consultation

When you need legal help with a Business Succession Plan in South Jordan UT, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Jeremy Eveland
17 North State Street
Lindon UT 84042
(801) 613-1472
https://jeremyeveland.com

Recent Posts

Business Law

Business Lawyer

Contract Law

Offer and Acceptance

The Utah Uniform Partnership Act

The 10 Essential Elements of Business Succession Planning

Business Succession Law

Estate Planning

Utah Business Law

Advertising Law

Real Estate Law

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer St. George Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Provo Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Sandy Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Ogden Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Layton Utah

Business Succession Lawyer South Jordan Utah

Law Firm

Legal Contract

Intellectual Property

South Jordan, Utah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
South Jordan, Utah
A prominent building inside a strip mall area

South Jordan City Hall, March 2006
Two maps. The first map is a map of Utah with a colored in section in the middle representing where Salt Lake County is located. Second map is a map of Salt Lake County has a colored in section in the southwest showing where South Jordan is located.

Location in Salt Lake County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°33′42″N 111°57′39″WCoordinates40°33′42″N 111°57′39″W
Country  United States
State  Utah
County Salt Lake
Established 1859
Incorporated November 8, 1935[1]
Named for Jordan River
Government

 
 • Type council–manager
 • Mayor Dawn Ramsey
 • Manager Gary L. Whatcott
Area

 • Total 22.31 sq mi (57.77 km2)
 • Land 22.22 sq mi (57.54 km2)
 • Water 0.09 sq mi (0.23 km2)
Elevation

 
4,439 ft (1,353 m)
Population

 • Total 77,487
 • Density 3,452.07/sq mi (1,332.86/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP code
84009, 84095
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 70850
GNIS feature ID 1432728[4]
Website www.sjc.utah.gov

South Jordan is a city in south central Salt Lake CountyUtah, United States, 18 miles (29 km) south of Salt Lake City. Part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, the city lies in the Salt Lake Valley along the banks of the Jordan River between the 10,000-foot (3,000 m) Oquirrh Mountains and the 11,000-foot (3,400 m) Wasatch Mountains. The city has 3.5 miles (5.6 km) of the Jordan River Parkway that contains fishing ponds, trails, parks, and natural habitats. The Salt Lake County fair grounds and equestrian park, 67-acre (27 ha) Oquirrh Lake, and 37 public parks are located inside the city. As of 2020, there were 77,487 people in South Jordan.

Founded in 1859 by Mormon settlers and historically an agrarian town, South Jordan has become a rapidly growing bedroom community of Salt Lake City. Kennecott Land, a land development company, has recently begun construction on the master-planned Daybreak Community for the entire western half of South Jordan, potentially doubling South Jordan’s population. South Jordan was the first municipality in the world to have two temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Jordan River Utah Temple and Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple), it now shares that distinction with Provo, Utah. The city has two TRAX light rail stops, as well as one commuter rail stop on the FrontRunner.

South Jordan, Utah

About South Jordan, Utah

South Jordan is a city in south central Salt Lake County, Utah, United States, 18 miles (29 km) south of Salt Lake City. Part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, the city lies in the Salt Lake Valley along the banks of the Jordan River between the 10,000-foot (3,000 m) Oquirrh Mountains and the 11,000-foot (3,400 m) Wasatch Mountains. The city has 3.5 miles (5.6 km) of the Jordan River Parkway that contains fishing ponds, trails, parks, and natural habitats. The Salt Lake County fair grounds and equestrian park, 67-acre (27 ha) Oquirrh Lake, and 37 public parks are located inside the city. As of 2020, there were 77,487 people in South Jordan.

Bus Stops in South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Station (Bay A) South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pkwy @ 1523 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pkwy @ 1330 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pkwy @ 1667 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pky (10400 S) @ 4518 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Gateway @ 10428 S South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 10102 S South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pkwy @ 1526 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Jordan Gateway @ 11328 S South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in South Jordan Pkwy @ 428 W South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in River Front Pkwy @ 10648 S South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Redwood Rd @ 9412 S South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Map of South Jordan, Utah

Driving Directions in South Jordan, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Driving Directions from Pearson Butler to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Anderson | Hinkins to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Dean Smith, Attorney to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Gregory P. Hawkins to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Justin M. Myers, Attorney-at-Law, LLC to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Carr | Woodall to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Randall Sparks - Estate Planning Attorney to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Eisenberg Lowrance Lundell Lofgren to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Larson Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Skousen Law PLLC to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Hundley & Harrison to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Beutler Law P.C. - Debt Relief, Chapter 7 & 13, Bankruptcy Attorney to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Reviews for Jeremy Eveland South Jordan, Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah, business, law, orem, lawyers, estate, lawyer, attorney, succession, firm, partnership, planning, agreement, george, county, attorneys, state, clients, partners, plan, parties, services, llc, mediation, litigation, tax, consultation, process, case, park, family, mediator, partner, city, probate, businesses, issues, office, st., areas, bus, utah county, law firm, free consultation, partnership agreement, legal services, business partnership agreement, ascent law llc, estate administration lawyers, succession plan, estate planning, eveland bus stop, bus stop, st. george, ethical standards, business law, legal advice, business litigation, business lawyers, saint george, effective mediator, gravis law, business owners, estate planning lawyers, legal solutions, business partnership, state street, free help, business succession plan, utah business succession, business succession lawyer, lawyer, attorney, partnership, orem, ut, mediation, clients, orem, law firm, tax, business partnership, bus, provo, probate, litigation, llc, utah, saint george, utah, legal services, liability, law, usa, ownership, utah, law firm, stakes, great basin, cpas, mediators, interstate 15, utah, utah, united states, stock, legal services, dixie, settlement, ownership interest, ownership, orem, orem city, wasatch, life insurance, consensus, insurance, general partners, business partnership, mojave desert

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Hiring Attorney Jeremy Eveland to draft a business succession plan in Orem, Utah is a wise decision for anyone looking for experienced legal counsel. With many years of experience in business law, Jeremy is well-versed in the nuances of business succession planning and has a deep understanding of the legal process. He works diligently with clients to ensure they understand their options and can make informed decisions. Jeremy has extensive experience in the Orem area and is a member of the Utah State Bar.

This article is part of business succession law, which is a subsection of business law.

When business disputes happen, he is an effective working with the mediator, and assisting parties to come to an agreement that meets their mutual needs. He is also a skilled litigator, having handled a variety of business cases in his career. He is committed to providing ethical and legal advice to the clients he serves.

Orem Utah Business Lawyer

For those looking for probate, estate planning, or estate administration lawyers, Jeremy is a solid choice. He is knowledgeable in the areas of estate planning, probate, and liability, and is experienced in creating partnership agreements, buy-sell agreements, and other documents related to business succession planning. He is well-versed in the tax implications of estate planning and can provide advice on how to minimize taxes and maximize estate value.

Business Formation Attorney Orem UT

Jeremy is also well-versed in the process of creating LLCs and other business entities. He can help clients draft the necessary paperwork, such as partnership agreements and operating agreements, to ensure the business is properly formed and all parties involved are properly protected. He can also provide legal advice on the ownership stakes of each business partner and the ownership interests of each party.

Jeremy is committed to providing the best legal services and solutions to his clients. He offers free consultations and is available to answer any questions clients might have. He is also available to discuss mediation, if necessary, to reach a settlement agreement between parties.

Utah Business Entity

When we talk about business entities, we are referring to the type or structure of a business as opposed to what the business does. How a business is structured affects how taxes are paid, liabilities are determined, and of course, paperwork. Business entities—organizations created by one or more people to carry on a trade—are usually created at the state level, often by filing documents with a state agency such as the Secretary of State.

Business entities are subject to taxation and must file a tax return.

For federal income tax purposes, some business entities are, by default, considered not to be separate from their owner. Such is the case with sole proprietors and single-member limited liability companies. The income and deductions related to these entities are normally reported on the same tax return as the owner of the business. The IRS calls these disregarded entities because it “disregards” the separate name and structure of the business. However, a disregarded entity can choose to be treated as if it were a separate entity. This is done by making an Entity Classification Election using Form 8832 and filing this form with the IRS. The purpose of this form is to choose a classification other than the default classification provided by federal tax laws.

Confusion Over Business and tax Terms

Distinguishing between the actual organizational structure created under state law and the tax classification can cause confusion, especially if the same words are used for both concepts. Colloquially, when accountants talk about “entities” or “entity returns,” they are referring to tax returns other than for individual people.
In simplest terms, a business entity is an organization created by an individual or individuals to conduct business, engage in a trade, or partake in similar activities. There are various types of business entities—sole proprietorship, partnership, LLC, corporation, etc.—and a business’s entity type dictates both the structure of that organization and how that company is taxed.

When starting a business, one of the first things you want to do is choose the structure of your company—in other words, choose a business entity type. This decision will have important legal and financial implications for your business. The amount of taxes you have to pay depends on your business entity choice, as does the ease with which you can get a small business loan or raise money from investors. Plus, if someone sues your business, your business entity structure determines your risk exposure. State governments in the U.S. recognize more than a dozen different types of business entities, but the average small business owner chooses between these six: sole proprietorship, general partnership, limited partnership (LP), limited liability company (LLC), C-corporation, and S-corporation.

Business Succession Lawyer Free Consultation

When you need a business succession attorney, call Jeremy D. Eveland, MBA, JD (801) 613-1472.

Areas We Serve

We serve businesses and business owners for succession planning in the following locations:

Business Succession Lawyer Salt Lake City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Jordan Utah

Business Succession Lawyer St. George Utah

Business Succession Lawyer West Valley City Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Provo Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Sandy Utah

Business Succession Lawyer Orem Utah

Types of Business Entities in Utah

As we mentioned above, at a very basic level, a business entity simply means an organization that has been formed to conduct business. However, the type of entity you choose for your business determines how your company is structured and taxed. For example, by definition, a sole proprietorship must be owned and operated by a single owner. If your business entity type is a partnership, on the other hand, this means there are two or more owners. Similarly, if you establish a business as a sole proprietorship, this means for tax purposes, you’re a pass-through entity (the taxes are passed onto the business owner). Conversely, if you establish your business as a corporation, this means the business exists separately from its owners, and therefore, pays separate taxes. Generally, to actually establish your business’s entity structure, you’ll register in the state where your business is located. With all of this in mind, the chart below summarizes the various entity types business owners can choose from:

Business Entity Type

• Sole proprietorship: Unincorporated business with one owner or jointly owned by a married couple
• General partnership: Unincorporated business with two or more owners
• Limited partnership: Registered business composed of active, general partners and passive, limited partners
• Limited liability partnership: Partnership structure that shields all partners from personal liability
• Limited liability limited partnership: Type of limited partnership with some liability protection for general partners
• Limited liability company (LLC): Registered business with limited liability for all members
• Professional limited liability company: LLC structure for professionals, such as doctors and accountants
• C-corporation: Incorporated business composed of shareholders, directors, and officers
• S-corporation: Incorporated business that is taxed as a pass-through entity
• Professional corporation: Corporate structure for professionals, such as doctors and accountants
• B-corporation: For-profit corporation that is certified for meeting social and environmental standards
• Nonprofit: Corporation formed primarily to benefit the public interest rather than earn a profit
• Estate: Separate legal entity created to distribute an individual’s property after death
• Municipality: Corporate status given to a city or town
• Cooperative: Private organization owned and controlled by a group of individuals for their own benefit

As you can see, there are numerous types of business entities; however, most business owners will choose from the six most common options: sole proprietorship, general partnership, limited partnership, LLC, C-corporation, or S-corporation. Below, we’ve explained each of these popular business entity types, as well as the pros and cons of choosing each particular structure for your company.

Sole Proprietorship

A sole proprietorship is the simplest business entity, with one person (or a married couple) as the sole owner and operator of the business. If you launch a new business and are the only owner, you are automatically a sole proprietorship under the law. There’s no need to register a sole proprietorship with the state, though you might need local business licenses or permits depending on your industry. Freelancers, consultants, and other service professionals commonly work as sole proprietors, but it’s also a viable option for more established businesses, such as retail stores, with one person at the helm.

Pros of Sole Proprietorship

• Easy to start (no need to register your business with the state).
• No corporate formalities or paperwork requirements, such as meeting minutes, bylaws, etc.
• You can deduct most business losses on your personal tax return.
• Tax filings is easy—simply fill out and attach Schedule C-Profit or Loss From Business to your personal income tax return.

Cons of Sole Proprietorship

• As the only owner, you’re personally responsible for all of the business’s debts and liabilities—someone who wins a lawsuit against your business can take your personal assets (your car, personal bank accounts, even your home in some situations).
• There’s no real separation between you and the business, so it’s more difficult to get a business loan and raise money (lenders and investors prefer LLCs or corporations).
• It’s harder to build business credit without a registered business entity.
Sole proprietorships are by far the most popular type of business structure in the U.S. because of how easy they are to set up. There’s a lot of overlap between your personal and business finances, which makes it easy to launch and file taxes. The problem is that this same lack of separation can also land you in legal trouble. If a customer, employee, or another third party successfully sues your business, they can take your personal assets. Due to this risk, most sole proprietors eventually convert their business to an LLC or corporation.

General Partnership (GP)

Partnerships share many similarities with sole proprietorships—the key difference is that the business has two or more owners. There are two kinds of partnerships: general partnerships (GPs) and limited partnerships (LPs). In a general partnership, all partners actively manage the business and share in the profits and losses. Like a sole proprietorship, a general partnership is the default mode of ownership for multiple-owner businesses—there’s no need to register a general partnership with the state. I’ve written about the Utah Uniform Partnership Act previously.

Pros of General Partnership

• Easy to start (no need to register your business with the state).
• No corporate formalities or paperwork requirements, such as meeting minutes, bylaws, etc.
• You don’t need to absorb all the business losses on your own because the partners divide the profits and losses.
• Owners can deduct most business losses on their personal tax returns.

Cons of General Partnership

• Each owner is personally liable for the business’s debts and other liabilities.
• In some states, each partner may be personally liable for another partner’s negligent actions or behavior (this is called joint and several liability).
• Disputes among partners can unravel the business (though drafting a solid partnership agreement can help you avoid this).
• It’s more difficult to get a business loan, land a big client, and build business credit without a registered business entity.

Most people form partnerships to lower the risk of starting a business. Instead of going all-in on your own, having multiple people sharing the struggles and successes can be very helpful, especially in the early years. This being said, if you do go this route, it’s very important to choose the right partner or partners. Disputes can seriously limit a business’s growth, and many state laws hold each partner fully responsible for the actions of the others. For example, if one partner enters into a contract and then violates one of the terms, the third party can personally sue any or all of the partners.

Limited Partnership (LP)

Unlike a general partnership, a limited partnership is a registered business entity. To form an LP, therefore, you must file paperwork with the state. In an LP, there are two kinds of partners: those who own, operate, and assume liability for the business (general partners), and those who act only as investors (limited partners, sometimes called “silent partners”). Limited partners don’t have control over business operations and have fewer liabilities. They typically act as investors in the business and also pay fewer taxes because they have a more tangential role in the company.

Pros of Limited Partnership

• An LP is a good option for raising money because investors can serve as limited partners without personal liability.
• General partners get the money they need to operate but maintain authority over business operations.
• Limited partners can leave anytime without dissolving the business partnership.

Cons of Limited Partnership

• General partners are personally responsible for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• More expensive to create than a general partnership and requires a state filing.
• A limited partner may also face personal liability if they inadvertently take too active a role in the business.

Multi-owner businesses that want to raise money from investors often do well as LPs because investors can avoid liability. You might come across yet another business entity structure called a limited liability partnership (LLP). In an LLP, none of the partners have personal liability for the business, but most states only allow law firms, accounting firms, doctor’s offices, and other professional service firms to organize as LLPs. These types of businesses can organize as an LLP to avoid each partner being liable for the other’s actions. For example, if one doctor in a medical practice commits malpractice, having an LLP lets the other doctors avoid liability.

C-Corporation

A C-corporation is an independent legal entity that exists separately from the company’s owners. Shareholders (the owners), a board of directors, and officers have control over the corporation, although one person in a C-corp can fulfill all of these roles, so it is possible to create a corporation where you’re in charge of everything. This being said, with this type of business entity, there are many more regulations and tax laws that the company must comply with. Methods for incorporating, fees, and required forms vary by state.

Pros of C-corporation

• Owners (shareholders) don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• C-corporations are eligible for more tax deductions than any other type of business.
• C-corporation owners pay lower self-employment taxes.
• You have the ability to offer stock options, which can help you raise money in the future.

Cons of C-corporation

• More expensive to create than sole proprietorships and partnerships (the filing fees required to incorporate a business range from $100 to $500 based on which state you’re in).
• C-corporations face double taxation: The company pays taxes on the corporate tax return, and then shareholders pay taxes on dividends on their personal tax returns.
• Owners cannot deduct business losses on their personal tax returns.
• There are a lot of formalities that corporations have to meet, such as holding board and shareholder meetings, keeping meeting minutes, and creating bylaws.
Most small businesses pass over C-corps when deciding how to structure their business, but they can be a good choice as your business grows and you find yourself needing more legal protections. The biggest benefit of a C-corp is limited liability. If someone sues the business, they are limited to taking business assets to cover the judgment—they can’t come after your home, car, or other personal assets. This being said, corporations are a mixed bag from a tax perspective—there are more tax deductions and fewer self-employment taxes, but there’s the possibility of double taxation if you plan to offer dividends. Owners who invest profits back into the business as opposed to taking dividends are more likely to benefit under a corporate structure.

S-Corporation

An S-corporation preserves the limited liability that comes with a C-corporation but is a pass-through entity for tax purposes. This means that, similar to a sole prop or partnership, an S-corp’s profits and losses pass through to the owners’ personal tax returns. There’s no corporate-level taxation for an S-corp.

Pros of S-corporation

• Owners (shareholders) don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts and liabilities.
• No corporate taxation and no double taxation: An S-corp is a pass-through entity, so the government taxes it much like a sole proprietorship or partnership.

Cons of S-corporation

• Like C-corporations, S-corporations are more expensive to create than both sole proprietorships and partnerships (requires registration with the state).
• There are more limits on issuing stock with S-corps vs. C-corps.
• You still need to comply with corporate formalities, like creating bylaws and holding board and shareholder meetings.
In order to organize as an S-corporation or convert your business to an S-corporation, you have to file IRS form 2553. S-corporations can be a good choice for businesses that want a corporate structure but like the tax flexibility of a sole proprietorship or partnership.

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

A limited liability company takes positive features from each of the other business entity types. Like corporations, LLCs offer limited liability protections. But, LLCs also have less paperwork and ongoing requirements, and in that sense, they are more like sole proprietorships and partnerships. Another big benefit is that you can choose how you want the IRS to tax your LLC. You can elect to have the IRS treat it as a corporation or as a pass-through entity on your taxes.

Pros of LLC

• Owners don’t have personal liability for the business’s debts or liabilities.
• You can choose whether you want your LLC to be taxed as a partnership or as a corporation.
• Not as many corporate formalities compared to an S-corp or C-corp.

Cons of LLC

• It’s more expensive to create an LLC than a sole proprietorship or partnership (requires registration with the state).
LLCs are popular among small business owners, including freelancers, because they combine the best of many worlds: the ease of a sole proprietorship or partnership with the legal protections of a corporation.

At the end of the day, hiring Attorney Jeremy Eveland to draft a business succession plan in Orem, Utah is a wise decision. With his extensive experience, knowledge, and commitment to providing the best legal solutions, clients can be assured that their business succession plan will be drafted with the utmost care and consideration. Jeremy is committed to providing the best legal advice and is available to answer any questions or concerns clients may have. With Jeremy’s help, clients can feel confident in their business succession plan and the future of their business.

Orem, Utah

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Orem, Utah
Orem City Center

Orem City Center
Flag of Orem, Utah

Nickname: 

Family City USA
Location in Utah County and the state of Utah

Location in Utah County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 40°17′56″N 111°41′47″WCoordinates40°17′56″N 111°41′47″W
Country United States
State Utah
County Utah
Settled 1877
Town charter granted May 5, 1919
Named for Walter C. Orem
Government

 
 • Mayor David Young
 • Spokesman Steven Downs
 • City Manager James P. Davidson[2]
Area

 
 • Total 18.57 sq mi (48.10 km2)
 • Land 18.57 sq mi (48.10 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation

 
4,774 ft (1,455 m)
Population

 (2020)
 • Total 98,129[1]
 • Density 5,267.22/sq mi (2,033.67/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-6 (MDT)
Area codes 385, 801
FIPS code 49-57300[3]
GNIS feature ID 1444110[4]
Website www.orem.org]

Orem is a city in Utah CountyUtah, United States, in the northern part of the state. It is adjacent to ProvoLindon, and Vineyard and is approximately 45 miles (72 km) south of Salt Lake City.

Orem is one of the principal cities of the Provo-Orem, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Utah and Juab counties. The 2020 population was 98,129,[1] while the 2010 population was 88,328[5] making it the fifth-largest city in UtahUtah Valley University is located in Orem.

Orem, Utah

About Orem, Utah

Orem is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States, in the northern part of the state. It is adjacent to Provo, Lindon, and Vineyard and is approximately 45 miles (72 km) south of Salt Lake City.

Bus Stops in Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Orem Central Station (Bay E) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Orem / Provo, UT Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Orem McDonalds Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in State St @ 418 N Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Orem Central Station (Bay A) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in State St @ 763 N Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Center St / Orem Blvd (WB) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in Center St / 600 W (EB) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in UVU Station (adjacent bus stop EB) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in State St @ 1951 N Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in State St @ 101 S Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Bus Stop in UVU Institute (EB) Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Map of Orem, Utah

Driving Directions in Orem, Utah to Jeremy Eveland

Driving Directions from Dexter & Dexter Attorneys at Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Siegfried & Jensen to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Lincoln Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Keen Law Offices, LLC to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Johnstun Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Good Guys Injury Law - Christensen & Hymas to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Heritage Law Offices to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Weekes Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Johnson | Livingston, PLLC to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Utah Eviction Law to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Veil to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Driving Directions from Gutierrez & Assoc. PLLC to 17 N State St, Lindon, UT 84042, USA

Reviews for Jeremy Eveland Orem, Utah